openness

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5 Things I Learned at TEDGlobal

Kirsten Cluthe | PCMag.com | July 5, 2012

The theme at TEDGlobal this year was "Radical Openness," indicating the effects of open-source technology, collaboration, social media, and DIY invention on our world. Read More »

An information goldmine: The World Bank Group Archives goes online

Elisa Liberatory Prati | Voices-Perspectives on Development | August 18, 2015

In April 2015, as part of its commitment to transparency and openness, the World Bank Group launched its Archives Holdings website. This is a state-of-the-art platform, which maximizes the public’s online access to a vast amount of original primary source material in the custody of the Archives. Created using the Access to Memory open source software, the website facilitates a faster, more efficient, and personalized online service delivery model. The software serves as a catalog that provides basic information about the resources of the Archives, and it is equipped with user-friendly finding aids compliant with the International Standard for Archival Description.

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Arduino Open Source Platform Fuels IoT and Farming’s Future

Press Release | Arduino | September 6, 2016

Arduino, the world’s leading open-source software and hardware ecosystem, is being used to power Farmbot, the revolutionary farming robot that is built fully on open source. Farmbot is a computer numerical control (CNC) farming machine and software package for small scale, hyper local, DIY food production. It is controlled by and Arduino RAMPS stack and connected to the Internet using Raspberry Pi 2. The platform is designed to be simple, scalable, hackable, and easily made...

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Dr. Don Berwick: Medical Error Is The Third Leading Cause Of Death In The US

Tori Bedford | WGBH News | May 5, 2016

The two most common causes of death in the United States are medical: heart disease and cancer, respectively. According to a new study, the third cause could also be medical—in a terrifying way. According to research published in the British Medical Journal, medical errors in hospitals and other medical facilities could be the third leading cause of death in the U.S., claiming 250,000 lives every year. One of the study’s authors wrote, “it boils down to people dying from the care that they receive, rather than the disease for which they are seeking care”...

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Duke Clinical Research Institute and SAS Open Heart-Disease Data to Researchers

Press Release | Supporting Open Access for Researchers (SOAR), Duke Clinical Research Institute, SAS | May 4, 2016

A new collaboration will give more researchers access to the largest and oldest cardiovascular database in the world. The Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) and analytics leader SAS will provide researchers worldwide with data management and analytics tools to explore 45 years of cardiovascular patient data collected by the Duke University Health System. The DCRI and SAS share the goal of greater transparency and openness in research to improve patient care to find new ways to treat heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States...

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eClinicalWorks Announces the Support of Patient Access to Physician Notes Through OpenNotes

Press Release | eClinicalWorks | October 10, 2017

eClinicalWorks®, a leader in healthcare IT solutions, today announced that it now supports OpenNotes, an international movement dedicated to making healthcare more open and transparent. The news supports enabling clinicians to easily share visit notes with patients using the eClinicalWorks Patient Portal. More than 130,000 providers using eClinicalWorks will now have the ability to share notes with their patients, with the goal of building stronger patient-provider relationships and empowering them to take control and be more confident in their healthcare decisions...

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Elsevier Acquisition Highlights the Need for Community-based Scholarly Communication Infrastructure

Heather Joseph and Kathleen Shearer | SPARC | September 6, 2017

Like many others in the scholarly community, we were very disappointed to learn about the recent acquisition by Elsevier of bepress, the provider of the popular Digital Commons repository platform. The acquisition is especially troubling for the hundreds of institutions that use Digital Commons to support their open access repositories. These institutions now find their repository services owned and managed by Elsevier, a company well known for its obstruction of open access and repositories...

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European Commission Considering Leap into Open-Access Publishing

Martin Enserink | Science | March 29, 2017

One of Europe’s biggest science spenders could soon branch out into publishing. The European Commission, which spends more than €10 billion annually on research, may follow two other big league funders, the Wellcome Trust and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and set up a “publishing platform” for the scientists it funds, in an attempt to accelerate the transition to open-access publishing in Europe...

