News Clips

How Is Open Source Enhancing Healthcare

Audrey Throne | Open Source For U | May 23, 2017

With the recent development in software technology, many application systems are now competing for medical attention. Healthcare (or what we can call it as medical software) is evolving rapidly through communications, record-keeping system to a source of decision support, consequently, playing an active role in clinical service. However, unlike many other services, medical software is not very well regulated and places like a safety burden and cost of ineffective use solely depend on the physicians...

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4 Ways Blockchain Is the New Business Collaboration Tool

Lucas Mearian | Computer World | May 23, 2017

While blockchain may have cut its teeth on the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, the distributed electronic ledger technology is quickly making inroads across a variety of industries. That's mainly because of its innate security and its potential for improving systems  operations all while reducing costs and creating new revenue streams. This year, blockchain technology is expected to become a key business focus for many industries, according to a Deloitte survey conducted late last year...

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IBM and the tranSMART Foundation Bring Translational Medicine Data to Scientists

Press Release | tranSmart Foundation | May 23, 2017

The tranSMART Foundation, a non-profit organization providing a global, open-source, open-data knowledge management platform for scientists to share pre-competitive translational research data, and IBM (NYSE: IBM), today announced their collaboration and the general availability of the tranSMART platform (version 16.2) on IBM Power8 servers. The translational research platform is running on IBM Power8 servers at the tranSMART Foundation's Center of Excellence at the University of Michigan. This new implementation allows users to take advantage of the optimized performance enabling them to more quickly and easily load and analyze data...

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A Global Health Scorecard Finds U.S. Lacking

Donald G.McNeil Jr. | The New York Times | May 22, 2017

Over the last 25 years, China, Ethiopia, the Maldive Islands, Peru, South Korea and Turkey had the greatest improvements in “deaths avoidable through health care at their economic level,” a complex but intriguing new measure of global mortality described last week in the Lancet. By that standard, the United States improved slightly over the same period, 1990 to 2015. But the American ranking is still so low that it’s “an embarrassment, especially considering the U.S. spends $9,000 per person on health care annually,” said the report’s chief author, Dr. Christopher J. L. Murray, director of the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, created by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

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‘An Embarrassment’: U.S. Health Care Far from the Top in Global Study

Ariana Eunjung Cha | The Washington Post | May 18, 2017

Americans grumble all the time about the quality of our health-care system, but when we're dealing with serious issues, such as injuries from an auto accident or cancer, we often count our blessings that we live in a wealthy country that has well-trained doctors with access to the latest medical technology. Yet those factors don't always correlate with staying alive. That's the distressing finding from a global study of what researchers call “amenable mortality,” or deaths that theoretically could have been avoided by timely and effective medical care...

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Scenarios for Health Care Reform (Part 2 of 2)

Andy Oram | EMR and HIPAA | May 18, 2017

Some health care providers balk at the requirement to share data, but their legal and marketing teams explain that they have been doing it for years already with companies whose motives are less commendable. Increasingly, the providers are won over. The analytics service appeals particularly to small, rural, and safety-net providers. Hammered by payment cuts and growing needs among their populations, they are on the edge of going out of business and grasp the service as their last chance to stay in the black...

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Managing and Implementing Remote Patient Device Data in the EHR

Kapila Monga | Journal of AHIMA | May 17, 2017

These were the first words spoken over the telephone by inventor Alexander Graham Bell on March 10, 1876. According to popular legend, this call was also the first time the telephone was used to summon help, as Bell had just spilled acid.1 In a way, we can look back on this incident as prophetic, with the advent of telemedicine capabilities. Today, remote patient monitoring encompasses various audio, video, and augmented reality-related technologies and processes used for health information exchange between a patient and physician system. This is also sometimes called “connected health”...

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NHS Urged to Consider Microsoft Alternatives Following Cyber Attacks

Jon Hoeksma | Digital Health | May 17, 2017

In the wake of Friday’s international cyber attacks, which caused widespread disruption across NHS organisations, a small team of developers is recommending the health service reduce its reliance on Microsoft. The NHS almost exclusively uses Microsoft operating systems, some of which – like Windows XP – are no longer officially supported. To demonstrate that there is a licence-free alternative, GP Marcus Baw and technologist Rob Dyke have adapted the open source Linux-based Ubuntu operating system specifically for the NHS...

