healthcare

See the following -

Why Not Medicaid For All?

Ross Douthat | New York Times | October 22, 2013

My Sunday column on the potential consequences of Obamacare’s botched rollout ended by sketching a scenario in which the program’s Medicaid expansion is deemed a success while its reform of the individual market leads to much-higher-than-expected costs and much-lower-than-expected participation rates. This combination would no doubt be politically helpful to the Republican Party in the short run, but (I argued) it would actually leave liberals with a fairly clear path forward... Read More »

Why Open Drug Discovery Needs Four Simple Rules For Licensing Data And Models

Antony J. Williams, John Wilbanks, and Sean Ekins | PLoS Computational Biology | September 27, 2012

As we see a future of increased database integration, the licensing of the data may be a hurdle that hampers progress and usability. We have formulated four rules for licensing data for open drug discovery, which we propose as a starting point for consideration by databases and for their ultimate adoption. Read More »

Why Open-Source Principles Are a Recipe For Innovation

April Burbank | Forbes | July 25, 2012

Open sourced software has proven that proprietary ownership often precludes innovation — and that with proper organization and oversight, you can trust the wisdom of the masses. But what does open sourcing look like in health care, government or everyday situations where there is no software code?

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Why Patients Will Soon Be Treated Like Valued Customers

John Casey | Axial Exchange | February 4, 2013

Why should hospitals and physicians get serious about the patient experience today? It’s good business! Read More »

Why Rate Shock Might Matter

Ross Douthat | New York Times | June 6, 2013

There has been a lengthy, multi-sided debate in the last week or so, with much ad hominem and gnashing of teeth, over whether California’s insurance premiums are going up because of Obamacare, and if so what that might mean for the law’s success or failure... Read More »

Why States Are Doing Obamacare Better

Sam Baker | Nextgov | October 24, 2013

A small—and somewhat surprising—handful of states are implementing Obamacare much more effectively than the Obama administration. Read More »

Why Take EHR Data Out Of Structured Format?

Neil Versel | InformationWeek Healthcare | January 14, 2013

HL7's conversion tool may seem counterproductive, but it's meant to encourage patients to use Blue Button. Read More »

Why The CDC Wants To Modernize Its Pathogen, Sequencing Informatics

Anthony Brino | Government Health IT | April 19, 2013

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is requesting $40 million in its fiscal year 2014 budget to build advanced molecular detection and informatics systems for tracking infectious disease outbreaks. Read More »

Why The EHR Market Is Poised For Disruption

Brian Eastwood | CIO | February 10, 2014

Simply put, 2014 is a big year for electronic health record vendors. They must adhere to stricter standards under the federal government's meaningful use program while convincing healthcare providers that they can meet future needs for information exchange, patient engagement and data analytics. Not everyone will make the cut. Read More »

Why The U.S. Is Worried About A Deadly Middle Eastern Virus

Jason Beaubien | Shots | April 24, 2014

The latest medical acronym to fear is MERS: Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. The virus has killed 83 people in the Arabian Gulf since first emerging in 2012 and now looks as if it could pose a global threat. Read More »

Why We Need To Keep Our Community Hospitals Strong

Chuck Lauer | Becker's Hospital Review | May 29, 2012

Community hospitals are under siege right now. Unlike large medical centers or hospital systems, they do not have the clout to qualify for the highest payor rates or the lowest vendor prices. And these self-standing, non-profit institutions have limited access to financing at a time when we're stuck in economic doldrums. Read More »

Why We Need To Treat America's Poorest Neighborhoods Like Developing Countries

Emily Badger | The Atlantic Cities | July 15, 2013

The average life expectancy in Japan right now, home to one of the healthiest, longest-living populations in the world, is about 83 years. That's four years longer than in the United States, a decade longer than in much of North Africa, and as many as 30 years longer than some war-torn parts of the world like Sierra Leone. Read More »

Why We're Still Waiting On The 'Yelpification' Of Health Care

Lindsay Abrams | Atlantic | October 18, 2012

Reviewing doctors -- what seems like a simple, effective way to empower and inform patients -- isn't so straightforward. Read More »

Why You Need Open Source For Health Exchange Success

Tim Yeaton | Wired | December 10, 2012

But whether the states build their own or rely on the federal government to create a HIX, time is in short supply.  By October 1, 2013, Exchanges must be ready for constituents to select health plans that will begin coverage January 1, 2014.  The pressure is on, and the question is: How can states build these Exchanges in time and without overspending? The answer is open source software (OSS) and open source-style collaborative development.
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Why Your Doctor Feels Like A 'Beaten Dog'

Daniela Drake | The Daily Beast | September 11, 2014

Assembly-line patient visits, poor care for the chronically ill, stacks of paperwork, and endless red tape: This is the life of the American physician...

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