cybersecurity

See the following -

FDA Partners with Sensato-ISAO and H-ISAC to Create Open Source Cybersecurity Intelligence Network and Resource

Press Release | Sensato, Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Health Information Sharing and Analysis Center (H-ISAC) | October 9, 2018

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) has officially executed a tri-lateral agreement between the FDA, the Health Information Sharing and Analysis Center (H-ISAC) and the Sensato-Information Sharing and Analysis Organization (Sensato-ISAO), Sensato announced today. The goal of the agreement is "to ensure that essential medical device or healthcare cybersecurity vulnerability information can be shared with all stakeholders within the HPH Sector, including those who are not members of H-ISAC and Sensato-ISAO," according to a statement from the FDA. "This collaboration will help inform a common understanding of that risk threshold upon which exploit of a vulnerability might impact on patient safety and/or public health."

Read More »

Federal CIO On Adopting Emerging Technologies

Eric Chabrow | GovInfoSecurity.com | February 24, 2013

U.S. Federal Chief Information Officer Steven VanRoekel says he likes to make this point in his speeches: "The securest data center is the one that's unplugged from the network, but that's not going to get you the service that you need." Read More »

Federal CIO Outlines Next Steps

J. Nicholas Hoover | InformationWeek | February 21, 2013

With Obama's first term in the rearview mirror, federal CIO Steven VanRoekel is looking for ways to continue to improve federal IT even in the face of looming budget cuts. Read More »

Federal CIO Outlines Second-Term IT Priorities

Patience Wait | InformationWeek | January 24, 2013

Amid continued cost cutting, the White House will seek to drive innovation, ROI and cybersecurity. Read More »

Federal IT Budget To Increase In 2014

Patience Wait | InformationWeek | April 11, 2013

Federal IT spending will increase nearly 2%, to $82 billion, in the fiscal 2014 budget submitted by the White House on Wednesday. It's the first significant increase in federal IT spending in four years. Read More »

Feds Investigating Two Dozen Potential Hacks Targeting Life-Saving Medical Devices

Staff Writer | RT USA | October 22, 2014

A senior official at the Department of Homeland Security tells Reuters that government experts are now investigating upwards of two dozen instances in which high-tech medical products may be prone to hackers...

Read More »

Feds Need to Start Thinking Like Hackers

Aliya Sternstein | Nextgov | January 30, 2012

The government should and will continue to invest billions of dollars annually in protecting federal networks, despite economic uncertainty, according to administration officials. Maybe even because of economic uncertainty, funding will be retained. Read More »

Feds Not Authorized to Deal with Electric Grid Disruptions

Aliya Sternstein | Nextgov | February 2, 2012

The federal government does not have the legal authority to contain computer network meltdowns capable of roiling society and will not obtain that power until at least 2013, said a cybersecurity researcher who advises Congress and the Obama administration.

Read More »

Five Critical Cyber Questions For The Next DHS Chief

Jessica R. Herrera-Flanigan | Nextgov | July 12, 2013

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano's announcement today that she plans to leave the department raises interesting questions for what is next for the government's cybersecurity efforts. Read More »

Forced Exposure

Pamela Jones | Groklaw | August 20, 2013

The owner of Lavabit tells us that he's stopped using email and if we knew what he knew, we'd stop too. There is no way to do Groklaw without email. Therein lies the conundrum. What to do? Read More »

Forget The Sony Hack, This Could Be The Biggest Cyber Attack Of 2015

Patrick Tucker | Defense One | December 19, 2014

...[A]ccording to cyber-security professionals, the Sony hack may be a prelude to a cyber attack on United States infrastructure that could occur in 2015, as a result of a very different, self-inflicted document dump from the Department of Homeland Security in July...

Read More »

Global Group Communication and Culture Tips

If open source needed a new slogan it whould be: Think Globally, Act Globally. Probably with a semicolon instead of a comma, but what slogan uses a semicolon? A semicolon is slogan poison. Just like thinking locally is open source poison. The thing is, when you create a tool you need and decide to throw a Creative Commons license on it to allow others to add to it or make fun of your lousy source code, you can't be thinking locally. You know that it will now reach anywhere and everywhere. And, if you didn't realize that, then you're probably on a different Internet than me...

Groups Warn of Privacy Concerns in Cybersecurity Bills

Josh Smith | Nextgov | February 9, 2012

Civil liberties groups are on the Hill Thursday to warn of the dangers they say cybersecurity proposals could pose to privacy and other civil rights.

The Senate is expected to introduce comprehensive cybersecurity legislation any day and the House has moved forward with several bills designed to increase information sharing between the government and private companies. Read More »

Guardtime Secures Over a Million Estonian Healthcare Records on the Blockchain

Bylan Allison | IBTimes | March 3, 2016

Guardtime, a cyber-security provider that uses blockchain systems to ensure the integrity of data, is partnering with the Estonian e-Health Authority to secure over a million health care records. Guardtime uses Keyless Signature Infrastructure (KSI), a blockchain technology that provides massive-scale data authentication without reliance on centralised trust authorities. Unlike traditional approaches that depend on asymmetric key cryptography, KSI uses only hash-function cryptography, allowing verification to rely only on the security of hash functions and the availability of a public ledger...

Read More »

Guess What: Docs Don't Like EHRs

It's kind of "dog-bites-man" type news, but there is even more evidence that physicians not only don't think EHRs are helping them but actually see them as contributing to burnout. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that use of EHRs (or computerized physician order entries -- CPOEs) was associated with lower satisfaction with time spent on clerical tasks, with nearly half of physicians saying the amount of time spent on clerical tasks was unreasonable.  No wonder the AMA CEO recently complained that physicians were turning into the "most expensive data entry force on the face of the planet."