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New Research Estimates Value of Removing DRM Locks

Cory Doctorow | Electronic Frontier Foundation | July 9, 2017

My co-authors and I at the University of Glasgow are investigating how restrictions on interoperability imposed by Digital Rights Management (DRM) systems might impact the market for goods. We are doing this as part of a larger project to better understand the economics of DRM and to figure out what changes would likely occur if the laws were reformed. Our recent working paper is titled ‘How much do consumers value interoperability: Evidence from the price of DVD players’...

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New Research Shows Attackers Turning to Encrypted Cyber Attacks During Pandemic

Press Release | Zscaler, ThreatLabZ | November 10, 2020

Zscaler, Inc...today released its 2020 State of Encrypted Attacks report, published by the Zscaler ThreatLabZ team. The threat research reveals the emerging techniques and impacted industries behind a 260-percent spike in attacks using encrypted channels to bypass legacy security controls. The report provides guidance on how IT and security leaders can protect their enterprise from the rising trend of encrypted threats, based on insight sourced from over 6.6 billion encrypted threats across the Zscaler™ cloud from January through September 2020 over encrypted channels. To download and read, see the 2020 State of Encrypted Attacks.

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NIH Bets Big Bucks On Big Data

Joseph Marks | Nextgov | July 23, 2013

The National Institutes of Health plans to invest up to $96 million over four years to put big data to work solving persistent health riddles, the agency said Monday. Read More »

Numbers Don't Lie: Patent Trolls Are A Plague

Simon Phipps | InfoWorld | October 19, 2012

Recent research supports view that patent troll activity is rising -- costing America a fortune in wasted legal fees and lost jobs Read More »

Open Source Databases Keep Chipping Away At Oracle’s Empire

Klint Finley | WIRED | January 7, 2015

The three fastest growing databases of 2014 were all open source, according to a new report from DB-Engines, a site that tracks popularity in the rapidly changing database marketplace...

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Open Source Goes Corporate: Can Open Healthcare Be Far Behind?

If you aren't in IT, you may have missed the news that IBM is acquiring Red Hat, a leader in the open source Linux movement, or that, a couple days prior, Microsoft closed on its acquisition of GitHub, a leader in open source software development. Earlier this year Salesforce acquired Mulesoft, and Cloudera and Hortonworks merged; all were other open source leaders. I must confess, I had never heard of some of these companies, but I'm starting to believe what MarketWatch said following the IBM announcement: "open source has truly arrived." What exactly that means, especially for healthcare, I'm not sure, but it's worth exploring. IBM is paying $34b for Red Hat.

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Open Source Software Is More Secure Than You Think

Lasse Andresen | SC Magazine | October 8, 2013

[...] Open source is growing in the enterprise, but oftentimes when people think of open source, they are concerned about the potential security issues. But, those security concerns are merely myths. So, what is the reality when it comes to open source software security? Read More »

Open Source: The Antidote for “Too Big to Fail”

Michael Tiemann | OpenSource.com | October 20, 2011

If you look at the evolution of the IT landscape over the past 30 years, you see two distinct trends: the continued growth of the IT dinosaurs (mainframe computing and mainframe wannabes like Sun) and the emergence of highly modular, adaptable systems, which, by their very process of evolution, not only best suit the current needs, but plant the seeds for the next computer revolution. Read More »

OpenID Connect May Usher In A New Era Of Federated Online Identity

Alex Howard | Tech Republic | May 15, 2014

OpenID Connect is designed to replace username/password authentication. The protocol, in use by Google and others, may solve governments' needs to authenticate users accessing digital services...

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Patients Are Not Consumers...But Who Is?

It has become an article of faith in some health policy circles over the past 20 years that the "solution" for our health care system's woes is to make us better health care consumers -- the so-called consumer-driven movement. After all, we've known for at least forty years that increased cost-sharing does influence how much health care we consume, so, in theory, higher deductibles and coinsurance, plus better cost/quality information, should give us the right incentives to shop. Most health care professionals are equally convinced patients aren't, and are never going to be, "consumers" in any meaningful sense.  Health care is too scary, relies on too much specialized information, and is too often "consumed" at times when we are least able to make thoughtful decisions...

Promoting Earthquake Readiness

Harvey V. Fineberg | Washington Monthly | July 1, 2016

In Oregon, Washington State and California, an early warning system helps citizens and officials better prepare for and respond to earthquakes. In the early morning hours on August 24, 2014, scientists at UC Berkeley received a “ShakeAlert” – an alarm providing warning of a pending earthquake. Five seconds later, the city of Napa felt a magnitude 6.0 earthquake. That five-second warning was an early success for a broader goal: the creation of an earthquake early warning system that can communicate the size, extent and timing of imminent earthquakes on the West Coast...

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Q&A: Moving From A PCMH To A 'Medical Neighborhood' Via Direct

Tom Sullivan | Government Health IT | May 31, 2012

Sharing medical records between different vendors' EHRs is one of the meaningful use Stage 2 measures that some folks would like to see yanked – but not MedAllies' Holly Miller, MD, or John Blair, MD. Read More »

Red Hat Closing In On $2 Billion In Its Fourth Quarter

Charles Babcock | Information Week | December 28, 2015

Red Hat finishes 2015 on a strong financial note, with OpenShift 3.1 positioned as its next-generation cloud application development platform. Red Hat reported its third quarter 2016 results Nov. 30, and largely contrary to expectations, it's still going strong. Advances in cloud computing, VMware's strong virtualization product line, the Cloud Foundry open source development platform, and Amazon and other cloud computing services were all supposed to be sapping Red Hat's strength. On the contrary, as long as Red Hat remains at the core of the enterprise data center with its Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system, it will remain a viable competitor to VMware, the open source development platform Cloud Foundry, and proprietary clouds. ..

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Report Outlines IT Challenges And Guidelines For State HIXs

Anthony Brino | Government Health IT | September 20, 2012

Along with the financial challenges of creating health insurance exchanges, and some of the political resistence to them, state governments have an enormous amount of IT work to do — perhaps chief among all the tasks is replacing arcane software with IT that can link HIX, Medicaid and CHIP systems, and function like Amazon.com. Read More »

Rush Medical Center Demoes Patient-Centered Blue Button 2.0 Mobile App at White House Event

Press Release | Rush University Medical Center | August 17, 2018

Information technology has changed the world, and now it’s changing health care in dramatic and fast-moving ways. Rush is a nationally-recognized leader in using IT to achieve better outcomes, lower costs and improve the patient experience. This leadership reached the White House on Monday, when...Rab and Boutrs presented MyRush Mobile, an app for mobile phones developed by Rush’s information systems department, to representatives of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, including CMS director Seema Verma. The presentation was part of the Blue Button 2.0 Conference, a gathering of software developers held in the White House South Court Auditorium.

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