Augmented Reality (AR)

See the following -

Asking Better Questions and Improving Patient Engagement

I've been thinking about questions. A few things I read helped spur this. The first was a blog post entitled "Asking the Wrong Questions" by Benedict Evans, of VC firm Andreessen Horowitz, Mr. Evans looked at a couple of long range technology forecasts (from as long ago as 1964 and as recently as 1990), and pointed out how they both managed to miss several key developments. He attributed this to "this tendency to ask the wrong questions, or questions based on the wrong framework." And we're still at it. Mr. Evans, whose background is mobile technologies, said that people are now doing a lot of speculating about what comes "after mobile," such as AR and VR...

Beyond Glass: Inside Epson’s Scheme To Make The De-Facto Smart Glasses

Chris Davies | Slash Gear | February 8, 2014

Epson can forgive you if your first thought when you hear augmented reality is Google Glass, even though you're wrong. Google may never had actually described its wearable as an AR device, but a combination of the over-promising original concept video and a general naivety about the segment overall led many would-be Glass wearers to be surprised at what the headset really is: a convenient notifications pane in the corner of your vision.

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Could Pokémon Go Help Fix Healthcare and Lead to Usable EHRs?

However promising gamification in health care may be, it is the AR that may well hold the most promise for health care.  Google was not wrong to pursue Google Glass, just premature. Pokémon Go may be signaling that we're now finally ready for AR, and that it will be consumers as well as professionals who can benefit from it. The potential uses in health care are virtually endless, but here are a few examples...Ever feel like your doctor spends too much time staring at your chart or a screen? Instead of looking there for information about you, how much better would it be if he/she was looking at you, with AR notations for key information about you?...

IEEE Standards Association And W3C “Open Future Series” Champions More Collaborative, Interconnected Future During SXSW 2013

Press Release | IEEE, IEEE Standards Association | February 14, 2013

Global technology and open web standards development leaders unite to explore current and long-term implications of technologies like Augmented Reality, social robotics, and self-hacking... Read More »

Living in a Retro Health Care System

EHRs are a perfect example of how we took something that should revolutionize health care, and turned it into something that not only no one is happy with but that many feel often impedes care, to the point some want to go back to paper records.  That's not retro, that's just stupid.  We didn't do the wrong thing with EHRs, we just are doing it wrong. As I've written before, we should be thinking big and bold about how we want our health care system to work in the 21st century.  We should be setting tough goals for how effectively it works for us -- and expecting to achieve them.  We should be looking forward, not backward...

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Visual Search Goes Open Source

Press Release | Zappen | August 17, 2017

Visual Search is now open source. Zappen® and Yes Exactly, Inc.® today announced a FOSS production-ready framework for mobile application development utilizing computer vision, image recognition, and augmented reality (AR) technologies. Previously, working implementations of visual search have only been available through proprietary APIs such as that offered by Google Lens (still in beta)...

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Your Smartphone or Your Life...or, the Dangers of Addictive Technology

Rep. Jason Chaffetz's recent remarks suggesting that some Americans should invest in their health instead of in a new iPhone reminded me of nothing so much of the old Jack Benny bit, where Benny is accosted by a robber who threatens "your money or your life."  When Benny doesn't immediately respond, the robber prompts him, and the supposedly miserly Benny snaps back, "I'm thinking it over." I suspect that, like Mr. Benny, many of us would have a tough choice between our smartphones (and our other devices) and our health.  It may be not so that we're miserly as it is that we're addicted.