University of California San Francisco (UCSF)

See the following -

Another Major HIT Project Setback at UCSF: Vendor, Client or Both at Fault?

Scott Silverstein | Health Care Renewal | October 13, 2009

In yet another example of a major health IT project setback, in August I wrote about UCSF's apparent problems with health IT implementation that I learned about through anonymous comments at the HisTALK blog. At "Lessons Unlearned: Health IT Failure, Act 2" I wrote:

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Baby Birth Costs Vary 10-Fold In Hospitals, Study Finds

Caroline Chen | Bloomberg Sustainability | January 16, 2014

The cost of giving birth at a hospital can vary by tens of thousands of dollars, a price range that is “largely random” and unexplainable by market factors, a California study found. Read More »

Board Certified Clinical Informaticists & 'Precision Medicine'

In January 2014, a select group of physicians are to receive the first national board certification in Clinical Informatics, including Seth Bokser, MD, medical director for information technology at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Benioff Children's Hospital.  Awarded by the American Board of Preventive Medicine, the certification recognizes the increasingly vital role that the science and practice of informatics plays in health care. Read More »

Doctors Use Social Media For Continuous Medical Education

David F. Carr | Information Week | September 18, 2013

By rebranding what they do on blogs and Twitter, advocates of Free Open Access Medical Education, or #FOAMed, seek to accelerate medical knowledge sharing.

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GETy Awards Celebrate Unorthodox Open-Source Approaches to Accelerating Human Health Advances

Press Release | GET Conference | April 13, 2016

An “open-source” approach to accelerating human health advances is the common theme among a diverse group of medical science projects that have won six science awards honoring “excellence in participant-centered research” - a rapidly emerging field that aims to turn patients and healthy people into more active and more data-sharing participants in medical research. The awards will be given out at Harvard Medical School in Boston on April 25 at a scientific convening called GET Conference (“GET” stands for “Genomes, Environments, Traits”). “The winners of the GETy Awards are at the forefront of a research revolution that will radically accelerate the rate of human health advances,” says Jason Bobe, organizer of the GET Conference, and Executive Director of the nonprofit PersonalGenomes.org.

Google, Facebook, Amazon: Algorithms Will Soon Rule Our Lives So We'd Better Understand How They Work

Jamie Bartlett | The Telegraph | March 28, 2014

One of the most interesting announcements in last week's Budget – well, for me at least, as someone who has no savings and doesn’t play bingo or drink much – was the new Alan Turing Institute: £220 million of government support will be invested into "big data and algorithm" research.

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GreenDot open source Diabetes platform presented at Dreamforce 2012

GreenDot was part of the UCSF 'Unusual Thinkers' track presented at Dreamforce 2012, this past week at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. GreenDot is  an evolving open source platform that makes diabetes data more accessible and via the web or mobile systems.  It collects data from different diabetes-related devices and stores it in a secure, open source platform. Read More »

How IBM’s STEM Uses Big Data To Help Fight Infectious Diseases

Dean Takahashi | MedCity News | September 30, 2013

IBM has teamed up with university researchers to use big data and analytics to predict the outbreak of deadly diseases such as Dengue fever and Malaria. Read More »

How Much Will I Be Charged?

Press Release | UCSF | February 26, 2013

It’s a basic, reasonable question: How much will this cost me? For patients in the emergency room, the answer all too often is a mystery. Read More »

Parker Foundation Invests $250 Million in Open and Collaborative Cancer Research to Accelerate Innovation

Press Release | The Parker Foundation | April 13, 2016

The Parker Foundation today announced a $250 million grant to launch the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, a collaboration between many of the country's best scientists, clinicians and industry partners to lead an unprecedented cancer immunotherapy research effort. The gift is the largest single contribution ever made to the field of immunotherapy. The Parker Institute's goal is to accelerate the development of breakthrough immune therapies capable of turning cancer into a curable disease by ensuring the coordination and collaboration of the field's top researchers and quickly translating their findings into patient treatments.

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Sugar Can harm Like Alcohol and Tobacco; Regulate It, Article Says

Karen Kaplan | Los Angeles Times | February 1, 2012

In a provocative commentary coming out in Thursday’s edition of the journal Nature, Dr. Robert Lustig and two colleagues from UC San Francisco argue that the added sugars in processed foods and drinks are responsible for so many cases of chronic disease and premature deaths that their use ought to be regulated, just like alcohol and tobacco.

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Syapse Joins Free The Data! Initiative and Provides Software To Power Participant-centric Hereditary Gene Mutation Data

Press Release | Genetic Alliance, Syapse | July 31, 2013

Syapse, the leader in software for bringing omics into routine medical use, announced that it has joined the Free the Data! initiative. [...] Read More »

We Can Work It Out: Collaboration Leads To Insights, New Targets In Epilepsy

Ron Leuty | Business Times | August 13, 2013

A little scientific cooperation goes a long way. Epilepsy researchers, who more than a decade ago forged a national collaboration, have discovered 25 new mutations around the neurological disorder. What’s more, they also uncovered two genes behind rare childhood forms of the disease... Read More »

Wearable Devices With Health IT Functions Poised To Disrupt Medicine

Fred O'Connor | PC World | May 1, 2014

The next innovation in health care may come from Silicon Valley. With Google, Apple and Samsung exploring how to incorporate health IT features into wearable devices, patients may soon provide information to doctors through devices such as smartwatches that can measure and transmit biometric data. 

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