artificial intelligence

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A New Meaning for Connected Health at 2016 Symposium (Part 3)

Andy Oram | EMR & HIPPA | October 7, 2016

The previous section of this article paused during a discussion of the accuracy and uses of devices. At a panel on patient generated data, a speaker said that one factor holding back the use of patient data was the lack of sophistication in EHRs. They must be enhanced to preserve the provenance of data: whether it came from a device or from a manual record by the patient, and whether the device was consumer-grade or a well-tested medical device. Doctors invest different levels of trust in different methods of collecting data: devices can provide more objective information than other ways of asking patients for data. A participant in the panel also pointed out that devices are more reliable in the lab than under real-world conditions. Consumers must be educated about the proper use of devices, such as whether to sit down and how to hold their arms when taking their blood pressure...

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College Students Tackle PTSD at First DC Hackathon

More than 50 college students from across the world gathered this previous weekend at HackDC 2015, the first Hackathon dedicated to crowdsourcing innovative ways to address the serious problem of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) by creating mobile applications and solutions. The event, which started on Friday, went through Sunday afternoon. Held at the Richard J. Ernst Community Cultural Center in the Annandale Campus of the Northern Virginia Community Colleges (NVCC), HackDC 2015 provided the participants with access to food, sleeping facilities, and showers so that they could work straight through the weekend. 

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Does Google Glass Have a Place in the Operating Room?

Neil Versel | US News and World Report | June 3, 2014

Hospitals are finding innovative ways of adapting the head-mounted computer to healthcare environments. Read More »

Health Tap: Intelligent Interface for Patients

Andy Oram | EMR & HIPAA | January 9, 2017

    allows patients to connect with doctors online, and additionally hosts an enormous repository of doctors’ answers to health questions. In addition to its sheer size and its unique combination of services, HealthTap is ahead of most other health care institutions in its use of data. I talked with founder and CEO Ron Gutman about a new service, Dr. AI, that triages the patient and guides her toward a treatment plan: online resources for small problems, doctors for major problems, and even a recommendation to head off to the emergency room when that is warranted. The service builds on the patient/doctor interactions HealthTap has offered over its six years of operation, but is fully automated...

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Hot Programming Trends from 2016

Technology is constantly moving forward—well, maybe not always forward, but always moving. Even for someone who keeps an eye on the trends and their effect on programmers, discerning exactly where things are headed can be a challenge. My clearest glimpse into open source programming trends always comes in the fall when I work with my fellow chairs, Kelsey Hightower and Scott Hanselman, and our fantastic programming committee to sculpt the coming year's OSCON (O'Reilly Open Source Convention). The proposals that we get and the number focused on specific topics turn out to be good indicators of hot trends in the open source world. What follows is an overview of the top programming trends we saw in 2016...

How AI, Twitter And Digital Volunteers Are Transforming Humanitarian Disaster Response

Katie Collins | Wired | September 30, 2013

On 24 September a 7.7-magnitude earthquake struck south-west Pakistan, killing at least 300 people. The following day Patrick Meier at the [QCRI] received a call from the UN [OCHA] asking him to help deal with the digital fallout -- the thousands of tweets, photos and videos that were being posted on the web containing potentially valuable information about the disaster. Read More »

IBM's Watson Wants To Fix America's Doctor Shortage

Russell Brandom | The Verge | October 15, 2013

The supercomputer's greatest opponent may be the American healthcare system Read More »

OSEHRA 2015: Chairman of Open Source Health Speaks on the Future of Healthcare at Open Source Summit

Press Release | Open Source Health, OSEHRA | July 28, 2015

Open Source Health Inc...is pleased to announce it’s Executive Chairman, Gary Bartholomew, will present on the main stage at the 2015 OSEHRA Summit in Washington on July 29, 2015. “This is an important summit relating to open source technology in the healthcare industry which is on the verge of a revolution”, states Executive Chairman, Gary Bartholomew, Open Source Health Inc. “We are re-defining the next generation healthcare platform by incorporating big data and artificial intelligence to deliver personalized medicine at the molecular level”.

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The Collateral Benefits of India's Open Source Drug Discovery Programme

Priyanka Pulla | Forbes India | April 9, 2014

India's Open Source Drug Discovery programme is struggling for lack of expertise and a research ecosystem. However, the programme's real contribution may be the creation of just such an ecosystem Read More »

The State of Open Source in South Korea

Open source software is growing exponentially all around the world, and South Korea is a vital part of that trend. While most South Korean open source projects don't get the international attention that projects from the Apache Foundation, the Linux Foundation, and similar organizations receive, they are making significant contributions to mobility, artificial intelligence, web technologies, and other areas. Samsung may be the best-known South Korean company working in open source, but Naver, Kakao, Coupang, and others are also writing important open source software and maintaining their projects on GitHub.

To ER Is Human...To Build an App to Find the Right Caregiver Is...

I was prompted to think of ERs by a WSJ op-ed by Dr. Paul Auerbach.  In it, he argues that non-emergency visits to the ER aren't going to stop, much as we might wish patients to do a better job of evaluating when they are actually suffering an "emergency."  He notes the limited access to timely care from primary care physicians, and how it is not reasonable to expect people to make such rational evaluations when they or their loved ones are suffering. As he says, "You can't teach patients economics lessons when they don't feel well."

Udacity's Sebastian Thrun, Godfather Of Free Online Education, Changes Course

Max Chafkin | Fast Company | November 14, 2013

[...] It begins with a celebrated Stanford University academic who decides that he isn't doing enough to educate his students. The Professor is a star, regularly packing 200 students into lecture halls, and yet he begins to feel empty. What are 200 students in an age when billions of people around the world are connected to the Internet? Read More »