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How VMware Embraced Its Open Source Nemesis

Cade Metz | Wired | July 24, 2012

VMware just spent $1.26 billion to secure its place in the future of computer networking. But in acquiring the swashbuckling Silicon Valley startup Nicira, the virtualization giant is also shifting even further into the world of open source software, a world it was once very much at odds with — and in some ways still is. Read More »

How We Brought the Internet to Standing Rock

Last spring a group I follow on Facebook started sharing information about an oil pipeline, called the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), that was planned to go in the ground in North Dakota, and the Water Protectors, teenagers from the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation who were standing up to try to stop that from happening. As I watched the story unfold over the next few months, I knew that I wanted to go out there and see how the nonprofit organization I work for, Geeks Without Bounds, could help...

IBM Is Upping Its Game In Cloud Computing—And So Is Everyone Else

Gina Chon | Quartz | June 4, 2013

IBM today announced its biggest deal to date under its new CEO, Virginia Rometty, who took over last year. The company acquired cloud computing firm SoftLayer to help it compete with Amazon, the leader in public cloud services. Read More »

IBM Pitched Its Watson Supercomputer as a Revolution in Cancer Care. It’s Nowhere Close

Casey Ross | STAT | September 5, 2017

It was an audacious undertaking, even for one of the most storied American companies: With a single machine, IBM would tackle humanity’s most vexing diseases and revolutionize medicine. Breathlessly promoting its signature brand — Watson — IBM sought to capture the world’s imagination, and it quickly zeroed in on a high-profile target: cancer. But three years after IBM began selling Watson to recommend the best cancer treatments to doctors around the world, a STAT investigation has found that the supercomputer isn’t living up to the lofty expectations IBM created for it. It is still struggling with the basic step of learning about different forms of cancer...

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Increase in International Cyber Attacks Calls for National Testbed

HSD Foundation | The Hague Security Delta | October 24, 2016

On Friday 21st of October The United States was subjected to massive and widespread cyberattacks which disrupted website domains and internet traffic through DDoS attacks. DDoS attacks flood websites with traffic and impairs normal services. "The massive outage drew the attention of the FBI which said Friday that it was "investigating all potential causes" of the attack." Popular websites like Twitter, Amazon, Spotify and Netflix went down for some users on Friday...

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Innovation Needs Dumb Ideas

Over the years I've listened to many new-to-health-care entrepreneurs pitch their great new idea. They're so excited: health care is so inefficient! People are so frustrated by the system! It will be so easy to improve it! I usually end up thinking, "Oh, you poor people. You really don't know much about health care, do you?" They don't fully grasp the strange way it is bought and sold, the convoluted financing, or the layers of regulation. So I wish them well and wait to hear about their eventual failure. But now I'm thinking, maybe it is experts like me who are part of health care's problem. In Harvard Business Review, Ayse Birsel suggests that companies need to do more "reverse thinking," deliberately thinking up wrong ideas...

Inside Obama's Stealth Startup

Jon Gertner | Fast Company | June 15, 2015

The new hub of Washington’s tech insurgency is something known as the U.S. Digital Service, which is headquartered in a stately brick townhouse half a block from the White House. USDS -employees tend to congregate with their laptops at a long table at the back half of the parlor floor. If there’s no room, they retreat downstairs to a low-ceilinged basement, sprawling on cushioned chairs. Apart from an air-hockey table, there aren’t many physical reminders of West Coast startup culture—a lot of the new techies are issued BlackBerrys, which seems to cause them near-physical pain...

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Investing in Open Source Companies & Solutions is Smart Business

Who would really want to invest in companies that have embraced the 'open source' movement?... It turns out there just might be a lot of 21st century companies that have embraced open source, open access, open data, open standards, open architecture… and are overtaking or outperforming major companies that used to dominate in the last century..."Bill Gates, VCs Invest $35M In ResearchGate",  "Mirantis Fuels Open Source OpenStack with $10 Million Investment", "One day, three deals, $150 million in open source funding", "Open Source technology investment to increase significantly by 2018". Pay attention to these headlines from recent news articles related to investing in 'open source'.

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Jim Whitehurst Argues that Innovation Requires New Approaches to Feedback and Failure

"Organizational culture" is something plenty of people are puzzling over today, and with good reason. More and more leaders are realizing that the culture permeating and guiding their organizations will determine whether they succeed or fail. The term “organizational culture” refers to an alignment between two forces inside an organization: values and behaviors. Aligning those forces productively is one of the most difficult and important tasks facing leaders today. Customers and partners routinely tell me they want to create a "culture of innovation" in their organizations. By this, they usually mean that they want to create contexts where certain actions—those that generate new and unforeseen sources of value capable of fueling growth—are not only expected but also commonplace...

Kangaroos, Insurance Companies, and the Rising Cost of Healthcare

Complaining about health care prices is nothing new. The medical component of CPI has been higher than the overall CPI for decades. As far back as 1989 Gerry Anderson and colleagues showed "It's the Prices, Stupid" that explained why our national spending was so high compared to other countries. More recently, Elizabeth Rosenthal detailed those prices in an series of reports in The New York Times. She recently followed those up with her incisive book An American Sickness. Dr. Rosenthal also illustrated some of the clever techniques used to wring the most money out of our pockets, such as the upcoding industry and tacking facility fees onto visits. As the saying goes, if you're sitting at a poker table and you can't figure out who the sucker is, it's you.

Location, Location, Location: Want To Help Mozilla Break The Ecosystem Locks?

Stephan Shankland | CNET | March 27, 2014

The MozStumbler app is one way Android users can assist Mozilla with its quest to open up the walled gardens of Apple and Google. Read More »

Medical Drones Could Beat Amazon to the Skies, with Harvard Help

Hiawatha Bray | The Boston Globe | March 9, 2016

The less you’ve got, the less you’ve got to lose. Which is why cargo delivery drones may become popular in Africa long before they catch on over here. Jonathan Ledgard thinks it’ll happen. The former chief Africa correspondent of the news magazine The Economist is coming to Boston on Thursday to lay out his plan to build a cargo network called Redline. Developed with help from students at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, and backed by the government of Switzerland, Redline will use drones to deliver medical supplies to remote parts of Rwanda. It has already raised $8 million...

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Microsoft, Amazon, Google, IBM, Oracle, and Salesforce Issue Joint Statement Making Commitment to Open Source Healthcare Interoperability

Josh Mandel | Microsoft Industry Blog | August 13, 2018

Interoperability is an overlapping set of technical and policy challenges, from data access to common data models to information exchange to workflow integration – and these challenges often pose a barrier to healthcare innovation. Microsoft has been engaged for many years on developing best practices for interoperability across industries. Today, as health IT community leaders get together at the CMS Blue Button 2.0 Developer Conference here in Washington, DC, we’re pleased to announce that Microsoft has joined with Amazon, Google, IBM, Oracle, and Salesforce in support of healthcare interoperability...

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NASA and OpenStack Not Lost in Space — or in the Cloud

David M. Fishman | Mirantis | June 29, 2012

A couple of weeks ago, just before GigaOM Structure (the cloud equivalent of short Indian Wedding), Twitter and the headlines rang out with the news that NASA, home of the space program, the Apollo moonshot, the International Space Station, and the space shuttles, was retiring yet another of its signature innovations: OpenStack. Read More »

Netflix And YouTube Make Up Majority Of US Internet Traffic, New Report Shows

Amanda Holpuch | The Guardian | November 11, 2013

Peer-to-peer file sharing has declined and Amazon and Hulu struggle to win receding American attention spans Read More »