neuroscience

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A Bionic Eye That Restores Sight

Rachel E. Gross | The Atlantic | August 31, 2014

By bridging the gap between eye and brain, a new device has the capacity to help the blind regain their vision...

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A Hidden Factor in Stroke Severity: the Microbes in Your Gut

Jordana Cepelwicz | Scientific American | March 30, 2016

The bacteria that inhabit our guts have become key players for neuroscientists. A growing body of research links them to a wide array of mental and neurological disorders—from anxiety and depression to schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. Now a study in mice published this week in Nature Medicine suggests that striking the right microbial balance could cause changes in the immune system that significantly reduce brain damage after a stroke—the second leading cause of both death and disability for people around the globe. (Scientific American is part of Springer Nature.)...

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Academia.edu Founder On Open Access Dreams

Richard Price | Times Higher Education | May 8, 2014

Discoveries by laypeople are rare but free access to research results would increase the likelihood, says Richard Price

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Brainstorm Tech Spotlight: Danae Ringelmann, Co-Founder And CCO Indiegogo

Staff Writer | CNN | July 5, 2013

Fortune's Brainstorm Tech Conference (July 22-24 in Aspen, Colo.) regularly brings together the best and brightest minds in tech innovation. Each week, Fortune turns the spotlight on a different conference attendee to offer his or her own personal insight into business, tech, and entrepreneurship. [...] Read More »

Distinguishing Brain From Mind

Sally Satel | Nextgov | May 31, 2013

From the recent announcement of President Obama's BRAIN Initiative to the Technicolor brain scans ("This is your brain on God/love/envy etc") on magazine covers all around, neuroscience has captured the public imagination like never before. Read More »

DIY Lab Technique to Revolutionise Training for Neuroscientists

Press Release | University of Sussex | August 1, 2017

A team of international researchers have come up with an inexpensive way to self-manufacture lab equipment, which could revolutionise the way neuroscientists across the world are trained. In a study published in the open access journal PLOS Biology, Dr Tom Baden from Sussex Neuroscience and André Maia Chagas, from the University of Tübingen, have devised a new imaging and microscope system called “FlyPi”. The equipment needed for modern neuroscience experiments can cost tens or even hundreds of thousands of pounds, which often means only institutions in rich countries can undertake top-level research and scientific training...

Jeff Hawkins: Where Open Source And Machine Learning Meet Big Data

Simon Phipps | InfoWorld | August 9, 2013

The Palm pioneer has turned to neuroscience and big data to create a path to truly intelligent machines -- a path open to the community's contributions Read More »

OpenWorm Is An Open-Source Virtual Worm, Accurate In Every Way

Shaunacy Ferro | PopSci.com | May 2, 2013

Predictive models are essential in engineering fields, but less common in biology, though accurate simulations of living organisms could help us understand disease, drug efficacy and neuroscience. Read More »

Oscars Of Science: Breakthrough Awards Hands Out $21m To Transform Physicists Into Rockstars

Tim Walker | The Independent | December 13, 2013

In Hollywood this week, the talk was all about the Golden Globe nominations, but several hundred miles to the north, Silicon Valley’s biggest names were enjoying a new kind of awards ceremony – and they invited one of the film industry’s favourite sons to host it. Read More »

SUBNETS Aims For Systems-Based Neurotechnology And Understanding For The Treatment of Neuropsychological Illnesses

Press Release | Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) | October 25, 2013

DARPA seeks to develop new technology to enable near real-time measurement and analysis across brain systems to drive precise neural stimulation therapies Read More »

The Technology That Lets Deaf People Hear Could Also Treat Hearing Damage

Rachel Feltman | Quartz | April 23, 2014

When someone’s auditory nerve is damaged, a cochlear implant acts as a substitute for the lack of vital nerve cells...Gary Housley, director of the Translational Neuroscience Facility at the University of New South Wales, has published a study (paywall) demonstrating the process in animal models...

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The World Cup's Mind-Controlled Exoskeleton

Clayton Aldern | The Atlantic | June 4, 2014

It’s rare for scientists to physically showcase their own work in public settings. But that's how science advances...

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Tübingen neuroscientists develop inexpensive, self-manufactured lab equipment

Press Release | University of Tübingen | July 18, 2017

Laboratory equipment is one of the largest cost factors in neuroscience. However, many experiments can be performed with good results using self-assembled setups with 3-D printed components and self-programmed electronics. The inexpensive system called “FlyPi” developed by André Maia Chagas and Tom Baden allows for many standard lab processes including light and fluorescence microscopy, optogenetics, thermogenetics, and behavioural studies in small animals (e.g. round-worms, fruit flies, zebrafish larvae)...

We Turn Brainwaves Into Sound For Music And Medicine

Kat Austen | New Scientist | April 14, 2014

A neuroscientist and a musician explain how they built the Brain Stethoscope, which is both brain scanner and musical instrument...Why is a cellist and sound artist collaborating with someone who deals with brain disorders?

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Wearable For State-Of-Mind Shift Set For 2015

Nancy Owano | Phys.Org | November 12, 2014

How will neuroscience impact daily life? A more topical question might be, how will neuroscience play a role in the business of electronic-device vendors of headsets and other wearables?...

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