Johns Hopkins

See the following -

Applying The Lessons Learned In Other Industries To Health Care

Margalit Gur-Arie | KevinMD.com | May 22, 2014

While grappling with the costs and imperfections of our health care system in recent years, a multitude of experts in the field found it useful and enlightening to compare health care to a variety of more familiar industries, and to suggest that health care should adopt operational models that have been shown to work well in those other industries...

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Direct Secure Messaging Makes Big Impact In Chicago Behavioral Health Community

Erica Galvez | Health IT Buzz | September 5, 2012

Individuals with serious mental illnesses are 2.6 times more likely than the general public to develop cancer and nearly twice as likely to end up in an emergency or inpatient department with a serious injury, according to recent studies conducted at Johns Hopkins. Read More »

Ebola Can Attack From Hazmat Suit Surfaces

Sheila M. Eldred | Discovery News | September 9, 2014

Over 120 health care workers have died in the Ebola outbreak. Now, doctors are warning each other to be ever-vigilant in precautions, down to how to take off protective gear at the end of a shift...

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Good Ideas From Unexpected Places: Thinking Creatively for Healthcare Innovation

How about this: in Harvard Business Review, two leaders at Johns Hopkins suggested that hospitals could learn something about buying equipment from -- drum roll, please -- the airline industry. You don't often find many people defending airlines these days, much less holding them up as good examples of anything (except, perhaps, about what not to do, what with overbooking, cramped leg space, plenty of add-on fees, and, of course, dragging paying passengers off planes).  That their recommendations make sense probably says more, though, about how poorly health care often does things than how well airlines do...

Healthcare: We Get What We Pay For

Politico (Dan Diamond) had two great pieces last week -- one on how tax-exempt hospitals benefited from the Affordable Care Act (ACA) while cutting charity care, and the second on how the Cleveland Clinic has built an island of prosperity amidst an impoverished community.  I'd like to say I'm surprised, but I'm not.  I wrote about the supposed community benefits of "non-profit" hospitals two years ago, and Politico's analysis suggests things are getting worse. They looked at the top seven hospitals, as ranked by U.S. News & World Report, and found...

How Superbugs Hitch A Ride From Hog Farms Into Your Community

Tom Philpott | Mother Jones | September 13, 2014

Factory-scale farms don't just house hundreds of genetically similar animals in tight quarters over vast cesspools collecting their waste...And when you dose the animals daily with small amounts of antibiotics—a common practice—the bacteria strains in these vast germ reservoirs quite naturally develop the ability to withstand anti-bacterial treatments...

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Inaugural Blueprint Health Startups Pitch Investors On Disrupting Health Industry

Adrianne Jeffries | Observer.com | March 29, 2012

Nine startups demo’ed today at Blueprint Health, the health-tech startup incubator nestled in a Soho office that opened its first session in January. Read More »

Johns Hopkins Releases 'Open Source' Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES)

Press Release | NewsWise | July 1, 2013

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC) have released the Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) Read More »

Quality Matters: "Hospital at Home" Programs Improve Outcomes, Lower Costs But Face Resistance from Providers and Payers

Sarah Klein | The Commonwealth Fund | August 1, 2011

Hospital at home programs that enable patients to receive acute care at home have proven effective in reducing complications while cutting the cost of care by 30 percent or more, leading to entrepreneurial efforts to promote their use. But widespread adoption of the model in the U.S. has been hampered by physicians’ concerns about patient safety, as well as legal risk, and by the reluctance of payers, including Medicare, to reimburse providers for delivering services in home settings. Read More »

Rise of Drones for Medical Supply Delivery

This is not going to all be about getting your books, or your socks, or even your new HD television faster. It is going to impact many industries -- including health care. And that impact has already started to happen. Zipline International, for example, is already delivering medical supplies by drone in Rwanda. They deliver directly to isolated clinics despite any intervening "challenging terrain and gaps in infrastructure." They plan to limit themselves to medical supplies, but not only in developing countries; they see rural areas in the U.S. as potential opportunities as well. Last fall they raised $25 million in Series B funding. Drones are also being considered for medical supply delivery in Guyana, Haiti, and the Philippines...

Study Suggests Medical Errors Now Third Leading Cause of Death in the U.S.

Press Release | Johns Hopkins Medicine | May 3, 2016

Analyzing medical death rate data over an eight-year period, Johns Hopkins patient safety experts have calculated that more than 250,000 deaths per year are due to medical error in the U.S. Their figure, published May 3 in The BMJ, surpasses the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) third leading cause of death — respiratory disease, which kills close to 150,000 people per year. The Johns Hopkins team says the CDC’s way of collecting national health statistics fails to classify medical errors separately on the death certificate. The researchers are advocating for updated criteria for classifying deaths on death certificates.

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Surgical Robots to Provide Open-Source Platform for Medical Robotics Research

Hannah Hickey | HealthCanal.com | January 12, 2012

In a basement on the University of Washington campus perch seven identical robots. Named Raven, each has two winglike arms that end in tiny claws designed to perform surgery on a simulated patient. Read More »

Why There Will Never Be an Uber for Healthcare

Tom Valenti | TechCrunch | June 11, 2016

You should walk away from anyone who says there can be an “Uber for healthcare.” It is the equivalent of someone saying they “have a bridge to sell you.” Or, more precisely, it shows a complete lack of understanding for how healthcare works and how positive health outcomes are actually achieved. Why do we keep hearing “Uber for healthcare”?...

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World's First Mobile App For Complete Family Health Care Premieres In Austin

Press Release | Medici | October 17, 2016

Medici, an Austin-based company with leadership from Johns Hopkins, Amazon, eBay, McKinsey, KPMG and others officially launches its health care service. Medici allows patients to securely text with their own doctor, vet, therapist and more through a HIPAA-compliant app. Offered first this week in Austin, Medici plans to extend the service to all of Texas this month and then release it nationally. Medici is safer and more compliant with the laws of states like Texas that have wrestled with services offering treatment with no established doctor-patient relationship, says Medici Founder and CEO Clinton Phillips...

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