Journal of Medical Internet Research

See the following -

AMA CEO Calls Digital Products Modern-Day ‘Snake Oil’

Greg Slabodkin | Health Data Management | June 13, 2016

When it comes to electronic health record technology, the American Medical Association has been an outspoken critic about what it perceives as the shortcomings of EHRs, voicing the widespread dissatisfaction of the doctors who use the systems. However, the nation’s largest physician group is now taking aim at new and emerging health IT technologies—such as mobile healthcare apps—that it believes are leading to practice disruption...

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Instead of a Weapon For Health Care Improvement, Monitoring Becomes Another Battleground

Andy Oram | EMR & EHR | September 3, 2015

If you wax enthusiastic about “patient engagement,” or work with health and fitness devices, or want to derive useful data from patient monitoring in the field, or–basically–read this blog for any reason at all, you should check out a recent study in the Journal of Medical Internet Research. It warns about psychological and logistical factors that trip us up when we try to get patients to monitor their vital signs. The paper has a catchier title than most: “You Get Reminded You’re a Sick Person”: Personal Data Tracking and Patients With Multiple Chronic Conditions (citation: J Med Internet Res 2015;17(8):e202)...

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Open source EHR platform tailored to treat Ebola patients

Greg Slabodkin | Health Data Management | August 23, 2017

An open-source electronic health record system developed to treat Ebola patients during the recent epidemic in West Africa is being touted as a potential solution for clinical data collection in highly infectious environments and resource-constrained healthcare settings. Implemented two years ago at Save the Children International’s Kerry Town Ebola treatment center in Sierra Leone, the EHR leverages a Java-based web application called OpenMRS that enables the design of a customized medical records system with no programming.

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Personal Health Record Adoption Rates Exceed MU Requirements

Sara Heath | Patient Engagement HIT | March 31, 2016

Personal health record adoption is expected to reach nearly 75 percent by 2020, far surpassing what's expected in meaningful use patient engagement requirements.
Patient preferences for engagement tools, such as personal health records, may be outpacing meaningful use’s patient engagement requirements, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research...

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Science Journal Examines Key Role of Open Source EHR in Ending Ebola Epidemic in Sierra Leone

The prestigious, open access, Journal of Medical Internet Research recently published a study looking at the effectiveness of OpenMRS’ use during the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic in West Africa. The article highlights the work of a team who developed new user-interface components for OpenMRS and rapidly deployed the system in an Ebola Treatment Centre (ETC) in Sierra Leone. The team, composed of members from OpenMRS, Save the Children International, Thoughtworks, The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Partners In Health, University of Leeds, and Columbia University. The team came together in response to an urgent request for healthIT from colleagues at Save the Children International to develop an EHR suitable for deployment in a new Ebola treatment Centre being set up in Kerry Town outside the capital, Freetown.

VA’s PHR And Portal Not Reaching High-Priority Vets

Greg Slabodkin | HealthData Management | December 15, 2014

Though millions of U.S. veterans have registered for the My HealtheVet personal health record and patient portal developed by the Veterans Health Administration, opportunities are being missed for those with specific medical conditions that require intensive treatment and self-management...

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