predictive analytics

See the following -

Amida Technology Solutions Announces “DRE 2.0”

Press Release | Amida Technology Solutions | December 1, 2015

Amida Technology Solutions, a Washington, DC-based open source software development company, announced today the seventh release of its Data Reconciliation Engine, “DRE 2.0.” The DRE is an open source platform that collects personal health data from a variety of sources, irrespective of format, and transforms it into an easy-to-use model. The DRE enables business intelligence, predictive analytics, decision support, and care coordination for patients, providers, and insurers...This update puts Amida at the vanguard of the latest standards-based, patient-centered health data interoperability.

Read More »

Big Data Reaches The Hill: A Guide To Making It More Actionable

Brand Niemann | AOL Government | October 10, 2012

Big data, which has been the hot topic for conferences this year, has also received a good deal of attention on Capitol Hill in recent weeks, most notably with two recent events... Read More »

Christine Doig on Data Science as a Team Discipline

Srini Penchikala | Info Q | August 26, 2016

Data science is about the design and development of solutions to extract insights from data (structured and unstructured) using machine learning and predictive analytics techniques and tools. Data Science as a discipline and Data Scientist as a role have been getting lots of attention in the recent years to solve real world problems with solutions ranging from fraud detection to recommendation engines. Christine Doig, Senior Data Scientist at Continuum Analytics, spoke at this year’s OSCON Conference about data science as a team discipline and how to navigate the data science Python ecosystem.

Read More »

Health Catalyst Launches Open Source Machine Learning: healthcare.ai

Press Release | healthcare.ai, Health Catalyst | December 1, 2016

Use of machine learning and predictive analytics to improve health outcomes has so far been limited to highly-trained data scientists, mostly in the nation's top academic medical centers. No longer. healthcare.ai is on a mission to make machine learning accessible to the thousands of healthcare professionals who possess little or no data science skills but who share an interest in using the technology to improve patient care. By making its central repository of proven machine learning algorithms available for free, healthcare.ai enables a large, diverse group of technical healthcare professionals to quickly use machine learning tools to build accurate models...

Read More »

How Analytics Are Changing Health Care

Reid Davenport | FCW | April 25, 2014

There is more to federal health IT than HealthCare.gov. And as agencies grapple with public health research and the care of their patient populations, innovators outside government are showing what's possible with improved electronic health records (EHRs) and predictive analytics.

Read More »

How VA Is Using Big Data To Keep Patients Out Of The Hospital

Lara Shane | Government Executive | December 23, 2013

The Partnership for Public Service and IBM Center for The Business of Government recently issued “From Data to Decisions III: Lessons from Early Analytics Programs,” which examines successful early government users of data to see how they got started, what sustained them and how the data was used to improve mission-critical programs. Read More »

IBM's Smarter Approach To Contextual Cities

Shel Israel | Forbes | June 3, 2013

I am writing a book called Age of Context with Robert Scoble. It is expected to be complete in October. Following is an excerpt from a chapter called Contextual Cities and the New Urbanists. Read More »

Machine Learning in Healthcare: Part I: Learn the Basics

This article is the first in a three-part series that will discuss how machine learning impacts healthcare. The first article will be an overview defining machine learning and explaining how it fits into the larger fields of data science and artificial intelligence. The second article will discuss machine learning tools available to the average healthcare worker. The third article will use a common open source machine learning software application to analyze a healthcare spreadsheet. Part I was written to help healthcare workers understand the fundamentals of machine learning and to make them aware that there are simple and affordable programs available that do not require programming skills or mathematics background...

Read More »

Machine Learning: Part II - Tools Available to the Average Healthcare Worker

A variety of machine learning tools are now available that can be part of the armamentarium of many industries, to include healthcare. Users can choose from commercial expensive applications such as Microsoft Azure Machine Learning Studio, SAS Artificial Intelligence Solutions or IBM SPSS Modeler. Academic medical centers and universities commonly have licenses for commercial statistical/machine learning packages so this may be their best choice. The purpose of this article is to discuss several free open source programs that should be of interest to anyone trying to learn more about machine learning, without the need to know a programming language or higher math.

Read More »

Microsoft and Partners Combine the Cloud, AI, Research and Industry Expertise to Focus on Transforming Health Care

Peter Lee | Microsoft Blog | February 16, 2017

...Healthcare NExT, a new initiative to dramatically transform health care, will deeply integrate greenfield research and health technology product development, as well as establish a new model at Microsoft for strategic health industry partnerships. Through these collaborations between health care partners and Microsoft’s AI and Research organization, our goal is to enable a new wave of innovation and impact using Microsoft’s deep AI expertise and global-scale cloud.This initiative includes investments in resources for our partners to capture new opportunities to apply AI to healthcare, such as the Microsoft AI in Health Partner Alliance, an expanding group of partners focused on advancing health technology. Alliance members will receive unique training and access to Microsoft technologies, engineering expertise and data sets. Read More »

Open Source EHR Generator Delivers Healthcare Big Data with FHIR

Jennifer Bresnick | Health IT Analytics | September 8, 2017

Healthcare data analysts frustrated by the lack of access to large volumes of clean, trusted, and complete patient data can now take advantage of an open source EHR data generator platform called Synthea. One million synthetic patient records are currently available within the free online system, which uses HL7 FHIR to allow access to standardized datasets that mimic real electronic health records...

Read More »

Open Source is Helping to Drive the Artificial Intelligence Renaissance

Sam Dean | Ostatic Blog | January 4, 2017

We're only a few days into 2017, and it's already clear that one of the biggest tech categories of this year will be artificial intelligence. The good news is that open source AI tools are proliferating and making it easy for organizations to leverage them. AI is also driving acquisitions. As Computerworld is reporting, in the past year, at least 20 artificial intelligence companies have been acquired, according to CB Insights, a market analysis firm. MIT Technology Review is out with its five big predictions for AI this year. Here is a bit on what they expect, and some of the open source AI tools that you should know about...

Read More »

Open Source Libraries for Health Analytics

Andy Oram | EMR & HIPAA | December 19, 2016

According to Health Catalyst’s Director of Data Science Levi Thatcher, the main author of the project, these tools are tried and tested. Many of them are based on popular free software libraries in the general machine learning space: he mentions in particular the Python Scikit-learn library and the R language’s caret and and data.table libraries. The contribution of Health Catalyst is to build on these general tools to produce libraries tailored for the needs of health care facilities, with their unique populations, workflows, and billing needs. The company has used the libraries to deploy models related to operational, financial, and clinical questions. Eventually, Thatcher says, most of Health Catalyst’s applications will use predictive analytics based on healthcare.ai, and now other programmers can too...

Read More »

Predictive Analytics – Healthcare’s Crystal Ball

Priyal Patel | Perficient Blog | September 9, 2013

...Imagine if you could effectively predict who was going to be hospitalized and reallocate resources to prevent unnecessary hospitalization and put those resources to use for cure rather than care. Read More »

Q&A with Andy Oram: How Can We Tell Whether Predictive Analytics Are Biased?

Andy Oram | Zoom Data | May 24, 2017

The fear of reproducing society's prejudices through computer algorithms is being hotly discussed in both academic publications and the popular press. Just a few of the publications warning about bias in predictive analytics include the New York Times, the Guardian, the Harvard Business Review, and particularly a famous and hotly contested article by Propublica on predictions of recidivism among criminal defendants...

Read More »