United Nations (UN)

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Nobel Laureates’ Publications Made Open Access In SPIE Digital Library

Press Release | SPIE | October 10, 2014

Nobel Prizes announced this week in Physics and Chemistry demonstrate photonics as a “powerful, enabling technology that drives innovation and discovery and stimulates new fields,” noted leaders of SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. The society is making research papers by the six recipients published in the SPIE Digital Library freely accessible through the end of 2014...

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Open Source for Humanitarian Action

Brandon Keim | Stanford Social Innovation Review | December 1, 2012

In the days following the Jan. 10, 2010, earthquake in Haiti, chaos prevailed. Transportation was limited, if not impossible. Lines of communication were broken. A few radio stations continued to broadcast, but the disaster’s scale was overwhelming. Only one form of mass communication remained relatively intact: cellular phones. Even before the disaster, there had been only 108,000 landbased telephone lines in the country, compared with 3.5 million mobile phones. After the earthquake, mobile communications, particularly text messages, were one of the few means by which people could report their needs and location...

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Personal Connected Health Alliance To Bring mHealth Worldwide

Jennifer Bresnick | EHR Intelligence | April 23, 2014

The Personal Connected Health Alliance (PCHA), a collaboration between HIMSS, Continua Health Alliance, and the mHealth Summit, officially launched this week with a mission to bring wearable health tracking devices, mHealth apps, mobile sensors, and other personal technologies to as wide an audience of patient-consumers as possible.  The Alliance hopes to promote the adoption, standardization, and necessary regulation of mHealth technologies, while empowering individuals to take charge of their own health.

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Refusing To Share: How The West Created BRICS New Development Bank

Roslyn Fuller | RT News | July 21, 2014

...The recent creation of the New Development Bank by the BRICS nations (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa), which will compete with the IMF and World Bank, is yet another example of how international control is skittering away from those nations that are failing to adapt to a changing world...

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Rethink the School of Tomorrow: Africa as the Starting Hypothesis

Stéphan-Eloïse Gras and the Africa 4 Tech team | LinkedIn | July 8, 2016

With 200 million inhabitants between the ages of 15 and 24, Africa is today the youngest continent on the planet. These young Africans will be the future leaders and the driving force of the continent’s economic, social and cultural development. A well-functioning inclusive educational system is thus essential to tackle tomorrow’s challenges. For several years, governments and large institutions on the planet, have attempted to implement an educational system relevant to the continent’s challenges. Considerable efforts have been made to catch up on an accumulated backlog in this crucial sector, allowing to tremendously enhance access to primary education...

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Revealed: The World's Most & Least Advanced Countries

Matthew Bishop | LinkedIn | April 4, 2014

UNTIL recently, the popular way to compare the progress of one country relative to another was to use the size of their economies. America had the biggest GDP (and almost the biggest per capita GDP), so it stood to reason it was the most advanced country in the world.

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Senate Panel Approves Internet Freedom Resolution

Josh Smith | Nextgov | September 20, 2012

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Wednesday unanimously approved a resolution calling on the United States to prevent the United Nations from having a greater role in governing the Internet. Read More »

Slow Ebola Response Blamed On False Assumptions About Its Course

Steven Ross Johnson | Modern Healthcare | September 17, 2014

Health experts and humanitarian organizations waging war against the deadly Ebola outbreak in West Africa hope plans announced Tuesday by the Obama Administration to send additional aid to affected regions will encourage more philanthropic support and health worker recruitment. Both money and volunteers have come in at a slower pace in this crisis than in past disasters...

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South Asia floods: Appeals for Help as Monsoon Rains Cause Havoc in India, Nepal, Bangladesh

James Bennett | ABC News | August 31, 2017

Oxfam said its Bangladesh staff reported two-thirds of the country was under water and in some areas the flooding was the worst since 1988, creating an urgent demand for humanitarian supplies. Widescale flooding in an arc stretching across the Himalayan foothills caused landslides and washed away tens of thousands of homes and vast swathes of farmland. The UN said about 40 million had been affected...

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Special Report - The World Health Organization's Critical Challenge: Healing Itself

Kate Kelland | Reuters | February 8, 2016

For years the WHO has talked about streamlining its complex structure, governance and financing to make it more efficient. Critics say the organisation needs deep reforms to allow it to show clear leadership in promoting health and to respond decisively to disease emergencies that may span many countries. But progress has been painfully slow...

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Strengthening The Health Workforce through eHealth Innovation: Reflections From The GETHealth Summit

Kate Tulenko | CapacityPlus | March 1, 2013

I recently had the privilege of representing CapacityPlus at the Global Education and Technology Health (GETHealth) Summit at the United Nations in New York City, speaking in sessions on distance learning in rural communities and leveraging social media to address the global health workforce gap. Read More »

Study Suggests Wi-Fi Exposure More Dangerous To Kids Than Previously Thought

Robert J. Szczerba | Forbes.com | January 13, 2015

...he International Agency for Research on Cancer (IRIC), part of the United Nations’ World Health Organization (WHO), classifies these and more than 250 other agents as Class 2B Carcinogens – possibly carcinogenic to humans.  Another entry on that same list is radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF/EMF)...

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Study: Over 1.4 Billion Jobs and Food Supplied Worldwide Depend on Saving Bees

Press Release | University of Reading | November 28, 2016

World food supplies and jobs are at risk unless urgent action is taken to stop global declines of pollinators, leading scientists have warned. The authors of a landmark United Nations report on pollinator decline - including from the University of Reading, University of East Anglia and Centre for Ecology and Hydrology in the UK - blame loss of habitat, climate change and farming changes for the falls. Building ‘bee highways', reducing so-called green deserts, and helping farmers work with nature could all help, the researchers say in a new report...

Sugar Can harm Like Alcohol and Tobacco; Regulate It, Article Says

Karen Kaplan | Los Angeles Times | February 1, 2012

In a provocative commentary coming out in Thursday’s edition of the journal Nature, Dr. Robert Lustig and two colleagues from UC San Francisco argue that the added sugars in processed foods and drinks are responsible for so many cases of chronic disease and premature deaths that their use ought to be regulated, just like alcohol and tobacco.

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The @UN Deputy Secretary-General Writes About Why Toilets Matter

Jan Eliasson | Elsevier Connect | April 8, 2014

Why do toilets matter? They matter because they prevent disease and malnutrition, helping children to survive and thrive, communities to flourish and nations to prosper. Every dollar spent on sanitation brings a five-fold return in health and productivity. That is why, community by community, town by town, country by country, we need action to provide sanitation for all. Read More »