algorithms

See the following -

A New Meaning for Connected Health at 2016 Symposium (Part 3)

Andy Oram | EMR & HIPPA | October 7, 2016

The previous section of this article paused during a discussion of the accuracy and uses of devices. At a panel on patient generated data, a speaker said that one factor holding back the use of patient data was the lack of sophistication in EHRs. They must be enhanced to preserve the provenance of data: whether it came from a device or from a manual record by the patient, and whether the device was consumer-grade or a well-tested medical device. Doctors invest different levels of trust in different methods of collecting data: devices can provide more objective information than other ways of asking patients for data. A participant in the panel also pointed out that devices are more reliable in the lab than under real-world conditions. Consumers must be educated about the proper use of devices, such as whether to sit down and how to hold their arms when taking their blood pressure...

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South Carolina Awards BIS Contract: the First Multimillion-Dollar Opportunity of Many

On December 30th, the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) indicated its intent to award the SAS institute with a substantial contract to furnish a new Business Intelligence System (BIS). The contract, finalized on January 10th, represents a $45 million dollar, seven-year commitment on behalf of South Carolina. Other bidders on the contract included Truven Health Analytics, Deloitte, Optum, and Elder Research. James Samimi-Farr. This business intelligence platform constitutes part of South Carolina’s overall Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS) replacement project.

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To ER Is Human...To Build an App to Find the Right Caregiver Is...

I was prompted to think of ERs by a WSJ op-ed by Dr. Paul Auerbach.  In it, he argues that non-emergency visits to the ER aren't going to stop, much as we might wish patients to do a better job of evaluating when they are actually suffering an "emergency."  He notes the limited access to timely care from primary care physicians, and how it is not reasonable to expect people to make such rational evaluations when they or their loved ones are suffering. As he says, "You can't teach patients economics lessons when they don't feel well."