Lawrence Lessig

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A Primer on the Open Source Movement from a Health Care Perspective

Open source, in myriad forms, has emerged as a significant development model that drives both innovation and technological dispersion. Ignore it at your peril, as did the major computer companies destroyed or totally remade by Linux and free software, or encyclopedia publishers by Wikipedia, or journalists and marketers by social media. The term "open source" was associated first with free software, but it goes far beyond software now. People around the world use open hardware, demand open government, share open data, and--yes--pursue open health. The field of health, in particular, will be transformed by open source principles in software, in research, in consultations and telemedicine, and in the various forms of data sharing all these processes call for.

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Aaron Swartz’s Suicide Triggers Response From Top U.S. Lawmakers

Sam Gustin | Time | January 16, 2013

Aaron Swartz, the brilliant and mercurial young programmer who killed himself in Brooklyn last Friday, was memorialized in his hometown of Highland Park, Ill., Tuesday, as the shockwaves from his death reached Washington, D.C. Read More »

Brian Knappenberger On Capturing The Life And Death Of Aaron Swartz In The Internet’s Own Boy

Jon Dekel | National Post | April 24, 2014

In 1986, the U.S. Congress, spooked by the fictional film War Games — in which a hacker unwittingly almost kicks off the Third World War by breaking into NORAD’s supercomputer — enacted the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). Nearly three decades later, that same anachronistic law became the basis of the overzealous prosecution and ultimate suicide of one of the online world’s most prodigious sons.

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Carmen Ortiz And Stephen Heymann: Accountability For Prosecutorial Abuse

Glenn Greenwald | The Guardian | January 16, 2013

Imposing real consequences on these federal prosecutors in the Aaron Swartz case is vital for both justice and reform Read More »

Darrell Issa Probing Prosecution Of Aaron Swartz, Internet Pioneer Who Killed Himself

Ryan J. Reilly, Ryan Grim, Zach Carter | Huffington Post | January 15, 2013

House Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) is investigating the Justice Department's prosecution of Aaron Swartz, the Internet activist who committed suicide on Friday after fighting felony hacking charges for two years. [...] Read More »

Ethics, Archaeology, And Open Access

Eric Kansa | ASOR Blog | January 16, 2013

The issue of open access to scholarly works recently gained renewed attention following the tragic suicide of Aaron Swartz, an Internet activist charged with felony computer and intellectual property crimes involving the mass download of articles from JSTOR. Read More »

Farewell To Aaron Swartz, An Extraordinary Hacker And Activist

Peter Eckersley | Electronic Frontier Foundation | January 12, 2013

Yesterday Aaron Swartz, a close friend and collaborator of ours, committed suicide. This is a tragic end to a brief and extraordinary life. Aaron did more than almost anyone to make the Internet a thriving ecosystem for open knowledge, and to keep it that way. His contributions were numerous, and some of them were indispensable. Read More »

How Aaron Swartz Helped Inspire The Super PAC To End All Super PACs

Sam Gustin | Motherboard | June 30, 2014

Several years ago, the late internet activist Aaron Swartz had a conversation with one of his mentors, Harvard Law School professor Lawrence Lessig, that would change Lessig’s future...Swartz challenged Lessig to reevaluate his life's mission...

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Justice System "Overreach" Blamed In Suicide Of Open-Access Technology Activist

Declan Butler | Scientific American | January 15, 2013

Aaron Swartz faced an imminent trial for having downloaded some four million articles from a not-for-profit scholarly archive, and a possible penalty of 35 years in prison and a $1-million fine, which some call disproportionate to his actions Read More »

Late Digital Rights Activist, International Access To Knowledge Advocate, And NSA Spying Journalists Win EFF Pioneer Awards

Press Release | Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) | August 21, 2013

EFF to Honor Aaron Swartz, James Love, and Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras Next Month in San Francisco Ceremony Read More »

Lawrence Lessig Lecture On Aaron Swartz, Law And Justice In The Digital Age

D.S. Wright | FDL | February 21, 2013

Lawrence Lessig marked his appointment as Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School with a lecture titled “Aaron’s Laws: Law and Justice in a Digital Age.” Read More »

See The Inspiring Story Of Aaron Swartz On Vimeo On Demand

Jason Sondhi | Vimeo | June 30, 2014

Today marks the premiere of a Vimeo On Demand title that we’re supremely excited to share. Brian Knappenberger (We Are Legion) directs the story of Aaron Swartz, a technological wunderkind whose suicide in January 2013 rocked the Internet community and prompted a tremendous outpouring of sadness for a person who became known as “The Internet’s Own Boy.”...

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The Internet’s Own Boy Review: Remembering—And Honoring—Aaron Swartz

Sam Machkovech | Ars Technica | July 19, 2014

Documentary overcomes bias to tell reddit co-founder's tragic, remarkable story...

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The New Aaron Swartz Documentary At Sundance

Tim Wu | The New Yorker | January 21, 2014

“The Internet’s Own Boy,” a documentary about the life and death of Aaron Swartz, premièred on Monday at the Sundance Film Festival, where it received a standing ovation. The life of Swartz as a coder and an Internet thinker is well known. [...] The documentary, shot in the course of that year, gives us relatively little new information about the legal controversy, but it is deeply revealing about who Swartz was. Read More »

‘The Internet’s Own Boy’: Brian Knappenberger Chronicles Tragedy Of Web Activist Aaron Swartz

Daniel Eagan | Film Journal | June 20, 2014

When Aaron Swartz committed suicide on January 11, 2013, he was facing a possible 35-year prison sentence and a million-dollar fine. Federal prosecutors had targeted him for using an MIT computer network to download 4.7 million documents from the JSTOR database...

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