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15 Blockchain Whitepapers Awarded Winners of US Department of Health and Human Services Challenge

Luke Parker | Brave New Coin | August 30, 2016

A challenge held by the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)  to encourage Blockchain use in the Health Information Technology field resulted in 15 winning whitepapers. The Department’s Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) first announced the “Use of Blockchain in Health IT and Health-Related Research” challenge in July...

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A Doctor Leverages Open Source to Learn How to Code And Improve Medical Care in Africa

Judy Gichoya is a medical doctor from Kenya who became a software developer after joining the open source medical records project, OpenMRS. The open source project creates medical informatics software that helps health professionals collect and present data to improve patient care in developing countries. After seeing how effective the open medical records system was at increasing efficiency and lowering costs for clinics in impoverished areas of Africa, she began hacking on the software herself to help improve it. Then she set up her own implementation in the slums outside Nairobi, and has done the same for dozens of clinics since. This is a classic story of open source contributors, who join in order to scratch an itch. But Gichoya was a doctor, not a programmer. How did she make the leap?

A List of Open Source Tools for College

I've used Linux now for 3 1/2 years, which to me is a substantial period of time. In that time, I have gone from only using LibreOffice to expanding into a purely Linux and open source workflow. I have built my workflow around only using open source software if at all possible, although I am required to use a couple of proprietary tools sparingly. I'd like to share my own philosophy regarding open source. I was first introduced to Linux by my programming teacher; he is a passionate believer in FLOSS and he converted me. I have a passionate belief in the technical superiority of open source tools over proprietary ones because they allow me the freedom to use them however I wish...

A New Android App for Teaching Kids How to Read

Have you been looking for software to help your child to read? Well, your quest may be over. Phoenicia is a new literacy application for Android developed by Michael Hall, an open source software developer, community manager, and technology evangelist currently working at Canonical, maker of Ubuntu. In this interview, he talks about the diagnosis of his oldest child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, his learning curve of Android development, and why user testing matters more than you think...

A New Era Of Application Services At Puppet Labs

Chris Price | Puppet Labs | April 11, 2014

Recently at Puppet Labs, we’ve been putting a lot of thought into how to make our server-side applications faster, smarter, and more modular. Today, we’re excited to give you a sneak peek into the future of some of this work.

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Android, Tizen And The End Of Java

Dean Howell | The Powerbase | February 2, 2012

I wanted to call this piece Life, the Universe and Everything.  If you’re an avid sci-fi reader, or you’ve at least read Hitch-hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, then those words might mean something to you, but this argument is not about the book, or Douglas Adams.  Allow me to explain. Read More »

Angular vs. React: An Epic Battle for Developer Mind Share

Peter Wayner | Info World | March 9, 2017

When the boss says it’s time to pour data into the screens of a bazillion visitors to your website, you have dozens of options for getting up and running fast. In the old days, most work was done on the server, but today much of the heavy lifting has been pushed to the client, making for a zippier, more interactive experience, because the client often has cycles to spare. There are a number of tools for client-side code that shoulder the job of laying out the data and interacting with the user. Two of the latest leading contenders are Angular and React, a pair of open source projects from Google and Facebook, respectively...

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Biotech Democratized: Open Medical Record System

Irsyad Ramthan | Biotechin.Asia | July 22, 2016

Proper management of medical records represents not only a significant technical challenge, but it is also a vital public health tool to ensure proper management of epidemics as well as quality of patient care among other things. In countries with more abundant resources such as the United States, proprietary solutions for managing medical records are the norm, which is perfectly reasonable given that the providers of these solutions are accountable for the security and integrity of the data...

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Building an Open Medical Records System for the Developing World

How do you introduce a woman whose very life is the epitome of humanitarian efficacy? Judy Gichoya is a Kenyan medical doctor specializing in radiology and an experienced programmer who's accelerating the growth of OpenMRS. According to its website, "OpenMRS is a software platform and a reference application which enables design of a customized medical records system with no programming knowledge." Judy first got interested in computers in high school, prior to entering medical school she learned to program at a technical college and through online resources on the internet...

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Christine Doig on Data Science as a Team Discipline

Srini Penchikala | Info Q | August 26, 2016

Data science is about the design and development of solutions to extract insights from data (structured and unstructured) using machine learning and predictive analytics techniques and tools. Data Science as a discipline and Data Scientist as a role have been getting lots of attention in the recent years to solve real world problems with solutions ranging from fraud detection to recommendation engines. Christine Doig, Senior Data Scientist at Continuum Analytics, spoke at this year’s OSCON Conference about data science as a team discipline and how to navigate the data science Python ecosystem.

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Eclipse and Java: An Open Source Trend Analysis

Bill McQuaide | Open Source Delivers | January 12, 2012

2011 was a banner year for the open source community, especially for the Eclipse Foundation, which celebrated its 10th anniversary. In that vein, I decided to look at 2011 open source project trends and compare them to popular Eclipse projects. Read More »

Eclipse Updates Four Key IoT Projects, Launches a New One

Darryl K. Taft | eWeek | June 16, 2016

The Eclipse Foundation announced new releases of four open-source IoT projects to accelerate IoT solution development. The Eclipse Foundation, which has been leading an effort to develop open-source technologies for Internet of things application development, announced that the Eclipse Internet of Things (IoT) Working Group has delivered new releases of four open-source IoT projects the group initiated over a year ago. The four projects, hosted at the Eclipse Foundation, are Eclipse Kura 2.0, Eclipse Paho 1.2, Eclipse SmartHome 0.8 and Eclipse OM2M 1.0. These projects are helping developers rapidly create new IoT solutions based on open source and open standards...

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Hackers Conceal Spyware In Industrial Software Firm's Site To Probe Visitors

Staff Writer | Nextgov.com | September 2, 2014

Unlike most so-called drive-by attacks on websites, which infect visitors’ computers with malware, a strike on a software provider’s website involved a tool that takes detailed notes about visitors’ machines, Computerworld reports...

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Has OpenStack Finally Won Over IBM?

Barb Darrow | GigaOM | February 27, 2012

Updated: Since it launched two years ago, the open-source cloud computing platform OpenStack has won over an impressive array of tech backers, including Dell, Hewlett-Packard and Citrix. But not IBM. Read More »

Hot Programming Trends from 2016

Technology is constantly moving forward—well, maybe not always forward, but always moving. Even for someone who keeps an eye on the trends and their effect on programmers, discerning exactly where things are headed can be a challenge. My clearest glimpse into open source programming trends always comes in the fall when I work with my fellow chairs, Kelsey Hightower and Scott Hanselman, and our fantastic programming committee to sculpt the coming year's OSCON (O'Reilly Open Source Convention). The proposals that we get and the number focused on specific topics turn out to be good indicators of hot trends in the open source world. What follows is an overview of the top programming trends we saw in 2016...