medical research

See the following -

The Quest For Population Health Management

David F. Carr | InformationWeek | March 4, 2014

Vendors large and small seek to prove they have the right tools for proactively managing patient health, coordinating care across providers, and supporting accountable-care models. Read More »

Troops With Traumatic Brain Injury Show Symptoms 5 Years Later

Bob Brewin | Nextgov | July 3, 2013

A high proportion of the 273,859 troops diagnosed with traumatic brain injury since the start of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq continued to experience “significant symptoms and problems” five years after injury, the Pentagon said in its first take on a 15-year TBI study mandated by Congress. Read More »

Two Years In, What Has Apple ResearchKit Accomplished?

Kate Sheridan | STAT | May 26, 2017

In March 2015, Apple promised to change the way medical research could be done. It launched ResearchKit, which could turn millions of iPhones around the world into a “powerful tool for medical research,” the company said at the time. Since then, ResearchKit — software that gives would-be app developers a library of coding to create health apps on the iPhone and Apple Watch — has spawned a number of studies: One team has used it to create an app to track Parkinson’s symptoms; another is trying out a screening protocol for autism. A third helps people inventory the moles on their skin and evaluate how they have changed over time...

Read More »

UK Funder Explains Clamp-Down On Open Access Violators

Richard Van Noorden | Nature.com | April 9, 2014

Since 2006, the giant medical-research charity Wellcome Trust has asked the researchers it funds to make their articles free to read online. Last year, it turned up pressure on scientists to comply, or see their funding withheld.

Read More »

US Supreme Court to decide if companies can patent Human Genes

Karen McVeigh | The Guardian | April 11, 2013

The US supreme court will hear oral arguments next week to decide whether companies can patent human genes, in a landmark case which could alter the course of US medical research and the battle against diseases such as breast and ovarian cancer. Read More »

VA Researchers Testing Cheaper Clinical Trials Using Tech

Alex Ruoff | Bloomberg BNA | August 25, 2016

Clinicians across more than 30 VA medical centers are taking part in a $10 million randomized clinical trial meant to compare two common treatments for hypertension. These doctors will not, however, noticeably change how they treat their patients or how they collect data about them. In fact, after veterans are enrolled in the trial, they will be asked to continue managing their blood pressure using their regular doctors, unlike in the vast majority of clinical trials where new doctors treat patients and study staff oversee them...

Read More »

We Can Work It Out: Collaboration Leads To Insights, New Targets In Epilepsy

Ron Leuty | Business Times | August 13, 2013

A little scientific cooperation goes a long way. Epilepsy researchers, who more than a decade ago forged a national collaboration, have discovered 25 new mutations around the neurological disorder. What’s more, they also uncovered two genes behind rare childhood forms of the disease... Read More »

Wellcome Joins Chorus Calling for Free Online Access to Medical Research

Ryan McBride | FierceBiotechIT | April 10, 2012

Wellcome Trust no longer wants to pay for medical research that ends up guarded behind a pay wall, and the U.K.'s largest private funder of medical research is considering several ways to bring a proverbial wrecking ball to such pay walls and make research papers available for free online under an open-access framework. Read More »

Wellcome Trust Joins 'Academic Spring' to Open Up Science

Alok Jha | The Guardian | May 9, 2012

One of the world's largest funders of science is to throw its weight behind a growing campaign to break the stranglehold of academic journals and allow all research papers to be shared online. Read More »

Why Do Female Scientists Receive Less Funding?

Jeremy Farrar | The Independent | December 11, 2013

Yesterday in Stockholm, eight scientists received their Nobel prizes, for medicine, physics and chemistry. All of them are men. At the same time – and by complete coincidence – this newspaper ran a story 'Women scientists less likely to receive funding', based on a study published in the journal BMJ Open Access. The connection is not too difficult to make. Read More »

Why Open Source Drug Discovery Needs A “Champion”

Sean Ekins | Collaborative Chemistry | April 5, 2013

Yesterday I attended the Southeast Venture Philanthropy Summit held in Chapel Hill. Attendees included VC, philanthropy types, disease foundations (big and small), bioscience organizations, scientists from all over the country... Read More »

Yes, You Can Reconcile The Wide Sharing Of Personal Medical Research Data With Greater Participant Control

Glynn Moody | TechDirt | March 15, 2016

Although the benefits of sharing big datasets are well-known, so are the privacy issues that can arise as a result. The tension between a desire to share information widely and the need to respect the wishes of those to whom it refers is probably most acute in the medical world. Although the hope is that aggregating health data on a large scale can provide new insights into diseases and their treatments, doing so makes issues of consent even trickier to deal with. A new study of Parkinson's disease from Sage Bionetworks, which describes itself as a "non-profit biomedical research organization," takes a particularly interesting approach. Unusually, it used an iPhone app to gather data directly from the participants...

Read More »

Strata 2014: Making Data Work

Event Details
Type: 
Conference
Date: 
February 11, 2014 - 8:00am - February 13, 2014 - 5:00pm
Location: 
Santa Clara, CA
United States

Join us at the O'Reilly Strata Conference in Santa Clara to get a clear perspective on the future of big data—as well as all the analytics, architectures, techniques, tools, and technologies you need to use data successfully right now.

The depth and breadth of what's covered at Strata requires 7 different tracks just to organize it all. You can follow one track from beginning to end, or just select the individual sessions that most interest you.

Read More »