security vulnerabilities

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18F Wants to Change the Rules, Not Break Them, Leader Says

Frank Konkel | Nextgov | February 22, 2017

The tech group 18F took some heat Tuesday when a General Administration Services inspector general audit found it skirting compliance rules and security procedures, but the department’s leader says the Obama-era tech unit is still committed to hacking bureaucracy. “Our job is transforming technology in government, and our job is to push against policies and regulations that are in the way of government being effective and delivering good services,” Technology Transformation Service Commissioner Rob Cook told Nextgov Wednesday...

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Protecode Announces Joint Open Source Software Competition with NHS

Press Release | Protecode | August 5, 2015

Protecode, an innovative provider of open source license management systems, today announced a collaboration with the British National Health Service (NHS) and Source Code Control Limited to launch the Code4Health competition, aimed at identifying quality software projects within the NHS's Code4Health Custodian model. The competition on managing compliance and vulnerabilities in open source software (OSS) is intended to highlight governance and security weaknesses that should be avoided by Code4Health collaborators as they develop and contribute their software to the community.

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The Medical Record of the Future: Part II

The current path of progress of the EHR, with its concentration on “meaningful use,” and an intellectual property regime that does not fully exploit the capacity for innovation by end-users is approaching an evolutionary dead-end. It is time to treat the EHR as what it should be: an integral part of medical care that has limitless potential for maximizing the use of information acquired in the provision of health care, and not an impediment to optimal care and a bugaboo for the physician. Read More »

Why Implanted Medical Devices Should Have Open Source Code

As medical implants become more common, sophisticated and versatile, understanding the code that runs them is vital. A pacemaker or insulin-releasing implant can be lifesaving, but they are also vulnerable not just to malicious attacks, but also to faulty code. For commercial reasons, companies have been reluctant to open up their code to researchers. But with lives at stake, we need to be allowed to take a peek under the hood. Over the past few years several researchers have revealed lethal vulnerabilities in the code that runs some medical implants. 

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