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Five Ways Consortia Can Catalyse Open Science

Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, Karen S. Baker, Nicholas Berente, Courtney Flint, Gabriel Gershenfeld, Brandon Grant, Michael Haberman, John Leslie King, Christine Kirkpatrick, Barbara Lawrence, Spenser Lewis, W. Christopher Lenhardt, Matthew Mayernik, Charles McElroy, Barbara Mittleman, Namchul Shin, Shelley Stall, Susan Winter& Ilya Zaslavsky | Nature | March 29, 2017

“I am going to my grave with my disk drive in my cold dead hands.” So a senior scientist told a junior researcher, who related the tale at a 2013 US National Science Foundation (NSF) workshop on the reuse of physical samples in the geosciences. Sharing — of data sets, metadata, models, software and other resources — promises to speed discoveries, improve reproducibility and expand economic development. But it requires people to change. Overcoming personal reluctance is doubly difficult because many aspects of the scientific enterprise undermine sharing. Right now, most departments, funders and journals presume that data are proprietary from collection to publication..

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Good Things Can Come from Open Source Projects that Fail

Without realizing it, I joined the open source movement in 1999 during the midst of the Kosovo refugee crisis. I was part of a team helping route aid supplies to local humanitarian organizations running transit camps across Albania. These are the camps that refugees often arrived at first before being moved to larger, more formal camps. We found that refugees in the transit camps were not being registered or provided with any way of alerting family members of their whereabouts...

Help Us Integrate GitLab and the Open Science Framework

For years, the benefits of open source code development have been self-evident to the software development community: Transparency leads to collaboration, and collaboration leads to better and more secure code. The scientific community is just starting to understand these benefits. The growing open science movement is using these same lessons to make the scientific process more transparent, so that research findings will be more reproducible. In order to realize the benefits of open science, we must use a wide set of research tools to enable transparency, which will lead to increased discoverability, reuse, and collaboration...

HIT Think Why Interoperability Will Get Worse Before It Gets Better

Steve Meurer | Health Data Management | May 16, 2017

We hear the same thing from the health IT community every year: We’re committed to enabling seamless health data sharing. It’s the industry’s perennial commitment that electronic health records (EHRs) will soon share patient data across different platforms to ensure coordinated, high-quality care. Walls will come down in the name of better patient outcomes. Unfortunately, none of this is going to happen any time soon. In fact, I predict our industry’s struggle with interoperability will get worse before it gets better...

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How Scientists Are Using Digital Badges

The open source world pioneered the use of digital badges to reward skills, achievements, and to signal transparency and openness. Scientific journals should apply open source methods, and use digital badges to encourage transparency and openness in scientific publications. Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts know all about merit badges. Scouts earn merit badges by mastering new skills. Mozilla Open Badges is a pioneer in awarding digital merit badges for skills and achievements. One example of a badge-issuing project is Buzzmath, where Open Badges are issued to recognize progress in mathematics to students, or anyone wanting to brush up on their skills...

How the University of Hawai'i Is Solving Today's Higher Ed Problems

Openness invites greater participation and it takes advantage of the shared energy of collaborators. The strength of openly created educational resources comes paradoxically from the vulnerability of the shared experience of that creation process. One of the leaders in Open Educational Resources (OER) is Billy Meinke, educational technologist at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. The University's open creation model uses Pressbooks, which Billy tells me more about in this interview...

How to Care for the Community Over the Code

At All Things Open 2016, Joe Brockmeier answers the question: How can companies can work effectively with open source communities? In his talk, Joe reminded us of the #1 open source myth: Open source is comprised of mostly volunteers. The truth is, these days, pretty much any major open source project has people who are paid to work on it. There are always people who do it because they love it, but these days most of us are paid (and still love it). Over the years we have learned that if you want patches in a timely manner, you need people who are paid to do it...