information sharing

See the following -

16% of Healthcare Stakeholders Plan to Use Blockchain by 2017

Jennifer Bresnick | Health IT Analytics | January 4, 2017

Blockchain may have entered the healthcare lexicon in 2016 as a somewhat fuzzy concept, but the innovative method of securing and validating data transactions is poised to take the industry by storm over the next twelve months, according to an international survey conducted by IBM. Sixteen percent of the 200 healthcare executives participating in the poll have concrete plans to implement a commercial blockchain solution within their organizations in 2017, while an additional 56 percent are likely to follow by the end of the decade...

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3Rs For Innovating Novel Antibiotics: Sharing Resources, Risks, And Rewards

Anthony D So, Quentin Ruiz-Esparza, Neha Gupta, Otto Cars | BMJ | April 3, 2012

The stream of new antibiotics is struggling to keep up with emerging bacterial resistance. Anthony So and colleagues examine what can be done to increase innovation... Read More »

81% Health Professionals Are Investing In New Technology

Staff Writer | TheInformationDaily.com | April 24, 2013

Ricoh research has revealed that 81% of healthcare professionals across the UK and Europe belong to organisations investing in new technologies. Read More »

Can A Mobile App Boost The Signal About Rare And Neglected Diseases?

Alex Clark | Pistoia Alliance | September 12, 2012

One of the great things about mobile apps is that they are low-profile, easy-to-adopt tools that theoretically could remove traditional barriers between information sources...Nowhere is this more evident, or more important, than in the area of rare and neglected disease research, where disparate (and often desperate) information seekers need better ways to access and share information. Read More »

Government Culture Inhibits Shared Services

Joseph Marks | Nextgov | February 7, 2013

Technology has finally caught up with the will to share services more efficiently in government but federal agencies’ siloed and cautious culture is still a major impediment, the senior adviser to the government’s Chief Information Officers Council said Thursday. Read More »

Groups Warn of Privacy Concerns in Cybersecurity Bills

Josh Smith | Nextgov | February 9, 2012

Civil liberties groups are on the Hill Thursday to warn of the dangers they say cybersecurity proposals could pose to privacy and other civil rights.

The Senate is expected to introduce comprehensive cybersecurity legislation any day and the House has moved forward with several bills designed to increase information sharing between the government and private companies. Read More »

Mainstream Academia Embraces Open Source Hardware

Twenty years ago, even staunch proponents of free and open source software like Richard Stallman questioned the social imperative for free hardware designs. Academics had barely started to consider the concept; the number of papers coming out annually on the topic were less than could be counted on someone's fingers. Not anymore! Not only has the ethical authority of Stallman embraced free hardware and free hardware design, but so has the academic community. Consider the graph below, which shows the number of articles on open source hardware indexed by Google Scholar each year from 2000 to 2017. In the last 17 years, the concept of open source hardware has erupted in ivory towers throughout the world. Now more than 1,000 articles are written on the topic every year.

Monopolies On Medical Knowledge And Information Are Unethical

Dave Chase | Forbes | September 1, 2016

First, let’s acknowledge what we’re not talking about: holding onto knowledge derived from an organization’s years of hard work and learning to outperform the competition. Let’s all agree that protecting one’s secret sauce is critical to compete fiercely and win in the open market...The thing is that sharing information related to patient care is an inherent responsibility if you’re in healthcare–it runs parallel to accepting the Hippocratic Oath. But sharing alone isn’t enough; the responsibility extends to delivering consumable, usable information universally to the point of care. Ask anyone who has ever received a 1,900-page CCDA on a patient. It may very well be compliant, but it’s also absolutely useless.

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The 'Internet of Things' Is Sending Us Back to the Middle Ages

Internet-enabled devices are so common, and so vulnerable, that hackers recently broke into a casino through its fish tank. The tank had internet-connected sensors measuring its temperature and cleanliness. The hackers got into the fish tank’s sensors and then to the computer used to control them, and from there to other parts of the casino’s network. The intruders were able to copy 10 gigabytes of data to somewhere in Finland. By gazing into this fish tank, we can see the problem with “internet of things” devices: We don’t really control them. And it’s not always clear who does – though often software designers and advertisers are involved...

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The Internet? We Built That

Steven Johnson | New York Times | September 21, 2012

Like many of the bedrock technologies that have come to define the digital age, the Internet was created by — and continues to be shaped by — decentralized groups of scientists and programmers and hobbyists (and more than a few entrepreneurs) freely sharing the fruits of their intellectual labor with the entire world... Read More »

The Secret History of FEMA

Garrett M. Graff | Wired | September 3, 2017

FEMA gets no respect. Consider: The two men who are supposed to be helping run the federal government’s disaster response agency had a pretty quiet late August. Even as a once-in-a-thousand-year storm barreled into Houston, these two veterans of disaster response—Daniel A. Craig and Daniel J. Kaniewski—found themselves sitting on their hands. Both had been nominated as deputy administrators in July, but Congress went on its long August recess without taking action on either selection—despite the fact that both are eminently qualified for the jobs.

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VA Aims to Revolutionize Veteran Care with SCAN-ECHO

Kate Spies | Government Health IT | July 11, 2012

Down with the need for lengthy commutes, transportation costs, and too much time – the barriers that often decrease the quality of rural health are officially dissolving. Read More »

VA Patients Ready to Share E-Records, Says Study

Catherine Zaw | Stanford Daily | January 9, 2012

A School of Medicine study found that 80 percent of surveyed Veterans Affairs (VA) patients are interested in sharing their health records electronically with family members, caregivers and outside providers in order to improve their care. Read More »

2014 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo

Event Details
Type: 
Conference
Date: 
April 29, 2014 - 8:00am - May 1, 2014 - 5:00pm
Location: 
Seaport World Trade Center
200 Seaport Boulevard
Boston, MA 02210
United States

The 2014 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo plans to unite 2,500+ life sciences, pharmaceutical, clinical, healthcare, and IT professionals from 30+ countries. The Expo provides the perfect venue to share information and discuss enabling technologies that are driving biomedical research and the drug development process.

Since its debut in 2002, the annual Bio-IT World Conference & Expo has established itself as a premier event showcasing the myriad applications of IT and informatics to biomedical research and the drug discovery enterprise. The 2014 program will feature compelling talks from industry and academia on new trends in data generation, knowledge management, and information technology in life sciences and drug development, including best practice case studies and joint partner presentations relevant to the technologies, research, and regulatory issues of life science, pharmaceutical, clinical and IT professionals.

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