Open Access

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Patents: The Next Open Access Fight

There’s been a lot of talk lately about the state of publicly funded research. Many, including EFF, have long called on Congress to pass a law requiring that publicly funded research be made available to the public. With strong support for FASTR (the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act) in both parties, Vice-President Biden making open access a major component of his Cancer Moonshot initiative, and presumptive presidential nominee Hillary Clinton including access to research in her platform, signs are looking good that Congress will finally pass an open access mandate. It’s just a matter of when...

Patient Engagement, Data Liberation And Portability

Christine Årdal and John-Arne Røttingen | PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases | September 20, 2012

Open source drug discovery can be an influential model for discovering and developing new medicines and diagnostics for neglected diseases. It offers the opportunity to accelerate the discovery progress while keeping expenditures to a minimum by encouraging incremental contributions from volunteer scientists.
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Precision Medicine, Genomics & 'Open Health'

Traditional medicine, integrative medicine, preventive medicine, predictive medicine, regenerative medicine – and now we have 'precision medicine'.

The purpose of this article is to provide a brief introduction and high level overview of 'Precision Medicine' to health information technology (IT) managers and analysts, along with pointers to key resources or sources of information they might want to explore if they decide to delve deeper into the topic. Read More »

Predatory Publishers corrupting 'open access' movement

J. Sanchez | Nature | September 12, 2012

When e-mail first became available, it was a great innovation that made communication fast and cheap. Then came spam — and suddenly, the innovation wasn’t so great. It meant having to filter out irrelevant, deceptive and sometimes offensive messages. It still does.The same corruption of a great idea is now occurring with scholarly open-access publishing. Read More »

Publication Liberation

Connor Emdin | The Varsity | August 25, 2012

Making academic publications freely available to researchers and curious students should be standard practice... Read More »

Research Transparency: 5 Questions about Open Science Answered

Open science is a set of practices designed to make scientific processes and results more transparent and accessible to people outside the research team. It includes making complete research materials, data and lab procedures freely available online to anyone. Many scientists are also proponents of open access, a parallel movement involving making research articles available to read without a subscription or access fee...

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Researchers At Carnegie Mellon University Use Open Source 3D Printers To Rebuild Damaged Hearts

Press Release | Carnegie Mellon University | October 23, 2015

As of this month, over 4,000 Americans are on the waiting list to receive a heart transplant. With failing hearts, these patients have no other options; heart tissue, unlike other parts of the body, is unable to heal itself once it is damaged. Fortunately, recent work by a group at Carnegie Mellon could one day lead to a world in which transplants are no longer necessary to repair damaged organs. "We've been able to take MRI images of coronary arteries and 3-D images of embryonic hearts and 3-D bioprint them with unprecedented resolution and quality out of very soft materials like collagens, alginates and fibrins," said Adam Feinberg, an associate professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University.

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Rice U. Lab Creates Open-Source Optogenetics Hardware, Software

Press Release | Rice University | November 7, 2016

Nobody likes a cheater, but Rice University bioengineering graduate student Karl Gerhardt wants people to copy his answers. That’s the whole point. Gerhardt and Rice colleagues have created the first low-cost, easy-to-use optogenetics hardware platform that biologists who have little or no training in engineering or software design can use to incorporate optogenetics testing in their labs. Rice’s Light Plate Apparatus (LPA) is described in a paper available for free online this week in the open-access journal Scientific Reports...

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Rita Gardner Reflects On Open Access And Learned Societies

British Academy | Socialsciencespace | July 2, 2013

Learned societies are a fundamental part of the research ecology, providing a substantial intellectual, public and reputational good, at minimal cost to the UK public purse. Read More »

Rutgers Chemistry Professor Helen Berman To Receive Benjamin Franklin Award For Open Access In The Life Sciences

Staff Writer | Rutgers | March 25, 2014

Helen M. Berman, Rutgers University Board of Governors Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (CCB) and the Center for Integrative Proteomics Research, has been selected to receive the Benjamin Franklin Award for Open Access in the Life Sciences from Bioinformatics.org, also known as The Bioinformatics Organization, Inc.

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Sage Bionetworks Releases First-of-its-Kind Data from Parkinson’s iPhone Study

Press Release | Sage Bionetworks, mPower | March 3, 2016

Sage Bionetworks, a nonprofit biomedical research organization, today released an unparalleled dataset that captures the everyday experiences of more than 9,500 people to help speed scientific progress toward treatments for people with Parkinson’s disease. The dataset, which consists of millions of data points collected on a nearly-continuous basis through the iPhone app mPower, will provide researchers with unprecedented insight into the daily changes in symptoms and effects of medication for people with Parkinson’s.

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Save The Date: Oct. 21 Open Access Week 2013 Kick Off Event At The World Bank And Online: Redefining Impact

Andrea Higginbotham | Open Access Week | July 24, 2013

SPARC (The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and the World Bank have announced they will co-sponsor the kickoff event for Open Access Week 2013 on Monday October 21st in Washington, DC. Read More »

Scaling Up Health Knowledge at European Level Requires Sharing Integrated Data

Press Release | Dove Medical Press | June 13, 2016

...Dr Menditto continues "Combining databases from multiple countries exploiting common structural elements will help increasing the cohorts both on numerical and geographical coverage aspects. At the moment there is not a gold standard to perform multiple healthcare database integration among different countries and different health systems. The EIP-AHA represents an opportunity to compare practices, identify common needs and establish good practices and harmonized approaches with a view to maximize the effective exploitation of large data sets and provide the basis for studying population cohorts at European level...

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Scientists Are Accidentally Helping Poachers Drive Rare Species to Extinction

If you open Google and start typing “Chinese cave gecko”, the text will auto-populate to “Chinese cave gecko for sale” – just US$150, with delivery. This extremely rare species is just one of an increasingly large number of animals being pushed to extinction in the wild by animal trafficking. What’s shocking is that the illegal trade in Chinese cave geckoes began so soon after they were first scientifically described in the early 2000s. It’s not an isolated case; poachers are trawling scientific papers for information on the location and habits of new, rare species...

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Should All Academic Research Be Free And What Wikipedia Can Teach Us About Publishing

Kalev Leetaru | Forbes | June 14, 2016

Last month the European Union offered a bold and striking call for all scientific literature to be made available to the world free of charge. Many questions remain regarding how such a vision can be made into reality, especially where the funding for such a mandate will come from. Such calls, happening amidst a sea change in the open access debate, offer a powerful moment of reflection into why the vast majority of scholarly research is still walled off from the public that largely pays for it...

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