open science

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Mozilla's Science Lab Is a Hub for the Open Research Community

Since the launch last June of Mozilla Science Lab, we’ve been working to unpack what science on the web and like the web means, and what Mozilla can do to support it. The Science Lab was created to serve as a neutral broker and hub for the open science community—a means of bridging the gap between the early adopters and the many scientists who understand the value of open science, but who have not yet (for a number of reasons) mapped that understanding onto their day-to-day workflow...

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OMICS Publishing Group And International Society For Ceramics In Medicine are Making Research On Bioceramics Open Access

Press Release | OMICS Group Incorporation, Ashdin Publishing | July 10, 2013

Strengthened by its Open Access initiatives, OMICS Group is pleased to publish the Bioceramics Development & Applications from 2013 onwards, the flagship journal of International Society for Ceramics in Medicine. Read More »

Open Access Meeting Reflections—SPARC 2012

Abby Clobridge | Information Today, Inc | March 26, 2012

Ten years after the movement was launched through the Budapest Open Access Initiative, open access (OA) is thriving, flourishing, and becoming a core element in the broader “Open Knowledge” movement that includes Open Educational Resources (OER), Free and Open Source Software (FOSS), Open Data, and Open Science among others, all of which share the common goals of providing free, unrestricted access to different types of information and knowledge. Read More »

Open Access Week 2014

Fabiana Kubke | Building Blogs of Science | October 25, 2013

What do brain machine interfaces and Open Science have in common? They are two examples of concepts that I never thought I would get to see materialised in my lifetime. I was wrong. Read More »

Open Chemistry Project Raises Up the Next Generation of Researchers

In 2007 I took part in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) developing the Avogadro application. As we were developing Avogadro, we founded The Open Chemistry project as an umbrella project to develop related tools for chemistry and materials science. Our goal is to bring high quality open source tools to research communities working in these areas, and to develop other tools to complement the Avogadro molecular editor. This year we were very pleased to be selected as a mentoring organization for GSoC; a few of our mentors are Geoff Hutchison, Adam Tenderholt, David Koes, and Karol Langner, who are all long-time contributors in related projects. And, we were lucky to get three slots for student projects...

Open Data And Open Science

Carlos Morais Pires | ICT Update | June 1, 2013

The G8 International Conference on Open Data in April 2013 aimed to make agricultural research more widely available to improve global food security. Carlos Morais Pires from the European Commission discusses the EC’s effort to increase access to data and reviews the G8’s plans. Read More »

Open Digital Science Journal Gains Users

The medical image community embraced open source as a standard practice back in 2000, with the adoption of the Insight Toolkit (ITK). ITK is sponsored by the US National Library of Medicine and was built as a C++ library. It is the equivalent to a usable encyclopedia of image processing algorithms... Read More »

Open Science Leaps Forward In 2014

Marcus D. Hanwell | Opensource.com | December 23, 2014

We have had quite a year of open science at Opensource.com in 2014! I couldn't hope to cover every article we published over the year, but I will highlight some of my favorites...

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Open Science Prize Announces Epidemic Tracking Tool as Grand Prize Winner

Press Release | Open Science Prize, Wellcome, Howard Hughes Medical Institute , National Institutes of Health | February 28, 2017

A prototype online platform that uses real-time visualization and viral genome data to track the spread of global pathogens such as Zika and Ebola is the grand prize winner of the Open Science Prize. The international team competition is an initiative by the National Institutes of Health, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). The winning team, Real-time Evolutionary Tracking for Pathogen Surveillance and Epidemiological Investigation, created its nextstrain.org prototype to pool data from researchers across the globe, perform rapid phylogenetic analysis, and post the results on the platform’s website...

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Open Science Prize Goes to Software Tool for Tracking Viral Outbreaks

Press Release | Fred Hutch | February 28, 2017

“Everyone is doing sequencing, but most people aren’t able to analyze their sequences as well or as quickly as they might want to,” Bedford said. “We’re trying to fill in this gap so that the World Health Organization or the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — or whoever — can have better analysis tools to do what they do. We’re hoping that will get our software in the hands of a lot of people”...

Open Source Health announces launch of the first Women’s Precision Medicine Platform in Atlanta, USA

Press Release | Open Source Health Inc. | June 9, 2016

Open Source Health Inc....a cloud based precision medicine platform that puts control into the hands of women to educate, advocate and collaborate on their own healthcare is pleased to announce the launch of the myAva Precision Medicine Platform with it’s first cohort of women in Atlanta, GA. “After 2 years of development we are finally set to deliver precision medicine to women with PCOS” says Sonya Satveit, CEO of Open Source Health Inc. “By providing an in-depth molecular insight of each woman, myAva will help achieve a new understanding of PCOS and has the potential to provide precision treatment programs customized to each woman’s unique molecular makeup.”

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Open Source Malaria Project Head Wins Accelerating Science Award

Belinda Smith | The Conversation | October 22, 2013

Dr Matthew Todd – leader of the Open Source Malaria consortium in Sydney, senior lecturer at the University of Sydney and Conversation author – was awarded one of three Accelerating Science Awards in Washington DC yesterday. Read More »

Open Source Tech Revolutionizes Water Pollution Testing Equipment

Press Release | Michigan Technological University | August 5, 2015

High nitrate levels in water cause the dead zones in the world’s largest deltas. Using too much nitrogen fertilizer wastes resources and leads to nitrate in runoff and water wells and an excess of nitrate in drinking water is a health hazard to infants and harmful to many animals. Current portable nitrate testers range in price and accuracy, from ballpark data at low price points to several hundred dollars for a handheld photometer. This new design is palm-sized, interfaces with a free Android app, costs less than $65 to manufacture and uses green chemistry for a safer and more accurate testing procedure. “This is a Popeye-approved reagent methodology,” Pearce jokes, adding that the enzyme used in the test kit is found in spinach and other leafy greens. “We’re replacing a toxic heavy metal with something that you eat every day in your salad.”

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Open Targets: New Name, New Data

Press Release | Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, European Bioinformatics Institute | April 19, 2016

Following the successful launch of its Target Validation platform at the end of 2015, the Centre for Therapeutic Target Validation has released its first open experimental datasets. Now renamed Open Targets, the pioneering public–private initiative remains committed to speeding up the discovery of new medicines. Open Targets projects use genome-scale experiments and analysis to provide evidence on the biological validity of therapeutic targets – and to glean insights into the likely effectiveness of pharmacological intervention on these targets...

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Open-Source Science Helps Father's Genetic Quest

Lisa M. Krieger | MedicalXpress | October 26, 2012

One tiny flaw in one gene in one little girl. That explains why Beatrice Rienhoff, 8, is so lean and leggy. But it took the communal contributions of many researchers - in an open-ended, open-source scientific search, led by her father - to solve Bea's singular mystery. Read More »