IoT devices

See the following -

Data Breaches Through Wearables Put Target Squarely on IoT in 2017

Ryan Francis | Java World | January 3, 2017

Security needs to be baked into IoT devices for there to be any chance of halting a DDoS attack, according to security experts. Read More »

Five Tech Trends Affecting Healthcare IT Today, and Tomorrow

Technology is evolving faster than ever before, and shows no sign of slowing down. Digital innovation has enhanced the way we operate in almost every aspect of modern life, but in the healthcare industry, technology is not only changing lives, it's saving them too. Outlined below are five technology trends that are taking hold of the healthcare IT industry today, and what developments we can expect to see over the course of 2019 and beyond.

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Open Source Cloud and Middleware Company WSO2 Attracts $20 Million in Funding

Press Release | WSO2, Pacific Controls, Toba Capital | August 13, 2015

WSO2 today announced that it has closed a $20 million funding round led by Pacific Controls, a global provider of Internet of Things (IoT) and machine-to-machine (M2M) solutions, and joined by Toba Capital. The investment comes in the wake of increasing demand for WSO2’s comprehensive, open source middleware platform for building, integrating, managing, securing and analyzing companies’ APIs, applications, and Web services—on-premises, in the cloud, on mobile and IoT devices. 

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Your Toaster May Be Bad For Your Health IT

the cyberattack last week...shut down access to many major websites...What does this have to do with health care?  Plenty, as it turns out.  IoT devices are increasingly helping us manage our health and medical care.  IoT in health care is expected to be a huge market -- perhaps 40% of the total IoT, and worth some $117b by 2020, according to McKinsey.  Expected major uses include wearables, monitors, and implanted medical devices. The problem is that many manufacturers haven't necessarily prepared for cyberattacks.  Kevin Fu, a professor at the University of Michigan's Archimedes Center for Medical Device Security, told CNBC: "the dirty little secret is that most manufacturers did not anticipate the cybersecurity risks when they were designing them [devices] a decade ago, so this is just scratching the surface."

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