GNOME

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7 Questions To Ask Any Open Source Project

Simon Phipps | InfoWorld | January 21, 2015

Whether you're starting an open source project or deciding whether to participate in one, you don't want to waste time in an endeavor that imposes arbitrary restrictions that will stop you in your tracks down the line...

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A New Android App for Teaching Kids How to Read

Have you been looking for software to help your child to read? Well, your quest may be over. Phoenicia is a new literacy application for Android developed by Michael Hall, an open source software developer, community manager, and technology evangelist currently working at Canonical, maker of Ubuntu. In this interview, he talks about the diagnosis of his oldest child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, his learning curve of Android development, and why user testing matters more than you think...

Do We Still Need The FSF, GNU and GPL?

Glyn Moody | The H Open | June 13, 2011

It's easy to take things for granted – to assume that the world will always be as it is. And then sometimes you receive a mild jolt: some new information appears that makes you sit up and reconsider your preconceptions. Here's one jolt I received recently: Read More »

GNOME 3.6 Released

Press Release | Gnome Foundation News | September 26, 2012

“The GNOME Foundation is proud to present this latest GNOME release, and I would like to congratulate the GNOME community on its achievement”, said Andreas Nilsson, President of the GNOME Foundation. “I am especially happy about our advancements in accessibility and internationalization with this release. GNOME 3.6 is an important milestone in our mission to bring a free and open computing environment to everyone.” Read More »

GNOME's Sandler: Is there a killer in the code?

Paula Rooney | ZDNet | September 25, 2011

Imagine if your life depended on software –and the source code was proprietary? That’s the dilemma faced by recently-appointed GNOME executive director Karen Sandler. who was diagnosed with a serious heart condition in 2006 that required the implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator. Read More »

How To Get Started In Open Source

Selena Larson | ReadWrite | October 10, 2014

...[O]pen source communities can be unfriendly—sometimes even intimidating—to newcomers and outsiders. That might be especially true for women and people of color, who appear to be woefully underrepresented in open source...

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The New Learning Center, Free eBooks, And More

Jen Wike | OpenSource.com | April 25, 2014

Opensource.com focused on stories about open source tools and systems for libraries and other open educational content from April 14 - 18. And before you curl up with your favorite book, we've got new eBooks for you to download and some discoveries from our Open Library Week that you'll want to bookmark—or 3D print.

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Top 10 Linux News Stories of 2016

They grow up so quickly. It's hard to believe that 25 years ago Linus Torvalds announced to the comp.os.minix Usenet group that he was "doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones." Since 1991, Linux has grown beyond even Torvalds' dreams. It's not a stretch to say that Linux is everywhere. Corporations large and small use Linux, and it powers computers, mobile devices, and connected hardware. Critical infrastructure relies on the stability and flexibility of Linux...

When Should Open Source Be Written Into Law?

Jon Buys | Ostatic | January 22, 2012

I would suggest three areas of software which should be available upon request, without question. 1. Medical Implants. Unequivocally, any programmable electronic device which we put into our bodies should be available for review...

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Who Writes Linux? Corporations, More Than Ever

Serdar Yegulalp | InfoWorld | February 3, 2014

Linux Foundation report shows for-profit companies provide 80-plus percent of kernel patches, with big role for mobile hardware developers Read More »

​Open Invention Network Expands Open-Source Patent Protection Beyond Linux

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols | ZD Net | May 9, 2017

Today, everyone and their uncle -- yes, even Microsoft-- use Linux and open-source. A decade ago, Linux was under attack by SCO for imaginary copyright violations, and then Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer was claiming that Linux violated more than 200 of Microsoft's patents. So Open Invention Network (OIN) patent consortium was formed to defend Linux against intellectual property (IP) attacks. The stakes may not be so high today, but Linux and open-source software is still under attack from patent trolls and other attackers...

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