Johns Hopkins University

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AHIP Speakers: Soaring Drug Prices Reach Crisis Stage

Ryan Basen | MedPage Today | March 9, 2017

On the same day that President Trump met with Democratic leaders to discuss controlling prescription drug costs, physician advocates and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) debated and vented about drug costs at the America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) National Health Policy Conference. "The system is broken right now," Marilyn Tavenner, AHIP's CEO and former administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, said Wednesday...

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Baltimore Medical Students Create Secure Open Source EMR for Homeless Patients

Press Release | John Hopkins University, University of Maryland | October 22, 2012

A free medical clinic serving Baltimore's homeless and uninsured residents now has its first electronic medical record system for patients—a project conceived and implemented by medical students at the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland. It is the first electronic medical record (EMR) system developed by students for use by free clinics that cannot afford a commercial EMR system.

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Deaths By Medical Mistakes Hit Records

Erin McCann | Healthcare IT News | July 18, 2014

It's a chilling reality – one often overlooked in annual mortality statistics: Preventable medical errors persist as the No. 3 killer in the U.S. – third only to heart disease and cancer – claiming the lives of some 400,000 people each year...

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Enabling ParaView Interaction with ITK and Slicer

Staff | Kitware Blog | June 18, 2010

A joint project by Johns Hopkins University's Center for Imaging Science, under Michael Miller, and Kitware, under Will Schroeder, is leading to new functionality in ParaView, to facilitate its use by JHU in order to empower its Computational Anatomy research. Read More »

Four Takeaways from EHRA’s Health IT Usability Summit

Erin Dietsche | Med City News | July 4, 2017

 

On June 21, the Electronic Health Records Association held its second annual Shaping Usability of Health IT Summit. The event brought together more than 70 individuals, including physicians, EHR developers and even ONC Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health Technology Reform John Fleming. Mandy Long, chair of the EHRA Clinician Experience Workgroup and vice president of corporate operations at Modernizing Medicine, co-hosted the summit. In a recent phone interview, Long outlined a few key highlights of the event...

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Get Ready For Some Really Bad Space Weather

Bob Brewin | Nextgov | September 21, 2012

That’s the message from four space scientists at the John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory who warned of increased solar activity -- which can disrupt all types of communications, including GPS signals -- with the sun pumping out more solar flares over the next five years than any time since 2003. Read More »

Inside the Drive to Collect DNA from 1M Veterans and Revolutionize Medicine

Jeffrey Delviscio, Alex Hogan, Hyacinth Empinado and Alissa Ambrose | Fox News | September 15, 2016

The Department of Veterans Affairs is gathering blood from 1 million veterans and sequencing their DNA. At the same time, computer scientists are creating a database that combines those genetic sequences with electronic medical records and other information about veterans’ health. The ultimate goal of the project, known as the Million Veteran Program, is to uncover clues about disorders ranging from diabetes to post-traumatic stress disorder...

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International Conference on Disaster Medicine and Hurricane Resiliency Draws Hundreds

Press Release | American University of the Caribbean | March 20, 2019

More than 280 healthcare professionals, emergency preparedness experts, and government leaders gathered on campus March 8-11 with the goal of uniting their collective experience and expertise to increase their communities’ ability to manage hurricanes and other disasters. Attendees represented 12 countries, including 9 Caribbean islands, and a multitude of backgrounds in disaster preparedness and response, including disaster medicine and veterinary medicine, nursing, hospital administration, mental health, telehealth, EMS and first responders, disaster recovery and humanitarian assistance, medical education, and more.

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Is the 2015 Nobel Prize a turning point for traditional Chinese medicine?

So the Nobel Prize is not only acknowledging this complete transformation of a Chinese herb through modern biomedical science into something powerfully efficacious, but also the millions of lives saved because of its successful application worldwide, particularly in the developing world. But there’s something else that marks Tu as extraordinary vis-à-vis both her two fellow Nobel Laureates for medicine, William C Campbell and Satoshi Ōmura, and her more Western medically oriented colleagues in pharmacology. She embodies, in both her history and her research, what I call medical bilingualism – the ability not only to read in two different medical languages but to understand their different histories, conceptual differences, and, most importantly for this unexpected news, potential value for therapeutic interventions in the present.

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New Gene Sequencing Software Could Aid in Early Detection, Treatment of Cancer

Press Release | Johns Hopkins University | February 23, 2017

A research team from the United States and Canada has developed and successfully tested new computational software that determines whether a human DNA sample includes an epigenetic add-on linked to cancer and other adverse health conditions. In the Feb. 20 issue of the journal Nature Methods, team members from Johns Hopkins University, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and the University of Toronto detailed their promising new method of detecting the presence of an extra mark on DNA called cytosine methylation...

New Open Source Gene Sequencing Software Could Aid in Early Detection, Treatment of Cancer

Press Release | Johns Hopkins University | February 23, 2017

A research team from the United States and Canada has developed and successfully tested new computational software that determines whether a human DNA sample includes an epigenetic add-on linked to cancer and other adverse health conditions. In the Feb. 20 issue of the journal Nature Methods, team members from Johns Hopkins University, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and the University of Toronto detailed their promising new method of detecting the presence of an extra mark on DNA called cytosine methylation...

Popular Heartburn Drugs May Cause Serious Kidney Damage

Kristina Sauerwein | the Source | May 5, 2016

Extended use of drugs to treat heartburn, ulcers and acid reflux may lead to serious kidney damage, including kidney failure, according to a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System. More than 15 million Americans have prescriptions for so-called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which decrease gastric acid production and generally have been considered safe...

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Revealed: The NSA’s Secret Campaign to Crack, Undermine Internet Security

Jeff Larson, Nicole Perlroth, Scott Shane | ProPublica, New York Times | September 5, 2013

Newly revealed documents show that the NSA has circumvented or cracked much of the encryption that automatically secures the emails, Web searches, Internet chats and phone calls of Americans and others around the world. The project, referred to internally by the codename Bullrun, also includes efforts to weaken the encryption standards adopted by software developers. Read More »

Rural Indian Villages Are About to Get Lifesaving Treatment Through an App

Selena Larson | CNN | October 3, 2016

Intelehealth, founded by students at Johns Hopkins University, makes an app that lets health workers in rural communities act as a proxy for doctors who are unable to work in underserved areas themselves. India has just one doctor for every 1,700 people, and while 70% of the population is in rural areas, about 60% of the healthcare infrastructure is in cities. Health workers in remote areas are trained on very basic care -- they can't offer tests or consults on things like diabetes or asthma, according toIntelehealth founder and CEO Neha Goel.

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Seizures Tracked with Apple Watch App Linked to Stress, Missed Sleep

Press Release | American Academy of Neurology | February 21, 2017

New research using an Apple Watch app to track seizures in people with epilepsy finds triggers are often stress and missed sleep, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. For the 10-month study, 598 people signed up to track their seizures with an app called EpiWatch built using ResearchKit, a software framework designed by Apple to make it easy for researchers to gather data more frequently and more accurately from participants using iPhone and Apple Watch...