HIV

See the following -

A Look Into The Future

Robert McQueen | The Tech | October 21, 2011

It’s now official: the information age will drastically change the world. Emerging technologies converged at MIT this week in a showcase to demonstrate how untapped industries could radically shape our future. Read More »

AMPATH Improving Care At Scale With ODK and OpenMRS

Yaw Anokwa | Open Data Kit | January 24, 2012

AMPATH is the one of the largest HIV treatment programs in sub-Saharan Africa and is Kenya's most comprehensive initiative to combat the virus. The program's catchment area has over 2 million people and provides care to more than 130,000 HIV-positive patients across 55 urban and rural clinics. To provide care at this scale, AMPATH has invested in tools like OpenMRS (an open source medical record system) and Open Data Kit, to help improve the efficiency and impact of their health providers.

Read More »

By 2050, Superbugs Will Kill 10 Million People A Year

Gwynn Guilford | Quartz | December 23, 2014

A scourge is emerging across the rich and poor worlds alike, one that will claim 10 million lives a year by mid-century. Watch out for the “superbugs”—pathogens that even antibiotics can’t kill...

Read More »

CrowdOutAIDS: Crowdsourcing a Solution

Mikaela Hildebrand | The Vancouver Sun | November 28, 2011

In response, policies are made and programmes put in place “for” young people. But young people rarely have a say. CrowdOutAIDS.org, UNAIDS new crowdsourcing project, turns that model on its head: it’s an online collaboration to rebuild the organization’s approach to HIV and young people from the bottom up. Through it, we want to find new ways to work with young people, across borders, for a shift on AIDS

Read More »

David Ho Highlights Launch of Bio-IT Asia Conference

Kevin Davies and Allison Proffitt | Bio-IT World | June 6, 2012

Ten years after the launch of the Bio-IT World Conference & Expo series in Boston, the conference made its debut in Asia in the sparkling Marina Bay Sands convention center. The trio of speakers who opened the three-day meeting was veteran HIV researcher David Ho, bio-IT consultant Chris Dagdigian, and AstraZeneca bioinformatician Yaron Turpaz.

Read More »

EMRs Help Boost HIV Care In Developing Countries

Bernie Monegain | Healthcare IT News | March 22, 2011

Electronic medical records improve the quality of care in developing countries, according to a new study conducted by researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and the schools of medicine at Indiana University and Moi University in Eldoret, Kenya. The study is one of the first to explore and demonstrate the impact of electronic record systems on quality of medical care in a developing country.

Read More »

Health Impact Fund—Raising Issues of Distribution, IP Rights And Alliances

Sakiko Fukuda-Parr and Proochista Ariana | Intellectual Property Watch | September 26, 2011

In this piece, the authors raise several issues with the public health financing proposal called the Health Impact Fund. It questions the relative distribution of costs and benefits; the persistent issue of intellectual property rights; as well as a lack of alliance with existing efforts to increase innovation of and access to essential medicines for the poor. Read More »

HIV History Suggests An Even More Paranoid Future For Ebola

Michael Byrne | Motherboard | October 19, 2014

HIV and the Ebola virus share some interesting and entirely sinister traits. One of those is extended incubation: Ebola can take up to three weeks to manifest as symptoms, while HIV can take years...

Read More »

How a Bee Sting Saved My Life: Testimony From a Lyme Disease Patient

Christie Wilcox | Truthout | November 18, 2015

Ellie Lobel was 27 when she was bitten by a tick and contracted Lyme disease. And she was not yet 45 when she decided to give up fighting for survival. Caused by corkscrew-shaped bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi, which enter the body through the bite of a tick, Lyme disease is diagnosed in around 300,000 people every year in the United States. It kills almost none of these people, and is by and large curable - if caught in time...

Read More »

Microsoft Donates Open Source Bio Project to Outercurve

Ryan McBride | Fierce Biotech IT | October 24, 2011

A host of academic and corporate life sciences groups have tapped .NET Bio tools, and project committers include Johnson & Johnson ($JNJ), sequencing powerhouse Illumina ($ILMN), Microsoft ($MSFT), Cornell University and the University of Queensland, the foundation said. Read More »

New Light-Activated Nanoparticles Kill Over 90% of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Peter Dockrill | Science Alert | January 19, 2016

Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a growing problem around the world, responsible for some 2 million infections in the US each year that lead to approximately 23,000 deaths. But a new nanoparticle treatment developed by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder could provide an effective means of fighting antibiotic-resistant bacteria including Salmonella, E. Coli, and Staphylococcus, based on results in a laboratory environment. In testing with a lab-grown culture, the nanoparticles killed 92 percent of drug-resistant bacterial cells while leaving the other cells intact...

Read More »

Open Source Software Helps Provide Healthcare Where It's Needed

Staff Writer | Enterprise DB | February 6, 2012

The benefits of open source software use are not restricted to up-and-coming businesses and forward-thinking municipal governments in the developed world. While it's great that the technology can provide a relief to stretched budgets in those cases, it can also provide much more critical assistance in developing countries, where IT systems can directly impact medical aid and other humanitarian efforts, according to a report from Wired magazine.

Read More »

The Charitable Face of Data Use

Tanzeel Akhtar | Marketing Week | November 10, 2011

When a massive earthquake hit Haiti in January 2010, the United Nations found that data collected through mobile telephones was crucial to delivering its relief programmes in the region. The UN Foundation’s vice president of communications Aaron Sherinian explains that - as demonstrated in Haiti - processing complex data sets is now vital for non-profit organisations to help everything fro Read More »

The Grim Propect of Antibiotic Resistance

Staff Writer | The Economist | May 21, 2016

When people hear about antibiotic resistance creating “superbugs”, they tend to think of new diseases and pandemics spreading out of control. The real threat is less flamboyant, but still serious: existing problems getting worse, sometimes dramatically. Infections acquired in hospital are a prime example. They are already a problem, but with more antibiotic resistance they could become a much worse one. Elective surgery, such as hip replacements, now routine, would come to carry what might be seen as unacceptable risk. So might Caesarean sections. The risks of procedures which suppress the immune system, such as organ transplants and cancer chemotherapies, would increase...

Read More »

Uganda Makes "Intentional Transmission" Of HIV A Crime

Elias Biryabarema | Reuters | May 14, 2014

Uganda has made it a crime to "wilfully and intentionally" transmit the HIV virus and made it legal for medical staff to disclose a patient’s HIV status to others without his or her consent.  The law was passed on Tuesday, a parliamentary spokeswoman said, in response to a resurgence in HIV infections in a country that was once hailed as a success in the global fight against AIDS...

Read More »