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Has Open Source Gone Mainstream?

Adam Shepherd | IT Pro | September 8, 2016

Open source has officially made it. While open source advocates may have faced an uphill battle to convince their colleagues in the past, the technology has now become a legitimate component of the mainstream technological scene. That's according to GitHub's senior director of infrastructure engineering Sam Lambert, who told IT Pro that open source software is no longer the niche field it once was...

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Healthcare.gov: Code Developed By The People And For The People, Released Back To The People

Alex Howard | The Atlantic | June 28, 2013

This new flagship federal .gov website is "open by design, open by default." That's a huge win for the American people. Read More »

Help Us Integrate GitLab and the Open Science Framework

For years, the benefits of open source code development have been self-evident to the software development community: Transparency leads to collaboration, and collaboration leads to better and more secure code. The scientific community is just starting to understand these benefits. The growing open science movement is using these same lessons to make the scientific process more transparent, so that research findings will be more reproducible. In order to realize the benefits of open science, we must use a wide set of research tools to enable transparency, which will lead to increased discoverability, reuse, and collaboration...

HHS Goes Open Source To Build Better, More Powerful Website

John Breeden II | GCN | May 1, 2013

When the Healthcare.gov website re-launches in June, users may not notice much of a change, but on the back end, there is a lot of open-source magic going on that will make content generation and the sharing of information more seamless than it is on perhaps any other government site operating today. Read More »

Hot Programming Trends from 2016

Technology is constantly moving forward—well, maybe not always forward, but always moving. Even for someone who keeps an eye on the trends and their effect on programmers, discerning exactly where things are headed can be a challenge. My clearest glimpse into open source programming trends always comes in the fall when I work with my fellow chairs, Kelsey Hightower and Scott Hanselman, and our fantastic programming committee to sculpt the coming year's OSCON (O'Reilly Open Source Convention). The proposals that we get and the number focused on specific topics turn out to be good indicators of hot trends in the open source world. What follows is an overview of the top programming trends we saw in 2016...

How Apache Kafka is Powering a Real-Time Data Revolution

Two years ago, Neha Narkhede co-founded a company called Confluent to build on her team's work with Apache Kafka. In this interview, we talk about how lots of companies are deploying Kafka and how that has led to a very busy GitHub repo. Narkhede will keynote at All Things Open in Raleigh, NC next week. Q: What was it like leaving LinkedIn to start your own company? Narkhede: It was a great experience and a natural extension of the mission that my co-founders and I had been working on for the past several years—of bringing Apache Kafka and our vision for a new future for a company's data architecture built around streaming data to the forefront...

How GitHub Helps You Hack The Government

Robert McMillan | Wired | January 9, 2013

On April 9th of last year, someone called Iceeey proposed a change to an obscure document written by the federal government’s Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The document wasn't that important. [...] But this small request was a very big deal. Read More »

How NASA Is Using WordPress To Promote Open Source Technologies

Sarah Gooding | WPMU | June 10, 2013

The National Aeronautic and Space Administration has been a leading global pioneer in science and technology since its inception in 1958, boldly going where no man has gone before. [...] But did you know that NASA is also an active participant in the open source community? Read More »

How New OSS Communities And Code Bases Are Developed From Old Ones

Jesse Hood | OpenLogic | July 24, 2013

Open source software developers modify significant amounts of source code for a variety of different reasons.  Depending on the amount of modification, the number of developers doing the fragmentation (sometimes called a “fork” in the code), the status of these developers in the community, and the intention of the development community, the results could be just a few lines of updated code, or it could be a complete fork of the code base that takes the open source project in an entirely new direction. Read More »

How Open Source Can Solve Silicon Valley's Engineering Crisis

Matt Asay | TechRepublic | July 15, 2014

Silicon Valley may think itself the center of the technology universe, but 76% of open-source development happens elsewhere, a rich talent pool for engineer-hungry startups...

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How Open Source Development Is Becoming More Social

Tim Yeaton | Mashable Tech | September 28, 2011

Most people do not think of software developers as being high on the “social” scale. In fact, the (misinformed) stereotype for a typical developer is that of the introverted geek. But in many ways, particularly with open source developers, this couldn’t be further from the truth. Read More »

How openFDA's 'Crazy Collision' of Silicon Valley and Federal Culture Is Reshaping the Regulator

Nick Paul Taylor | FierceBiotechIT | August 31, 2015

Over the past two years the reputation of the IT department at the FDA has changed rapidly. Once best known for burning through CIOs and receiving slapdowns from the congressional watchdog, the FDA is now garnering plaudits for its embrace of agile and open development. This new way of thinking is central to--and to an extent responsible for--the recently unveiled precisionFDA initiative. Bio-IT World dug into the genesis of precisionFDA and its implications in a feature this week.

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How Time-series Databases Help Make Sense of Sensors

Infrastructure environments' needs and demands change every year and systems become more complex and involved. But all this growth is meaningless if we don't understand the infrastructure and what's happening in our environment. This is where monitoring tools and software come in; they give operators and administrators the ability to see problems in their environments and fix them in real time. But what if we want to predict problems before they happen? Collecting metrics and data about our environment gives us a window into how our infrastructure is performing and lets us make predictions based on data. When we know and understand what's happening, we can prevent problems, rather than just fixing them...

How to Create an Internet-in-a-Box on a Raspberry Pi

If you're a homeschool parent or a teacher with a limited budget, Internet-in-a-Box might be just what you've been looking for. Its hardware requirements are very modest—a Raspberry Pi 3, a 64GB microSD card, and a power supply—but it provides access to a wealth of educational resources, even to students without internet access in the most remote areas of the world. I recently had a chance to visit with developers Adam Holt and Tim Moody about the project. Adam said this wonderful initiative began with One Laptop per Child at MIT. From there it was forked in 2012 into the School Server Community Edition project, and now it is called Internet-in-a-Box. I learned of the project while attending LinuxConNA last summer in Toronto, where I first met Adam... 

How To Do Software Like Nasa, By Nasa

Robert McMillan | Wired.com | April 4, 2014

Forty years after Apollo 11 landed on the moon, Nasa open sourced the software code that ran the guidance systems on the lunar module.  By that time, the code was little more than a novelty. But in recent years, the space agency has built all sorts of other software that is still on the cutting edge.

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