data analysis

See the following -

2013 Scientific Computing With Python Conference (SciPy 2013)

Pat Marion, Matt McCormick, Will Schroeder | Kitware Blog | July 19, 2013

The scientific computing in Python community has been rapidly blossoming over the years thanks to its ability to quickly analyze data in an interactive way, and for its ability to act a glue language that integrates code and data from a variety of environments. [...] Read More »

3 Steps To Improving Medical Data Error Reporting

Kristine Martin Anderson, Kathryn Schulke, Booz Allen Hamilton | Government Health IT | January 7, 2013

As is often the case in life, we hope to learn from our mistakes, and not repeat them. The same could be said for our healthcare system. Read More »

3D Slicer: An Overview

Rahul_Gupta | Linux For You | January 28, 2013

This article gives an overview of the open source medical imaging tool called 3D Slicer, which has been released under a BSD-style licence, and is a tool for visualisation and image analysis. Read More »

After West Disaster, News Study Finds U.S. Chemical Safety Data Wrong About 90 Percent

Jon McClure, Daniel Lathrop, and Matt Jacob | Dallas News | August 24, 2013

Even the best national data on chemical accidents is wrong nine times out of 10. A Dallas Morning News analysis of more than 750,000 federal records found pervasive inaccuracies and holes in data on chemical accidents, such as the one in West that killed 15 people and injured more than 300. Read More »

BioImageXD: A One-Stop Shop for All Image Post-Processing Needs

Latika Bhonsle | Lab Times | July 24, 2012

Most of us have sat for hours and hours in a dark and cold room, taking pictures of stained cells or tissue sections. But analysing and quantifying all those colourful images with customary software programmes can have its flaws. Therefore, Pasi Kankaanpää from the University of Turku, Finland and colleagues came up with a new “high-throughput image processing platform” and published it in Nature Methods. Read More »

Can Maryland's Other “CIO” Cultivate Innovation in Government?

Alex Howard | O'Reilly Radar | January 11, 2012

If innovation is driven by resource constraints, by "doing more with less," Sivak will be in the right place at the right time. Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley's 2012 budget included billions in proposed cuts, including hundreds of millions pared from state agencies. More difficult decisions will be in the 2013 budget as well. Read More »

Cancer And Clinical Trials: The Role Of Big Data In Personalizing The Health Experience

Despite considerable progress in prevention and treatment, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States. Even with the $50 billion pharmaceutical companies spend on research and development every year, any given cancer drug is ineffective in 75% of the patients receiving it. [...] Read More »

Commentary: Fitting Disease Management Pieces Together

Susan Philip | Government Health IT | July 8, 2013

Health reform is changing the landscape of a patient’s care and treatment, and with the increasing prevalence and rising costs of chronic and complex diseases in the United States, key stakeholders — including payers and providers — are now searching for better ways to manage these conditions. Read More »

Dadaab: Using Mobile Technology For Large Surveys In Emergency Settings

Anahi Ayala Iacucci | Internews | March 22, 2012

In August 2011, Internews led a joint communication and information needs assessment with Radio Ergo / International Media Support (IMS) and Star FM of Kenya, with significant support from the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC). This assessment aimed at understanding the information needs of refugees in Dadaab and exploring ways to improve the flow of communication between refugees, aid agencies and host communities. Read More »

Data Scientists Need Their Own GitHub. Here are Four of the Best Options

Jordan Novet | Venture Beat | March 1, 2016

Imagine if a company’s three highly valued data scientists can happily work together without duplicating each other’s efforts and can easily call up the ingredients and results of each other’s previous work.That day has come. As the data scientist arms race continues, data scientists might want to join forces. Crazy idea, right?...

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Developing Nations Improving Health Communication Through the Use of DHIS2

DHIS2 implementations are spreading steadily among national health services in developing countries as well as among international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) working to improving health in the developing world through the use of health information technology. As an open source solution, DHIS2 offers developing countries the advantage of adopting a cost-effective and flexible solution for aggregate statistical data collection, validation, analysis, management, and presentation as well as for data sharing between healthcare professionals and facilities. Organizations and individuals who work with humanitarian software solutions will need to know what DHIS2 is, how it works, and how it might be implemented by national health services and other health-related projects across the globe...

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Does Gum Disease Have a Link to Cancer, Dementia, Stroke?

Suzanne Allard Levingston | The Washington Post | October 1, 2016

Open wide. There’s a host of researchers peering inside your mouth, and you may be surprised at what they hope to find. They’re looking for a connection between gum disease and illnesses such as breast cancer and even dementia. What they’re seeing in there is intriguing: possible relationships between gum or periodontal disease and diabetes, heart disease, stroke and at-risk pregnancies. Some studies have been pursuing an association between bleeding gums and pancreatic cancer. Others are looking at whether there’s a connection between mouth bacteria and Alzheimer’s...

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Early adopters of EHR systems starting to reap major benefits

Fred O'Conner | ARN/IDG News | April 2, 2013

Electronic health record (EHR) adoption has been fastest at larger, more technology-savvy medical organizations, while smaller practitioners -- which make up the bulk of U.S. clinicians -- have been slow on the health-IT uptake for a variety of reasons, chief among them the cost, but also the training time and effort needed to make the move from paper. Read More »

Embarrassing New GAO Report On Hospital Safety Has Two Surprising Bright Spots

Leah Binder | Forbes | March 15, 2016

Hospitals are flummoxed by the problem of patient safety, according to a report issued by the Government Accounting Office (GAO) just in time for this week’s Patient Safety Awareness Week. Issued at the request of ranking members of the Senate Committee on Finance and Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), respectively, the report reveals three explanations on why hospitals find it so difficult to address patient safety. I am summarizing, but I am not exaggerating...

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Epic and Other EHR Vendors Caught in Dilemmas by APIs (Part 2 of 2)

Andy Oram | EMR and HIPAA | March 16, 2017

The first section of this article reported some news about Epic’s Orchard, a new attempt to provide an “app store” for health care. In this section we look over the role of APIs as seen by EHR vendors such as Epic. Dr. Travis Good, with whom I spoke for this article, pointed out that EHRs glom together two distinct functions: a canonical, trusted store for patient data and an interface that becomes a key part of the clinician workflow. They are being challenged in both these areas, for different reasons...

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