Electronic Health Record (EHR)

See the following -

What's Being Done to Oppose and Support ICD-10 Implementation

Carl Natale | Government Health IT | January 30, 2012

The American Medical Association has taken the next step in its vigorous opposition to ICD-10 implementation. This week, James L. Madara, MD, the AMA's executive vice president and CEO, wrote a letter asking Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives John Boehner to stop implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS.

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Where did the issue of health data exchange disappear to?

There has been extensive talk about the scandals at the VA and remedies for them, including the political and financial ramifications of partial privatization. Republicans have suggested it for some time, but for the solution to be picked up by socialist Independent Senator Bernie Sanders clinches the matter. What no one has pointed out yet, however–and what makes this development relevant to the Datapalooza–is that such a reform will make the free flow of patient information between providers more crucial than ever. Read More »

White House Names New Federal CTO

J. Nicholas Hoover | Information Week | March 9, 2012

...Park has been one of the foremost advocates of open government within the Obama administration. He has called for the creation of a healthcare data clearinghouse and speaks regularly on open government-related issues. Park has said that he sees open government as a way to make government work better. "The ultimate measure of success should be improvement in the fundamental efficiency and effectiveness of government," he said in a 2010 interview with InformationWeek...

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White Paper: Stop the Referral Problem - Building Digital Care Transitions that Reach Your Entire Network

The healthcare industry has crossed a digital chasm-at least in part. Patient records have moved from paper to computer and many transactions, such as e-prescribing and lab orders have been automated, to accelerate workflows, minimize mistakes and reduce costs. But when it comes to sharing patient records, especially beyond the four walls of a hospital, we remain in the dark ages of paper and fax...In this paper, we will discuss our research about how referrals and care transitions are typically conducted; the financial, non-financial, and quality impacts on patient care; and near-term opportunities for leveraging technology to accelerate these processes to benefit provider organizations and to deliver a high-quality, efficient patient experience.

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Who helps your Linux distribution run smoothly? Thank a packager today

The people behind the scenes who work tirelessly to make your Linux distribution run smoothly are the packagers. The vast majority of Linux packagers are volunteers who dedicate their evenings and weekends to create and maintain the gears of the Linux distributions they love. Read More »

Why DoD EHR Modernization Will Fail

Susan D. Hall | FierceHealthIT | April 10, 2015

As the U.S. Department of Defense zeroes in on determining which bidding group will be awarded the coveted contract to modernize its electronic health record system, Loren Thompson, COO at the nonprofit Lexington Institute, says the effort is doomed to fail. As evidence, he uses the words that Christopher A. Miller, the program executive overseeing the project, used in testimony before the Senate's defense appropriations subcommittee. Read More »

Why Electronic Health Records Aren't More Usable

Ken Terry | CIO | December 3, 2015

Federal government incentives worth about $30 billion have persuaded the majority of physicians and hospitals to adopt electronic health record (EHR) systems over the past few years. However, most physicians do not find EHRs easy to use. Physicians often have difficulty entering structured data in EHRs, especially during patient encounters. The records are hard to read because they're full of irrelevant boilerplates generated by the software and lack individualized information about the patient...

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Why Geeks Should Care About Meaningful Use and ACOs

Fred Trotter | O'Reilly Radar | October 21, 2011

Healthcare reform pairs two basic concepts: Change incentives: lower costs by paying less for "better" care not "more" care; Use software to measure whether you are getting "better" care. Read More »

Why I Hope to Help End EHR’s Lack of Interoperability

I am tired of waiting. Millions of medical professionals and patients are tired of waiting.  We have been waiting for EHR interoperability since the dawn of EHRs in the 1960s. Enough is enough! Our goal is to achieve EHR interoperability through a grass roots coalition of medical professionals and patients who are tired of waiting. The simple life-saving ability of hospital EHRs to connect to one another so healthcare providers can easily and readily access patient data is not being addressed.  This type of issue is traditionally solved by industry or government initiatives. But so far they have not, and apparently will not solve it so I have decided to raise this issue through an outpouring of angry citizens, hospital patients, physicians and others being impacted. Read More »

Why Some Docs Will 'Just Say No' To MU

Madelyn Kearns | Healthcare IT News | August 8, 2014

Thousands of eligible providers are working diligently toward EHR incentive payments, but some practices are choosing a different route: abandoning meaningful use altogether in favor of their own solutions, and finding ways to make up for the penalties they’ll incur down the road...

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Why The Private Sector Lags VA In Telehealth

Ken Terry | Information Week | August 5, 2013

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has long been ahead of the private sector in health IT. Its VistA electronic health record (EHR) system, for example, was in use throughout the VA's hospitals and ambulatory clinics long before non-VA providers began to adopt EHRs en masse in the past few years. And as recent VA figures show, the department has also left the private sector in the dust in the area of telehealth. Read More »

Wikipedia and Facebook for Clinical Documentation

Over the past several years I’ve written about the inadequate state of clinical documentation, which is largely unchanged since the days of Osler, (except for a bit more structure introduced by Larry Weed in the 1970s) and was created for billing/legal purposes not for care coordination...In recent lectures, I’ve called on the country to adopt Wikipedia and Facebook for clinical documentation...

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Will PHIEs Lead the Consumer Medical Record Revolution and Bridge the Gap Between Personal Health Records and EHRs?

It has only been about two generations since traveling medicine shows were common forums for medical information. Phony research and medical claims were used to back up the sale of all kinds of dubious medicines. Potential patients had no real method to determine what was true or false, let alone know what their real medical issues were. Healthcare has come a long way since those times, but similar to the lack of knowing the compositions of past medical concoctions and what ailed them, today’s digital age patients still don’t know what is in their medical records. They need transparency, not secret hospital –vendor contracts and data blocking, like the practices being questioned by the New York Times. One patient, Regina Holliday resorts to using art to bring awareness to the lack of patient’s access to their own medical records.

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Will The DoD Create Another Frankenstein EHR?

Donald Voltz | HIT Consultant | October 31, 2014

Will the DoD create another Frankenstein EHR monster? Don’t trick us with dead data, treat us with middleware connectivity, Dr. Donald Voltz writes...

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Will “Digital Fingerprint” Forensics Thwart the Data Thieves Lurking in Hospital EHR Corridors?

As Halloween approaches, the usual spate of horror movies will intrigue audiences across the US, replete with slashers named Jason or Freddie running amuck in the corridors of all too easily accessible hospitals. They grab a hospital gown and the zombies fit right in.  While this is just a movie you can turn off, the real horror of patient data theft can follow you...Unfortunately, this horror movie scenario is similar to how data thefts often occur at medical facilities. In 2015, the healthcare industry was one of the top three hardest hit industries with serious data breaches and major attacks, along with government and manufacturers. Packed with a wealth of exploitable information such as credit card data, email addresses, Social Security numbers, employment information and medical history records, much of which will remain valid for years, if not decades and fetch a high price on the black market.

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