Javascript

See the following -

5 open source dashboard tools for visualizing data

To start with a confession, I like dashboards. A lot. I've always been fascinated by finding new and interesting ways to bring meaning to data with interactive visualization tools. While I'm definitely a geek for numbers, the human mind is simply much better at interpreting trends visually than it is just picking them out a spreadsheet. And even when your main interest in a dataset is the raw numbers themselves, a dashboard can help to bring meaning by highlighting which values matter most, and what the context of those numbers is...

A Case Of The Mumps

Rob Tweed | The EWD Files | October 21, 2012

I’ve been a developer since the late 1970′s and still going strong. [...] In all that time, just two languages have come my way where I’ve thought: “yes, this is cool; this is fun; this makes me really productive”.  One you’ll know: Javascript.  The other you’ll have either not heard of [....]: it’s known as the Mumps language. Read More »

A List of Open Source Tools for College

I've used Linux now for 3 1/2 years, which to me is a substantial period of time. In that time, I have gone from only using LibreOffice to expanding into a purely Linux and open source workflow. I have built my workflow around only using open source software if at all possible, although I am required to use a couple of proprietary tools sparingly. I'd like to share my own philosophy regarding open source. I was first introduced to Linux by my programming teacher; he is a passionate believer in FLOSS and he converted me. I have a passionate belief in the technical superiority of open source tools over proprietary ones because they allow me the freedom to use them however I wish...

An Introduction to Libral, a Systems Management Library for Linux

Linux, in keeping with Unix traditions, doesn't have a comprehensive systems management API. Instead, management is done through a variety of special-purpose tools and APIs, all with their own conventions and idiosyncrasies. That makes scripting even simple systems-management tasks difficult and brittle. For example, changing the login shell of the "app" user is done by running usermod -s /sbin/nologin app. This works great until it is attempted on a system that does not have an app user. To fix the ensuing failure, the enterprising script writer might now resort to...

Black Duck's Dave Gruber And Peter Vescuso: Open Source Is Maturing

Jack Germain | LinuxInsider | March 19, 2013

Mentioning open source to a typical consumer will no doubt result in puzzled looks or a reference to that "free stuff." Even in some business circles, the open source concept may only be synonymous with an alternative computer operating system known as Linux. Read More »

Can A Phoenix Arise From The Ashes Of Mumps? (Part 2)

Rob Tweed | The EWD Files | January 23, 2013

My analysis in part 1 of this article suggests that the rest of the IT industry have never recognised anything particularly special or noteworthy about these characteristics which I think is our (the Mumps community’s) fault, not their’s... Read More »

Chromecast: Understanding its Potential beyond Video Streaming

Google launched the $35 Chromecast into the US market in July 2013 and it became available in the UK in March 2014.  It’s primarily marketed as a device for streaming video to your TV, and, as such, is usually compared with the Roku streamer, Apple TV and the new Amazon Fire TV. Once you look under the covers, you discover that such comparisons are misleading: unlike the other devices, the Chromecast is actually much more than just a streaming device for TV.

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Department of Health APIs to Expand Web Content

Andy Oram | EMR & EHR | October 21, 2015

Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) appeal mostly to statisticians and researchers whose careers depend on access to data. But these programming tools are also a useful part of a Web that is becoming increasingly supple and sophisticated. I have written a series of articles about the use of APIs to share and run analytics on patient data, but today I’ll cover a cool use of an API developed by the Department of Health and Human Services for disseminating educational material. The locus for this activity started with the wealth of information created by the Centers for Disease Control for doctors, public health workers, and the general public. Striving to help the public understand vaccinations, West Nile fever, Ebola (when that was a major publicissue), and even everyday conditions such as diabetes, the CDC realized they had to make their content simple to embed in web sites for allthose audiences.

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DHS-Developed Krona Software Powers Humanitarian Project

Tammy Waitt | American Security Today | March 10, 2017

Software originally developed at the at the U. S. Department of Homeland Security’s National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center (NBACC) to sequence DNA for biodefense is now being used by Microsoft to sequence mosquito DNA in the fight against disease. Developed by the NBACC’s National Bioforensic Analysis Center Genomics Team for bioforensics applications, Krona is a unique visualization tool that enables users to quickly analyze massive quantities of data – such as more than 100 million sequences of DNA in a single mosquito sample, according to Microsoft...

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Disrupting Healthcare IT - The Easy Way to Develop a Beautiful and Usable EHR User Interface

Despite the best endeavors of the “mainstream” IT community, it’s an interesting fact that the top-end of the EHR marketplace is dominated by systems that use an otherwise little-known and poorly-understood database technology: Mumps.  Not only does this represent something of a closed book to the outside development community – they universally balk at the idea of having to use this technology’s native language, but also the companies that have developed and own these EHRs keep their technology tightly under their own control. Read More »

Eclipse Updates Four Key IoT Projects, Launches a New One

Darryl K. Taft | eWeek | June 16, 2016

The Eclipse Foundation announced new releases of four open-source IoT projects to accelerate IoT solution development. The Eclipse Foundation, which has been leading an effort to develop open-source technologies for Internet of things application development, announced that the Eclipse Internet of Things (IoT) Working Group has delivered new releases of four open-source IoT projects the group initiated over a year ago. The four projects, hosted at the Eclipse Foundation, are Eclipse Kura 2.0, Eclipse Paho 1.2, Eclipse SmartHome 0.8 and Eclipse OM2M 1.0. These projects are helping developers rapidly create new IoT solutions based on open source and open standards...

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EWD.js and VistA: Now With No Barriers to Entry

Over the past few weeks I’ve been busy.  Before explaining what I’ve been busy doing, I’ll start by stating my sincere thanks to Christopher Edwards (KRM Associates and Certification Manager at OSEHRA) for enhancing and extending his installer for VistA to include an option to automatically install, configure and fire up EWD.js. Read More »

Firefox OS Mobilises HTML5, Without The Added Steve Jobs

Scott Gilbertson | The Register | July 2, 2013

Review Do you want to build applications for Firefox OS? The first step is to head over to the Mozilla website and sign up for a developer kit. Read More »

Homeland Security Open Sources Software to Power Humanitarian Projects

Press Release | U.S. Department of Homeland Security | March 9, 2017

Software originally developed at the at the U. S. Department of Homeland Security’s National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center (NBACC) to sequence DNA for biodefense is now being used by Microsoft to sequence mosquito DNA in the fight against disease. Developed by the NBACC’s National Bioforensic Analysis Center Genomics Team for bioforensics applications, Krona is a unique visualization tool that enables users to quickly analyze massive quantities of data – such as more than 100 million sequences of DNA in a single mosquito sample, according to Microsoft...

Read More »

Hot Programming Trends from 2016

Technology is constantly moving forward—well, maybe not always forward, but always moving. Even for someone who keeps an eye on the trends and their effect on programmers, discerning exactly where things are headed can be a challenge. My clearest glimpse into open source programming trends always comes in the fall when I work with my fellow chairs, Kelsey Hightower and Scott Hanselman, and our fantastic programming committee to sculpt the coming year's OSCON (O'Reilly Open Source Convention). The proposals that we get and the number focused on specific topics turn out to be good indicators of hot trends in the open source world. What follows is an overview of the top programming trends we saw in 2016...