National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

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1 in 8 Chance of Catastrophic Solar Megastorm by 2020

Adam Mann | Wired | February 29, 2012

The Earth has a roughly 12 percent chance of experiencing an enormous megaflare erupting from the sun in the next decade. This event could potentially cause trillions of dollars’ worth of damage and take up to a decade to recover from. Read More »

Bryan Sivak: Chief Disrupter At HHS

Tom Sullivan | Healthcare IT News | July 30, 2013

The term disruption is perhaps a bit overused in the technology and healthcare sectors these days, but if there is one place where it’s needed most, that just might be the federal government. Read More »

Data Innovation, Crowdsourcing On The Horizon For Innovation Fellows Program

Shefali Kapadia | Federal News Radio | April 3, 2014

After the first two rounds of the Presidential Innovation Fellows (PIF) program showed marked success, the White House announced applications are open for Round 3 of the program.  "We are accepting applications right now through April 7," said Jennifer Pahlka, deputy chief technology officer in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and one of the executives that runs the PIF program.

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Food Fraud: Labels On What We Eat Often Mislead

Catherine Zuckerman | National Geographic | July 12, 2013

Despite trend in local, "authentic" foods, many aren't what they seem. Read More »

Geodata-Fueled Map Relates Storms To Energy Facilities

Reid Davenport | FCW | July 11, 2013

A new interactive map for tracking storms in real time, released on July 9 by the Energy Information Administration, aggregates some 30 sets of geodata from a wide range of agencies and organizations -- all in an effort to monitor the effect such storms could have on critical energy infrastructure. Read More »

Geospatial Intelligence: A Diagnostic Dashboard For A Healthier Nation

Chris Powell | Government Health IT | July 17, 2015

When it comes to public health, and identifying the events and behaviors that affect it, agencies charged with protecting the health and welfare of citizens need to leverage every available tool at their disposal to quickly and effectively respond to growing threats. Data mapping is a tool to answer the call...In the case of emergencies, planning and crisis response, open-source information is readily available via the CDC...

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Houston’s Flooding Shows What Happens When You Ignore Science and Let Developers Run Rampant

Ana Campoy and David Yanofsky | Quartz | August 29, 2017

Since Houston, Texas was founded nearly two centuries ago, Houstonians have been treating its wetlands as stinky, mosquito-infested blots in need of drainage.
Even after it became a widely accepted scientific fact that wetlands can soak up large amounts of flood water, the city continued to pave over them. The watershed of the White Oak Bayou river, which includes much of northwest Houston, is a case in point. From 1992 to 2010, this area lost more than 70% of its wetlands, according to research (pdf) by Texas A&M University...

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How Open Government Is Helping With Hurricane Relief in Puerto Rico

Just weeks after Hurricane Harvey hit Texas, two more "unprecedented" hurricanes made their way to the southeastern United States. Although changes in Hurricane Irma's path spared Florida from the bulk of the damage, both Irma and Maria directly hit Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Hurricane Maria was particularly devastating for the more than 3.5 million American citizens living in these U.S. Caribbean territories. The CEO of Puerto Rico's sole electric company indicated that the grid had been "basically destroyed." Without electricity, communications were severely limited. In the aftermath of a natural disaster, embracing open government principles—such as open data, collaboration between citizens and government, and transparency—can save lives.

Ohio City To Continue Water Ban After New Tests

John Seewer | ajc.com | August 4, 2014

New tests Sunday showed some toxins still contaminating Lake Erie, leaving regional water supplies off limits and some 400,000 residents in parts of Ohio and Michigan headed into a third day of scrambling to stock up on drinking, cooking and bathing water...

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Op-Ed: There’s A Leadership Void In Addressing Critical Geospatial Issues

Kevin Pomfret | Nextgov | November 11, 2013

Last month, nearly 1,000 global government and industry representatives from around the world attended a Mexico-hosted conference on the economic, societal and governmental benefits of geospatial technology. Notably absent were U.S. government officials. [...] Read More »

Open Source A Challenge With Geospatial Data

Frank Konkel | FCW | March 1, 2013

Open-source geospatial technology has proved its mettle in state and local government and the nonprofit and private sectors, providing significant services, value, innovation, transparency and a healthy return on investment. But significant barriers remain if federal agencies are to realize the same successes. Read More »

The New Seafloor Map That Could Help Find Flight MH370

Betsy Mason | Wired | May 27, 2014

...The lack of good information about ocean floor topography has complicated the search for Malaysian Airlines flight MH370.  Now, two ocean floor mapping experts have gathered all the available data to make a new map of a 2,000 km by 1,400 km (1,240 mile by 870 mile) area in the Indian Ocean near where two boats may have detected pings from the plane’s black box...

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U.S. Publishes New “Open Data Action Plan,” Announces New Data Releases

Alexander Howard | E Pluribus Unum | May 9, 2014

On the one year anniversary of President Barack Obama’s historic executive order to open up more government data, U.S. chief information officer Steven VanRoekel and U.S. chief technology officer Todd Park described “continued progress and plans for open government data” at the WhiteHouse.gov blog....

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White House Introduces New Class Of Innovation Fellows

Rebecca Carroll | Nextgov.com | September 15, 2014

The White House has pulled nearly 30 innovative techies from the private sector to spend a year tackling thorny government problems, introducing the third class of Presidential Innovation Fellows...

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Why This Year's Gulf Dead Zone Is Twice As Big As Last Year's

Tom Philpott | Mother Jones | August 14, 2013

[...] This year's "biological desert" (NOAA's phrase) is much bigger than last year's, below, which was relatively tiny because Midwestern droughts limited the amount of runoff that made it into the Gulf. At about 2,900 square miles, the 2012 edition measured up to be about a third as large as Delaware. Read More »