encryption

See the following -

How Microsoft Handed The NSA Access To Encrypted Messages

Glenn Greenwald, Ewen MacAskill, Laura Poitras, et. al. | The Guardian | July 11, 2013

Microsoft has collaborated closely with US intelligence services to allow users' communications to be intercepted, including helping the National Security Agency to circumvent the company's own encryption, according to top-secret documents [...]. Read More »

How To Break Out Of PRISM

Simon Phipps | InfoWorld | June 14, 2013

NSA scandal has exploded fears of being watched on the Internet, but a new website lists ways to escape the Panopticon Read More »

Let’s Build A More Secure Internet

Eli Dourado | New York Times | October 8, 2013

[...] In the wake of the disclosures about the National Security Agency’s surveillance programs, considerable attention has been focused on the agency’s collaboration with companies like Microsoft, Apple and Google, which according to leaked documents appear to have programmed “back door” encryption weaknesses into popular consumer products and services like Hotmail, iPhones and Android phones. Read More »

Microsoft Allowed the NSA Access to Skype, Skydrive and Outlook

Katie Collins | Wired | July 12, 2013

Microsoft colluded with the NSA by handing over access to encrypted messages, files seen by the Guardian reveal. The company helped the agency circumvent encryption and gain access to web chats, email and cloud storage. Read More »

Microsoft Asks Attorney General To Release Gag Order On NSA Spying

Gregory Ferenstein | TechCrunch | July 16, 2013

Microsoft is tired of getting pummeled in the press over reports that it hands over emails and Skype conversations to the National Security Agency. [...] Read More »

NSA Said To Collect Millions Of E-mail Address Books, Chat Lists

Steven Musil | CNET | October 14, 2013

Collection occurs when Internet services transmit the data during routine activity such as composing a message, The Washington Post reports. Read More »

NSA's Crypto Betrayal: Good News For Open Source?

Glyn Moody | Computerworld | September 10, 2013

Revelations from documents obtained by whistleblower Edward Snowden that GCHQ essentially downloads the entire Internet as it enters and leaves the UK, and stores big chunks of it, was bad enough. But last week we learned that the NSA has intentionally weakened just about every aspect of online encryption [...]. Read More »

Patient-Centered Security Program

Andy Oram | EMR & HIPPA | August 29, 2016

Andy OramThe HIMSS report certainly appears comprehensive to a traditional security professional.They ask about important things–encryption, multi-factor authentication, intrusion detection, audits–and warn the industry of breaches caused by skimping on such things. But before we spend several billion dollars patching the existing system, let’s step back and ask what our priorities are. It’s a long-held tenet of the security field that the most common source of breaches is internal: employees who were malicious themselves, or who mistakenly let intruders in through phishing attacks or other exploits. That’s why (you might notice) I don’t use the term “cybersecurity” in this article, even though it’s part of the title of the HIMSS report.

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Patient-Centered Security Program (Part 2)

Andy Oram | EMR & HIPPA | August 30, 2016

Andy Oram

The previous part of this article laid down a basic premise that the purpose of security isto protect people, not computer systems or data. Let’s continue our exploration of internal threats. This is a policy issue that calls for involvement by a wide range of actors throughout society, of course. Policy-makers have apparently already decided that it is socially beneficial–or at least the most feasible course economically–for clinicians to share data with partners helping them with treatment, operations, or payment. There are even rules now requiring those partners to protect the data. Policy-makers have further decided that de-identified data sharing is beneficial to help researchers and even companies using it to sell more treatments. 

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Researcher Argues For Open Hardware To Defend Against NSA Spying

Antone Gonsalves | CSO | October 10, 2013

While there is no foolproof defense against government spying, snooping by entities like the National Security Agency could be made far more difficult through the use of Internet infrastructure built on open-source hardware, an academic researcher says. Read More »

The Google File System Makes NSA’s Hack Blatantly Illegal And They Know It

Robert X. Cringely | I, Cringely | November 2, 2013

The latest Edward Snowden bombshell that the National Security Agency has been hacking foreign Google and Yahoo data centers is particularly disturbing. Plenty has been written about it so I normally wouldn’t comment except that the general press has, I think, too shallow an understanding of the technology involved. The hack is even more insidious than they know. Read More »

The Rise Of Medical Identity Theft

Michael Ollove | The Pew | February 7, 2014

If modern technology has ushered in a plague of identity theft, one particular strain of the disease has emerged as most virulent: medical identity theft. Read More »

Tomorrow’s Surveillance: Everyone, Everywhere, All The Time

Jon Evans | TechCrunch | June 29, 2013

Everyone is worried about the wrong things. Since Edward Snowden exposed the incipient NSA panopticon, the civil libertarians are worried that their Internet conversations and phone metadata are being tracked; the national-security conservatives claim to be worried that terrorists will start hiding their tracks; but both sides should really be worried about different things entirely. Read More »

UK's Security Branch Says Ubuntu Most Secure End-User OS

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols | ZDNet | January 17, 2014

CESG, the UK government's arm that assesses operating systems and software security, has published its findings for ‘End User Device’ operating systems. The most secure of the lot? Ubuntu 12.04. Read More »

Why the Operating System Matters Even More in 2017

Operating systems don't quite date back to the beginning of computing, but they go back far enough. Mainframe customers wrote the first ones in the late 1950s, with operating systems that we'd more clearly recognize as such today—including OS/360 from IBM and Unix from Bell Labs—following over the next couple of decades. An operating system performs a wide variety of useful functions in a system, but it's helpful to think of those as falling into three general categories. First, the operating system sits on top of a physical system and talks to the hardware. This insulates application software from many hardware implementation details...