terrorism

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3 NSA Veterans Speak Out On Whistle-Blower: We Told You So

Peter Eisler and Susan Page | USA Today | June 16, 2012

In a roundtable discussion, a trio of former National Security Agency whistle-blowers tell USA TODAY that Edward Snowden succeeded where they failed. Read More »

5 Humanitarian Crises Where Open Source Projects Aimed to Bring Stability Government Software

Noah DMello | Computer World | April 26, 2016

Natural disasters, epidemics, terrorism, and uprisings—the world awaits with bated breath for the situation to turn to normalcy for those directly and indirectly affected by these crises. Here are five crises where open source technologists have helped, in some way, to bring stability in these hostile regions. An annoyed user couldn’t fix his printer as the printer’s source code wasn’t available to users. This was the reason that led to the start of the open source movement...

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5 Things To Know About The NSA Court Ruling

James Oliphant | Nextgov | December 17, 2013

A District Court decision that the NSA's sweeping data collection program is unconstitutional paves the way for a Supreme Court review of the counterterrorism program, and creates a major headache for the Obama administration in the process. Read More »

Armed UK Police Raid House Over Facebook Picture Showing Toy Weapon In Background

Glyn Moody | Techdirt | February 20, 2013

One of the reasons Techdirt rails against exaggerated responses to supposed terrorist threats is that it has caused police forces around the world to lose all sense of proportion -- literally, in the case of this UK story from the Daily Mail. Read More »

Cantaloupe vs. al-Qaeda: What's More Dangerous?

Michael Meurer | Truthout | September 15, 2013

[An important revelation] is the exposure of a nearly lunatic disproportion in threat assessment and spending by the US government. This disproportion has been spawned by a fear-based politics of terror that mandates unlimited money and media attention for even the most tendentious terrorism threats, while lethal domestic risks such as contaminated food from our industrialized agribusiness system are all but ignored Read More »

CDC Official Protests Federal Medical Response Cuts

Diane Barnes | Nextgov.com | April 29, 2014

More than half a decade of reductions to spending on state and local public-health agencies has already been "extremely damaging" to capabilities across the country for responding to unconventional attacks and other disasters, Dr. Ali Khan, director of the Public Health Preparedness and Response Office at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told Global Security Newswire in an interview. 

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Cities Might Not Be As Prepared As They Think For A Bioterrorism Attack

John Metcalfe | The Atlantic Cities | July 24, 2013

Imagine that a small group of terrorists deliberately infect themselves with smallpox and then walk around London, spreading it to the populace. How much could the terrible disease proliferate before the world realized something was amiss? Read More »

DHS Announces $1.3 Billion in Preparedness Grants

David Stegon | FedScoop | July 2, 2012

The Department of Homeland Security announced more than $1.3 billion in allocations for seven preparedness grant programs to assist states, urban areas, tribal and territorial governments, non-profit agencies, and the private sector in strengthening the nation’s ability to prevent, protect, respond to and recover from terrorist attacks, major disasters and other emergencies. Read More »

Electromagnetic Pulse Caucus Battles Skeptics In Push To Protect The Planet

Billy House | Nextgov | March 11, 2013

Doomsday preppers or congressional visionaries? A small but growing cadre of House members is set to relaunch efforts to protect the nation against what they say is a very real threat: the unleashing of an electromagnetic pulse either by a solar storm or a nuclear-armed foe that could cripple much of the nation’s electrical infrastructure. Read More »

FBI Agent to CHIME Attendees: The Cybersecurity Environment Is Becoming More Dangerous

Mark Hagland | Healthcare Informatics | August 15, 2016

The level of cybersecurity threat is growing exponentially in healthcare right now, but there are some very clear strategies that the leaders of patient care organizations can and should do in order to fight back. That was the core of the message that Timothy J. Wallach, a supervisory special agent in the Cyber Task Force in the Seattle Field Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) told attendees Monday morning at the CHIME/AEHIS LEAD Forum Event, being held at the Seattle Marriott Waterfront in Seattle...

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How A Massive Nuclear Nonproliferation Effort Led To More Proliferation

Douglas Birch and R. Jeffrey Smith | The Atlantic | June 24, 2013

More than a decade of negotiations with Russia produced a clear winner, and it was not the United States. Read More »

How Accumulo Safeguards Your Civil Liberties

Jeffrey Kelly | Silicon Angle | June 7, 2013

It’s been widely reported that the NSA is in the midst of collecting huge volumes of call metadata from Verizon associated with all domestic and international calls made by the company’s customers for three months [...]. Less attention has been paid to what exactly the government does with all that data or the technology supporting it. Read More »

If PRISM Is Good Policy, Why Stop With Terrorism?

Derek Khanna | The Atlantic | July 4, 2013

Defenders of the program say its effectiveness excuses it -- but they ignore the Fourth Amendment. Read More »

In Depth Review: New NSA Documents Expose How Americans Can Be Spied On Without A Warrant

Kurt Opsahl and Trevor Timm | Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) | June 21, 2013

The Guardian published a new batch of secret leaked FISA court and NSA documents yesterday, which detail the particulars of how government has been accessing Americans’ emails without a warrant, in violation of the Constitution. [...] Read More »

In Secret, Court Vastly Broadens Powers Of N.S.A.

Eric Lichtblau | The New York Times | July 6, 2013

In more than a dozen classified rulings, the nation’s surveillance court has created a secret body of law giving the National Security Agency the power to amass vast collections of data on Americans while pursuing not only terrorism suspects, but also people possibly involved in nuclear proliferation, espionage and cyberattacks, officials say. Read More »