Mexico

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California Could Be Hit by an 8.2 Mega-Earthquake, and It Would Be Catastrophic

Rong-Gong Lin II | Los Angeles Times | September 19, 2017

The magnitude 8.2 earthquake that ravaged southern Mexico on Sept. 7 was the largest to shake the country in nearly a century. Like California, Mexico is a seismically active region that has seen smaller quakes that have caused death and destruction. But the Sept. 7 temblor is a reminder that even larger quakes — while rare — do occur. Scientists say it’s possible for Southern California to be hit by a magnitude 8.2 earthquake. Such a quake would be far more destructive to the Los Angeles area because the San Andreas fault runs very close to and underneath densely populated areas...

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Decline Of Monarch Butterflies Linked To Modern Agriculture

Kate Prengaman | Ars Technica | June 5, 2014

The massive migration of monarch butterflies is amazing—the insects go from grazing on milkweed plants as caterpillars in the midwest to spending winters in Mexico. But Monarch populations have been on the decline for some time, with a variety of factors being considered: lost habitat in Mexico, damage from pesticides, or climate change. Read More »

Developing Nations Improving Health Communication Through the Use of DHIS2

DHIS2 implementations are spreading steadily among national health services in developing countries as well as among international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) working to improving health in the developing world through the use of health information technology. As an open source solution, DHIS2 offers developing countries the advantage of adopting a cost-effective and flexible solution for aggregate statistical data collection, validation, analysis, management, and presentation as well as for data sharing between healthcare professionals and facilities. Organizations and individuals who work with humanitarian software solutions will need to know what DHIS2 is, how it works, and how it might be implemented by national health services and other health-related projects across the globe...

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Digitaliza TXT Selected as a Finalist for the 2015 Bio-IT World Award for Its Adoption of Electronic Data Capture ClinCapture

Press Release | Digitaliza TXT | April 15, 2015

Nominated by Clinovo, Digitaliza TXT, the leading technology provider for CROs in Latin America has been selected as one of the finalists for the 2015 Bio-IT Best Practices Award. Digitaliza TXT was nominated for its submission, sharing a real-life case study on transitioning from paper based studies to EDC system ClinCapture, to better support its local and global clients in the clinical trial industry. The Best Practices Awards highlight outstanding examples of how technology innovations and strategic initiatives can be powerful forces for change in the life sciences, from basic biomedical research to drug development and beyond. More than 75 projects have been recognized since 2003.

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e-Global Goes Live with Authentic Open Development Payment Platform

Tabitha Naylor | Mobile Commerce Insider | November 5, 2012

Mexico’s largest electronic payment processor, Servicios Electronicos Globales, e-Global, has gone live with the Authentic Open Development Payment platform provided by Alaric International and Stratus Technologies Mexico. Read More »

Heliox Project to Assist Indigenous Communities Access Computers

Indigenous communities may benefit from new computer technology that allows them to access educational resources and the internet using their own language, says the software’s developer. The innovation comes from an international, interdisciplinary group that is currently working on using the technology to reduce the digital gap and help protect cultural diversity in Mexico. This effort is part of a wider project called Heliox, which is developing a free, inclusive operating system using a version of the existing fully open-source GNU/Linux system. Read More »

In Mexico, A Wiki Makes Corporate Secrets Public

Jessica McKenzie | WeGov | August 20, 2014

Earlier this year the Latin American NGO Poder launched Quién Es Quién Wiki (Who's Who Wiki), a corporate transparency project more than two years in the making. The hope is that the platform will be the foundation for a citizen-led movement demanding transparency and accountability from businesses in Mexico...

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Kids on Computers Establishes Computer Labs in Five Countries

Linux and open source software are not just fueling charities, they are gifting the freedom of education and knowledge to the people the charities are helping because of the low cost, yes, but also the exceptional technology. This sentiment is proven when you look at the work the Linux Foundation does supporting a variety of community initiatives and organizations that are using Linux and open source software. While attending LinuxCon NA 2016 in Toronto I learned of Kids on Computers, one such organization...

Latin American Countries Band Together To Fight Growing Problem Of Investor-State Disputes

Glyn Moody | Techdirt | July 1, 2013

As Techdirt has observed, investor-state dispute resolution (ISDR) is turning into a major weapon that corporations can deploy against nations in order to claim damages for some alleged loss of future profits as a result of government action -- for example, stricter health or environmental regulations. Read More »

Mexican Team Builds Navigation Device For Blind People

Mexican researchers have developed an artificial intelligence navigation system for partially or totally blind people that can sense its surroundings in three dimensions. The prototype device is designed to allow users to freely move from one point to another avoiding both static and moving obstacles, and can learn to recognise colours and utility bills. Read More »

Mexico Sees Its First Open-Source Village Cellphone Network [MX]

Staff Writer | USA Today | September 16, 2013

The communications revolution that swept the globe missed the Zapotec village of Talea de Castro high in the mountains of southern Mexico, where making any sort of call meant trudging to a community telephone line and paying what could be a day's wages for a crackly five-minute conversation. All that has changed, thanks to an ingenious plan that backers hope can bring connections to thousands of other small, isolated villages around the world.

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MIT's Answer to Global Health Issues: Democratizing Big Data Analytics

Michael Kassner | Tech Republic | June 24, 2016

If you think it's hard to keep up with all the new software and hardware innovations, imagine doctors trying to stay abreast of medical advances. "While wonderful new medical discoveries and innovations are in the news every day, doctors struggle with using information and techniques available right now," writes Leo Anthony Celi, assistant professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, in the Conversation commentary Improving patient care by bridging the divide between doctors and data scientists...

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Moving Counter-Clockwise: Lessons from Hurricanes, Floods and Earthquakes

The plethora of natural disasters raises all sorts of complicated but expected issues – from discussions of the legitimacy of global warming to the adequacy (or lack thereof) of on the ground relief efforts. One would have thought that post-Katrina, we would be ready, willing and able to provide immediate relief to those in need of disaster relief...despite capacities, we have been stunningly slow in moving these new services into disaster areas. Instead of technology advancing the ball, it is as if we are moving our clocks backwards. Sure, in the absence of cell towers, creative workarounds have been enabled like ATT&T facilitating communications to/from the mainland for its customers.

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NSA Spying Risks $35 Billion In U.S. Technology Sales

Nicole Gaouette | Bloomberg | November 26, 2013

International anger over the National Security Agency’s Internet surveillance is hurting global sales by American technology companies and setting back U.S. efforts to promote Internet freedom. Read More »

Op-Ed: There’s A Leadership Void In Addressing Critical Geospatial Issues

Kevin Pomfret | Nextgov | November 11, 2013

Last month, nearly 1,000 global government and industry representatives from around the world attended a Mexico-hosted conference on the economic, societal and governmental benefits of geospatial technology. Notably absent were U.S. government officials. [...] Read More »