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Biden Announces Major Open Initiatives At Cancer Moonshot Summit

Press Release | The White House | June 28, 2016

Today, the Cancer Moonshot is hosting a summit at Howard University, in Washington, D.C. as part of a national day of action that also includes more than 270 events in communities across the United States.  Vice President Joe Biden will join over 350 researchers, oncologists and other care providers, data and technology experts, patients, families, and patient advocates, among others, will come together at Howard University.  They will be joined by more than 6,000 individuals at events in all 50 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, and Guam.  This is the first time a group this expansive and diverse will meet under a government charge is to double the rate of progress in our understanding, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care of cancer...

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Big Tech Should Stay Out of Healthcare

Matthew Buck | Washington Monthly | December 2, 2019

...The use of digital technology in health care has enormous promise, to be sure. But, as the Wall Street Journal's coverage of Google's Project Nightingale revealed, there is also a potential dark side to these projects. Ascension, it noted, "also hopes to mine data to identify additional tests that could be necessary or other ways in which the system could generate more revenue from patients, documents show." That detail raises a key question that's largely overlooked in our health care debates: should the drive to maximize corporate revenues determine how health information technology develops and becomes integrated into medical practice, or should that be determined by medical science and the public?...An alternative path exists. In the 1970s, the Veterans Affairs Administration (VA) developed VistA, an open-source code system that was the country's first EHR system... Read More »

Biohacking Healthcare - Part 2

Eric Valor | Forbes | September 18, 2012

One of the most valuable research tools is a model of the type of problem you are trying to solve. This allows for study of the problem mechanism and allows attempts at solving various parts of the problem without disrupting an actual patient or when such is unavailable... Read More »

Can Cable Companies Get Away With Being Hated? In Short, Yes

Peter Suciu | Fortune Magazine | June 11, 2014

High prices, poor customer service, a lackluster reliability of products: Customers despise their cable TV provider, but lack a sufficient alternative to cut the cord...

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Cloud Providers Reaffirm Commitment to Open Healthcare Interoperability During 2019 Blue Button Developers Conference

Press Release | HL7 | July 30, 2019

As healthcare evolves across the globe, so does our ability to improve the health and wellness of communities. Patients, providers, and health plans are striving for more value-based care, more engaging user experiences, and broader application of machine learning to assist clinicians in diagnosis and patient care. Too often, however, patient data are inconsistently formatted, incomplete, unavailable, or missing - which can limit access to the best possible care. Equipping patients and caregivers with information and insights derived from raw data has the potential to yield significantly better outcomes. But without a robust network of clinical information, even the best people and technology may not reach their potential...

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Cory Doctorow And EFF Aim To “Eradicate DRM In Our lifetime”

David Kravets | Ars Technica | January 20, 2015

...The Electronic Frontier Foundation announced Tuesday that Boing Boing's Cory Doctorow has been commissioned to tackle digital rights management technologies (DRM) that the rights group says threatens security, privacy, and undermines public rights and innovation...

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Cover Oregon Should Have Used Open-Source Software: Guest Opinion

John Miller | Oregon Live | March 3, 2014

To me, guest columnist Charles Jennings accurately represents the old school IT mentality - "No one ever got fired for buying IBM."  I couldn't gather from his essay whether he knows anything about modern software development methodology.

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Defense Department Needs to Embrace Open Source or Military Will Lose Tech Superiority

Ms. Smith | Network World | August 31, 2016

The Department of Defense needs to move past open source myths that have been debunked and jump on the open source bandwagon or the Department of Defense (DoD) and U.S. military will not be able to maintain tech superiority, warns a Center for a New American Security (CNAS) report. Open source software is used in the Pentagon, which should strongly suggest that open source is not an unsecure and vulnerable hot mess. Yet the DoD overall is stuck in the past, clinging to “erroneous and unfounded misunderstandings about open source software.” Those misconceptions often mean open source is not even considered as a viable option for DoD software projects...

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DoD Announces the Launch of “Code.mil,” an Experiment in Open Source

Press Release | U.S. Department of Defense | February 23, 2017

The Department of Defense (DoD) announced the launch of Code.mil, an open source initiative that allows software developers around the world to collaborate on unclassified code written by federal employees in support of DoD projects. DoD is working with GitHub, an open source platform, to experiment with fostering more collaboration between private sector software developers and federal employees on software projects built within the DoD. The Code.mil URL redirects users to an online repository that will house code written for a range of projects across DoD for individuals to review and make suggested changes...

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E-Book Ruling Gives Amazon An Advantage

David Streitfeld | New York Times | July 10, 2013

Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, loves disrupting markets. In that regard, he must be having a delightful summer. The book business, once so mired in the past it seemed part of the antiques trade, is up for grabs. Read More »

EHRs Inflict Enormous Pain on Doctors. It’ll Take More Than Stopwatches to Learn Why

Jonathan Bush | STAT | September 6, 2016

Electronic health records slow doctors down and distract them from meaningful face time caring for patients. That is the sad but unsurprising finding of a time and motion study published in Tuesday’s Annals of Internal Medicine1. A team of researchers determined that physicians are spending almost half of their time in the office on electronic health records (EHRs) and desk work and just 27 percent on face time with patients — which is what the vast majority of doctors went into medicine to do. Once they get home, they average another one to two hours completing EHRs...

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FCC Chairman Wheeler Is Just As Bad As We Thought He’d Be

Brad Reed | BGR | April 30, 2014

I begin with this premise because even if we take Wheeler’s statements at face value, he’s still showing a completely wrong-headed approach to regulation that I’ve long found disconcerting ever since I read his take on why AT&T should have been allowed to buy T-Mobile...

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FCC Eyes New Spectrum For Wi-Fi-Type Service

Bob Brewin | Nextgov | November 4, 2013

The Federal Communications Commission has kicked off a process to determine whether or not Globalstar Inc., which provides satellite phone service, can use a portion of its spectrum to offer terrestrial Wi-Fi-type service in the United States.

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FCC Proves Yet Again That It’s Out To Kill Net Neutrality

Art Brodsky | Wired | May 15, 2014

...FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, despite weeks of backlash, still wants to allow Internet Service Providers like Comcast and Verizon to “offer” different levels of service to internet companies, although he refused to call them a “fast lane” and a “slow lane” and refused to recognize how those arrangements up the food chain affect consumers and a neutral internet...

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FDA Issues RFQ for Large Scale EHR Study - Wants to Leverage VA's Open Source VistA EHR and Database for Research

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) yesterday issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for a large-scale electronic health record (EHR) system. This RFQ is very important as the objective is to develop a platform to support a critical project by the FDA's Division of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics (DBB) "to conduct research to assess the safety and surveillance of FDA regulated products through the FDA adverse event reporting systems..." Adverse drug reactions are one of the leading causes of death in the US, thus finding which drugs cause negative interactions is of vital importance. The project requires "use of the large electronic medical record (EMR) system..." The project is going to leverage the largest, most comprehensive, and clinically relevant medical records database, that of the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

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