public health

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U.S. Hospitals Aren't 'Ebola-Ready'

Olga Khazan | The Atlantic | October 17, 2014

How did two nurses, both wearing protective gear, get Ebola in a Dallas hospital? That's the frightening question behind the growing criticism of the CDC and Dallas's Texas Health Presbyterian hospital...

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UC Davis Population Health Institute Publishes HIE Buyers' Guide

Anthony Brino | Government Health IT | November 5, 2012

Physcians, hospitals and other providers looking to link into a health information exchange or a regional health information organization now have a buyers' guide to the products on the market, from the University of California Davis Health System's Institute for Population Health Improvement. Read More »

Ultraviolet Light Robot Kills Ebola In Two Minutes; Why Doesn't Every Hospital Have One Of These?

Mike Adams | Natural News | October 11, 2014

While vaccine makers and drug companies are rushing to bring medical interventions to the market that might address the Ebola pandemic, there's already a technology available right now that can kill Ebola in just two minutes in hospitals, quarantine centers, commercial offices and even public schools...

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UMD Researchers Develop Tool to Counter Public Health IT Challenges

Press Release | University of Maryland | August 9, 2016

Front-line protection of U.S. communities against disease epidemics relies on seamless information sharing between public health officials and doctors, plus the wherewithal to act on that data. But health departments have faltered in this mission by lacking guidance to effectively strategize about appropriate “IT investments. And incidents like the current Zika crisis bring the issue to the forefront,” says Ritu Agarwal, Robert H. Smith Dean's Chair of Information Systems and Senior Associate Dean for Faculty and Research at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business...

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Upgrading the PULSE Emergency Response Tool to a Community Edition

Seven years ago the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) began work on the Patient Unified Lookup System for Emergencies (PULSE). PULSE is an effort to create national resilience by improving first responder access to patient electronic health information they need to provide services and ensure public health during disasters, including public health emergencies. Recently, ONC launched a new, code-only technical solution called PULSE-Community Edition (PULSE Community) that builds on the original PULSE code. PULSE Community enables first responders and other response personnel (e.g., epidemiologists, emergency medical services, and health care volunteers) to securely access vital health information they need during emergencies and disasters from connected health care organizations.

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US And UK Share Health Data Via Cloud

Anthony Brino | Healthcare IT News | November 15, 2013

About half a century after epidemiology studies in Massachusetts and the United Kingdom helped build the world’s understanding of cardiovascular disease and health risks, public health and population data is being opened up by the U.S. and joining international datasets. Read More »

US Senate Releases Draft Future Pandemic Preparedness Plan - Asks for Feedback

On June 10, 2020 the US Senate released a white paper titled "Preparing for the Next Pandemic" under the signature of Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee. The white paper has five recommendations to address future pandemics based on lessons learned from COVID-19 and the past 20 years of pandemic planning. "The five recommendations...along with a series of questions at the end of this white paper, are intended to elicit recommendations that Congress can consider and act on this year," Senator Alexander said in a statement, adding that "I am inviting comments, responses, and any additional recommendations for the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions to consider. This feedback will be shared with my colleagues, both Democrat and Republican." This feedback from the public will be accepted until June 26, 2020... Read More »

US Will Screen Air Passengers For Signs Of Ebola. Will It Work?

Maryn McKenna | WIRED | October 9, 2014

If you’ve been following the Ebola story, you may have noticed that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced a move yesterday to try to keep the disease off US soil. At the five US airports that receive most passengers from the three countries where Ebola is circulating, passengers will be singled out on the basis of their travel records; interviewed by means of a questionnaire; and have their temperature taken, to see if they have a fever...

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Using 'Open Source' Tools to Fight Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI)

There are 110 million sexually transmitted infections (STI) among women and men nationwide, with 20 million new STIs reported each year. CDC officials, estimate direct medical costs of STIs at a over $16 billion annually. Collaborative, 'open source' tools like 'Private Results' and 'So They Can Know' developed by Sexual Health Innovations offer help in fighting this public health battle in cities across the U.S. and around the world. Read More »

Using the Latest Advances in Data Science to Fight Infectious Diseases

One of the most dramatic shifts in recent years that is empowering epidemiologists to be more effective at their jobs is occurring due to improvements in data technologies. In the past, the old "relational" data model dictated that data had to be highly structured, and as a result treated in distinct silos. This made it difficult, if not impossible, to analyze data from multiple sources to find correlations. Epidemiologists would spend many minutes or even hours on each query they ran to get results back, which is unacceptable when you need to test dozens of hypotheses to try to understand and contain a fast-moving outbreak. (Imagine how you would feel if each one of your Google searches took 45 minutes to return!) By contrast, using newer technologies, the same queries on the same hardware can run in seconds. Read More »

Violent Behavior Linked To Nutritional Deficiencies

Press Release | Weston A. Price Foundation (WAPF) | August 30, 2013

Deficiencies of vitamins A, D, K, B1, B3, B6, B12 and folate, and of minerals iodine, potassium, iron, magnesium, zinc, chromium and manganese can all contribute to mental instability and violent behavior, according to a report published in the Spring 2013 issue of Wise Traditions, the journal of the Weston A. Price Foundation. Read More »

Viral Intelligence

Mark Sircus | DrSircus.com | October 8, 2014

The CDC thinks that American hospitals are prepared to handle Ebola. RNs beg to differ...

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Vision for a Principled Redesign of Health Information Technology

Steven E. Waldren, MD, Deborah J. Cohen, PhD, Jacob M. Reider, MD, Jewell P. Carr, MD and Ciarán A. DellaFera, MD | Annals of Family Medicine | May 15, 2017

The mission for Family Medicine for America’s Health (FMAHealth) is to help people live healthier. To support this, a goal of the FMAHealth Technology Tactic Team is to envision a future state that involves the principled redesign and implementation of health information technology (IT) that optimally supports the health and health care of the US populace. Compared to other nations, the US health care system offers higher cost, lower quality health care to its people...

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Wagner Foundation Donates $15 Million to Partners In Health for Hi Tech Healthcare Projects

Press Release | Wagner Foundation | August 1, 2018

The Wagner Foundation, a private Boston-based foundation, announced today that it is supporting international medical charity Partners In Health with a $15 million grant. The award represents the largest donation to any entity in the Wagner Foundation’s 13-year history, and will enable Partners In Health to launch a groundbreaking initiative to improve the health of impoverished people, especially women and children, in 10 countries around the world....By supporting data infrastructure and expertise, Partners In Health and the Wagner Foundation are also eager to show that long-term investments in public healthcare systems, not just disaster or emergency responses, produce the best outcomes for patients, families, and communities.

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We May Have Reached The 'Apocalyptic Scenario' With Antibiotics

Erin Brodwin | Business Insider | December 5, 2014

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Tom Frieden made headlines last year when he proclaimed that the United States would "soon be in a post-antibiotic era," meaning we'd be plagued by everyday infections that our drugs could no longer handle...

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