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Scenarios for Health Care Reform (Part 1 of 2)

Andy Oram | EMR and HIPAA | May 16, 2017

All reformers in health care know what the field needs to do; I laid out four years ago the consensus about patient-supplied data, widespread analytics, mHealth, and transparency. Our frustration comes in when trying to crack the current hide-bound system open and create change. Recent interventions by US Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act, whatever their effects on costs and insurance coverage, offer no promise to affect workflows or treatment. So this article suggests three potential scenarios where reform could succeed, along with a vision of what will happen if none of them take hold...

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HHS Emergency Update 2 - International Cyber Threat to Healthcare Organizations

Press Release | Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response | May 13, 2017

[The HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response] held our sector call today with over 1800 participants. The information below is responsive to several requests for information noted on the call. In addition, we would like to flag for the community that a partner noted an exploitative social engineering activity whereby an individual called a hospital claiming to be from Microsoft and offering support if given access to their servers. It is likely that malicious actors will try and take advantage of the current situation in similar ways. Additionally, we received anecdotal notices of medical device ransomware infection. Please note the directions below.

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Ken Banks Receives ACM Award for FrontlineSMS Work

Press Release | Association for Computing Machinery | May 10, 2017

Ken Banks, recipient of the Eugene L. Lawier Award for developing Frontline SMS, using mobile technology and text messaging to empower people to share information, organize aid, and reconnect communities during crises. A self-descrived "moble anthropologist," Banks has a gift for building technology that benefits humanity. As someone who was writing code and tinkering with computers since he was 13, Banks instinctively saw an opportunity to harness the world's most-used communications platform--mobile messaging--to help people in the developing world. In 2005, he designed, coded and launched FrontlineSMS, a mobile messaging platform that allows people to subscribe to groups, receive alerts, and establish communication hubs.

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Workplace Factors Contribute to Burnout in Family Physicians

Diana Phillips | Medscape | May 10, 2017

Family physicians who work in a hectic or chaotic environment, those who report high rates of job-related stress, and those who spend time at home working on electronic medical record (EMR) tasks may be particularly vulnerable to burnout, researchers report. In a study designed to assess workplace factors associated with burnout among family physicians, Monee Rassolian, MD, from Michigan State University, Flint, and colleagues administered an abbreviated burnout survey to a random sample of family physicians applying to take the 2016 American Board of Family Medicine Certification Examination. They report their findings online May 8 in JAMA Internal Medicine...

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AVIA Names Andy Slavitt as Senior Advisor

Press Release | AVIA | May 10, 2017

AVIA, the nation's leading network for health systems seeking to innovate and transform, announced that Andy Slavitt will join as a Senior Advisor. Slavitt brings to AVIA over two decades of private and public sector leadership in healthcare and technology. Slavitt previously served as the Acting Administrator for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under President Obama. There, he oversaw the Medicare and Medicaid programs and the implementation of the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance marketplace...

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Missing from MACRA: 2 Meaningful Use millstones

Press Release | American Medical Association | May 9, 2017

Physicians are now free from reporting on two major Meaningful Use requirements, but some doctors may not be aware of this long-sought change that became effective Jan 1. While it is hard to say how many physicians are in the dark about the change, there are anecdotal reports that some doctors don’t know that the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) final rule agreed with AMA’s call to drop computerized physician order entry (CPOE) and clinical decision support (CDS) from Medicare’s payment program. What’s safe to say for certain is that the move comes as relief to physicians, based on surveys measuring their attitudes on electronic health records (EHR) usability in patient care...

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Four Lessons In The Adoption Of Machine Learning In Health Care

Ernest Sohn, Joachim Roski, Steven Escaravage, and Kevin Maloy | Health Affairs | May 9, 2017

The March issue of Health Affairs demonstrates the potential of health care delivery system innovation to improve value for both patients and clinicians. Technology innovations such as machine learning and artificial intelligence systems are promising breakthroughs to improve diagnostic accuracy, tailor treatments, and even eventually replace work performed by clinicians, especially that of radiologists and pathologists. Machine-learning systems infer patterns, relationships, and rules directly from large volumes of data in ways that can far exceed human cognitive capacities...

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