University of Washington

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How Computers Broke Science – and What We Can Do To Fix It

For most of the history of science, researchers have reported their methods in a way that enabled independent reproduction of their results. But, since the introduction of the personal computer – and the point-and-click software programs that have evolved to make it more user-friendly – reproducibility of much research has become questionable, if not impossible. Too much of the research process is now shrouded by the opaque use of computers that many researchers have come to depend on. This makes it almost impossible for an outsider to recreate their results. Recently, several groups have proposed similar solutions to this problem. Together they would break scientific data out of the black box of unrecorded computer manipulations so independent readers can again critically assess and reproduce results. Researchers, the public, and science itself would benefit.

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Is the Grace Hopper Open Source Day 2015 a Turning Point for Open Health and Humanitarian Open Source Projects?

One of the most significant efforts to help open health and humanitarian open source apps seen to date will be taking place tomorrow in Houston, Texas. The event is the Open Source Day 2015, part of the annual Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing (GHC) a conference designed to bring the research and career interests of women in computing to the forefront. The full-day Code-A-Thon is focused on “coding for humanitarian causes in a dynamic, collaborative environment.” This day will give “women from around the world the chance to learn how to contribute to the open source community, regardless of their skill or experience level.”

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Open Medical Records Community Supports New System In Mozambique

The southern African country of Mozambique suffers under the most extreme challenges for resource-poor countries: economic instability, political strife, civil unrest, corruption and crime, unreliable infrastructure (such as transportation and telecommunications), and a large-scale HIV epidemic that has yet to be declared under control...The nation has enormous need and opportunity for improving its healthcare system and the lives of its residents. In the face of their crisis, Mozambique is working to equip its medical clinics across the nation with an electronic medical records system (EMR). Mozambique believes an EMR can empower clinicians to give high-quality and consistent care to those most in need, while allowing the country to reap the insights of comprehensive reporting for responsive public health decision making...

Promoting Earthquake Readiness

Harvey V. Fineberg | Washington Monthly | July 1, 2016

In Oregon, Washington State and California, an early warning system helps citizens and officials better prepare for and respond to earthquakes. In the early morning hours on August 24, 2014, scientists at UC Berkeley received a “ShakeAlert” – an alarm providing warning of a pending earthquake. Five seconds later, the city of Napa felt a magnitude 6.0 earthquake. That five-second warning was an early success for a broader goal: the creation of an earthquake early warning system that can communicate the size, extent and timing of imminent earthquakes on the West Coast...

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Sharing Your Internet Connection as a Humanitarian Act

uProxy is a browser extension that lets you share your Internet connection with people living in repressive societies. Much of the world lives in countries that severely censor and restrict Internet access. uProxy makes it a little easier to bring the free and open Internet to some of the darkest corners of the world. How does it work? Find out in this interview with Lucy He, Raymond Cheng, and Salome Vakhtangadze. Lucy and Salome are engineers at Google Ideas, a team at Google that builds tools against oppression. Raymond is a core developer for uProxy and PhD student at the University of Washington, where uProxy is being developed. Together they talk a bit about the future of uProxy and plans for the Open Source Day codeathon taking place during Grace Hopper's Open Source Day later this year...

Surgical Robots to Provide Open-Source Platform for Medical Robotics Research

Hannah Hickey | HealthCanal.com | January 12, 2012

In a basement on the University of Washington campus perch seven identical robots. Named Raven, each has two winglike arms that end in tiny claws designed to perform surgery on a simulated patient. Read More »

The Really Big One

Kathryn Schulz | The New Yorker | July 20, 2016

An earthquake will destroy a sizable portion of the coastal Northwest. The question is when. Most people in the United States know just one fault line by name: the San Andreas, which runs nearly the length of California and is perpetually rumored to be on the verge of unleashing “the big one.” That rumor is misleading, no matter what the San Andreas ever does. Just north of the San Andreas, however, lies another fault line...

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OpenMRS Worldwide Summit 2015 [Updated]

Event Details
Type: 
Conference
Date: 
December 8, 2015 (All day) - December 14, 2015 (All day)
Location: 
Singapore Management University (SMU) Singapore
Singapore

OpenMRS Inc., the non-profit organization supporting the OpenMRS community, is hosting a new annual global gathering of contributors called OpenMRS Worldwide Summit, focused on building and growing both our community and our software. While our OpenMRS Implementers Meetings will continue to bring together OpenMRS implementers & health care professionals to focus on how OpenMRS is used, the annual Worldwide Summit will bring together OpenMRS people of all types, and will offer them opportunities to share their work, as well as discuss how software will evolve in the coming year. The first OpenMRS Summit is happening 8-14 December 2015 in Singapore. Read on for more information about the schedule and logistics.

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