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How DOD Embraced Bug Bounties -- And How Your Agency Can, Too

Sarah Lai Stirland | FCW | October 24, 2016

It was a Tuesday in April, and Mark Litchfield was poking around the Defense Department's Defense Video Imagery Distribution System, looking for security holes. It didn't take him long to find one. He soon uncovered a vulnerability known as a blind persistent cross-site script. It could enable any maliciously minded hacker to log in as a site administrator and broadcast whatever content he or she wanted from the DVIDS website -- which is the primary way the U.S. military keeps the public informed about its activities around the world...

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How Does FHIR Fit into Recent Interoperability Initiatives?

Sara Heath | Health IT Interoperability | May 18, 2016

Over the past few months, APIs have been the talk of the healthcare industry, pushing HL7's FHIR into the spotlight for interoperability. Plenty of talk supports the position that application programming interfaces (APIs) will enhance health data interoperability, particularly a leading API standard known as FHIR. Health Level 7’s Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resource (FHIR) is a data standard that helps different health applications work on the different interfaces that exist in the industry (such as an Epic Systems or a Cerner interface)...

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Hurricane Irma Just Made a Digital Walkie-Talkie the No. 1 App Online

Peter Holley | Houston Chronicle | September 6, 2017

As Hurricane Harvey dropped anchor over Southeast Texas last week, Zello became the go-to app for rescuers working to save thousands of people trapped by floodwaters. Within days of Harvey's arrival, the app saw a 20-fold increase in usage in Houston, according to Bill Moore, the Austin based startup's the chief executive. As Hurricane Irma hurtles across the Caribbean toward the coast of Florida, Zello continues to boom in popularity. The free Internet "walkie-talkie" app - which relies on cellphone data plans or WiFi and is designed to operate in places where signals are weak - became the top app on iTunes and Google Play Wednesday...

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IBM Tries To Put Twitter In Patent Cage

Brian Proffitt | ReadWrite | November 5, 2013

This may have been the day that IBM actually started to look desperate. In an update to its S-1 filing prior to its initial public offering some time this week, Twitter somewhat casually revealed that IBM has notified the social media company that it is infringing on three of IBM's patents. Read More »

Increase in International Cyber Attacks Calls for National Testbed

HSD Foundation | The Hague Security Delta | October 24, 2016

On Friday 21st of October The United States was subjected to massive and widespread cyberattacks which disrupted website domains and internet traffic through DDoS attacks. DDoS attacks flood websites with traffic and impairs normal services. "The massive outage drew the attention of the FBI which said Friday that it was "investigating all potential causes" of the attack." Popular websites like Twitter, Amazon, Spotify and Netflix went down for some users on Friday...

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Inside Obama's Stealth Startup

Jon Gertner | Fast Company | June 15, 2015

The new hub of Washington’s tech insurgency is something known as the U.S. Digital Service, which is headquartered in a stately brick townhouse half a block from the White House. USDS -employees tend to congregate with their laptops at a long table at the back half of the parlor floor. If there’s no room, they retreat downstairs to a low-ceilinged basement, sprawling on cushioned chairs. Apart from an air-hockey table, there aren’t many physical reminders of West Coast startup culture—a lot of the new techies are issued BlackBerrys, which seems to cause them near-physical pain...

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Is Facebook The World's Largest Open Source Company?

Matt Asay | ReadWrite | October 17, 2013

Red Hat used to wear the open source crown. Then Google. But Facebook and other web giants now contribute the most to open source. Read More »

Linux Whips Apple's macOS in the Race to the Automobile CarOS

I don't think much about it while I'm driving, but I sure do love that my car is equipped with a system that lets me use a few buttons and my voice to call my wife, mom, and children. That same system allows me to choose whether I listen to music streaming from the cloud, satellite radio, or the more traditional AM/FM radio. I also get weather updates and can direct my in-vehicle GPS to find the fastest route to my next destination. In-vehicle infotainment, or IVI as it's known in the industry, has become ubiquitous in today's newest automobiles...

Mapping America's Illnesses, In Near Real-Time

John Metcalfe | The Atlantic Cities | February 10, 2012

People in Seattle are suffering from coughing and the flu. Headaches and fevers are going around in Washington, D.C. [...] All this drippy, wheezy intelligence, possibly accurate or possibly not, comes courtesy of SickWeather, a website that attempts to crowdsource the health of cities around the world. (Motto: “Say It, Don't Spray It”). Read More »

MIT Map Offers Real-Time, Crowd-Sourced Flood Reporting during Hurricane Irma

Press Release | Massachusetts Institute of Technology | September 8, 2017

As Hurricane Irma bears down on the U.S., the MIT Urban Risk Lab has launched a free, open-source platform that will help residents and government officials track flooding in Broward County, Florida. The platform, RiskMap.us, is being piloted to enable both residents and emergency managers to obtain better information on flooding conditions in near-real time...

Mozilla Brings Firefox OS-Powered Smartphones In Bangladesh

Staff Writer | The Daily Star | September 22, 2014

Mozilla, a pioneer in Web platforms, introduces the Firefox operating system for smartphones in Bangladesh, in cooperation with Grameenphone and device partner Symphony. Customers of Bondhu, Grameenphone’s youth offer, will be able to enjoy range of benefits on Firefox OS, including 20MB of free Internet per day...

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New Data Sources Fuel Understanding of Public Health Emergencies

Kathleen Hickey | GCN | September 20, 2016

Remember when Google search results were first used to predict the flu? Now, data from mobile phones, social media and even grocery scanners has been shown to be effective at identifying patterns in epidemics. Standard travel data collection methods, however, are limited and often provide outdated data. Mobile phones, on the other hand, are nearly ubiquitous, and can serve as a rich data resource. Call data, which automatically provides time and location details, can help in understanding human mobility...

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News Participation Starts At ‘Home’

Trevor Knoblich | FrontlineSMS | November 16, 2012

Seemingly every major news event worldwide is heightening participation in news. People are eager to share updates and photos of an unfolding news event, ask questions of media outlets, and share important information. But there are two important aspects to this type of participation [...]. In other words, people write about their immediate world using their ‘home’ or go-to platform. Read More »

No Longer Why Open Source, But How To Do Open Source

Mark Hinkle | Open Source Delivers | May 7, 2014

Fifteen years ago I spent a good deal of my time evangelizing open source software...Today I spend more time educating perspective open source participants on how they can leverage open source to reduce development costs, improve operational efficiency and drive customization for their own purposes.

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Open Knowledge And Data Festival: Data Journalism And Visualization Session

Anahi Ayala Iacucci | Internews | September 20, 2012

Let us be honest: the Data Journalism and Visualization session at the Open Knowledge and Data Festival was aimed at an elite audience. Read More »