European Union (EU)

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Pursuing Adoption of Free and Open Source Software in Governments

Free and open source software creates a natural — and even necessary — fit with government. I joined a panel this past weekend at the Free Software Foundation conference LibrePlanet on this topic and have covered it previously in a journal article and talk. Our panel focused on barriers to its adoption and steps that free software advocates could take to reach out to government agencies. Read More »

Q&A with Andy Oram: How Can We Tell Whether Predictive Analytics Are Biased?

Andy Oram | Zoom Data | May 24, 2017

The fear of reproducing society's prejudices through computer algorithms is being hotly discussed in both academic publications and the popular press. Just a few of the publications warning about bias in predictive analytics include the New York Times, the Guardian, the Harvard Business Review, and particularly a famous and hotly contested article by Propublica on predictions of recidivism among criminal defendants...

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Rapidly Increasing Acceptance of 'Open Source' Software by EU Nations

The news just keeps coming about the widespread acceptance and increasingly rapid deployment and use of 'open source' software solutions by local and national government agencies across the Euriopean Union (EU). Federal, state, and local government agencies in the U.S. might want to pay close attention.For example, read about OpenEyes in the U.K., or Pentaho Business Intelligence (BI) software being used in France, or ... Read More »

Recommendations For Removing Copyright Hurdles To Scientific Research

Staff Writer | Science Codex | September 3, 2013

The EU e-infrastructure coordination pro-iBiosphere project is preparing the ground for the pursuit of biological research in the digital age. In its "Draft policy for Open Access to data and information" scientists and lawyers recommend that hurdles posed by copyright and database protection should be removed by establishing exceptions for research in a new binding, Europe-wide regulation... Read More »

Should All Academic Research Be Free And What Wikipedia Can Teach Us About Publishing

Kalev Leetaru | Forbes | June 14, 2016

Last month the European Union offered a bold and striking call for all scientific literature to be made available to the world free of charge. Many questions remain regarding how such a vision can be made into reality, especially where the funding for such a mandate will come from. Such calls, happening amidst a sea change in the open access debate, offer a powerful moment of reflection into why the vast majority of scholarly research is still walled off from the public that largely pays for it...

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Strengthening Protection of Patient Medical Data

Adam Tanner | The Century Foundation | January 10, 2017

Americans seeking medical care expect a certain level of privacy. Indeed, the need for patient privacy is a principle dating back to antiquity, and is codified in U.S. law, most notably the Privacy Rule of the 1996 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), which establishes standards that work toward protecting patient health information. But the world of information is rapidly changing, and in this environment, U.S. rules fall precariously short in protecting our medical data...

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That Was The Open Access Week That Was

Stephen Curry | Reciprocal Space | November 5, 2012

A round-up of some of the issues that got an airing during Open Access (OA) Week and in the days that followed, including more rumination on the implementation and implications of the RCUK OA policy, more bad (and some good) publisher behaviour, ideas for new directions in OA publishing and, finally, an important African perspective on the rumbling debate. Read More »

The Case Of The Vanishing Bees

Tom Turner | Earthjustice | May 2, 2014

Pesticides & The Perfect Crime: In the widespread bee die-offs, bees often just vanish. One beekeeper calls it the Perfect Crime—no bodies, no murder weapon, no bees. What's happening to the bees? Read More »

The Dutch Presidency Rises to the Occasion: 15 Council Conclusions That Will Set the Way Forward for R&I in the European Union

Press Release | The League of European Research Universities (LERU) | May 27, 2016

Today, the EU Member State Ministers responsible for Research have adopted conclusions that will set the way forward for research and innovation. These conclusions are the result of the exemplary Dutch Presidency of the EU Council. A Presidency that has put research high on the agenda and has made its actions match its words by delivering on its priorities. The Council conclusions set the course of action on the three main priorities identified by the Dutch Presidency in research and innovation...

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The Grim Propect of Antibiotic Resistance

Staff Writer | The Economist | May 21, 2016

When people hear about antibiotic resistance creating “superbugs”, they tend to think of new diseases and pandemics spreading out of control. The real threat is less flamboyant, but still serious: existing problems getting worse, sometimes dramatically. Infections acquired in hospital are a prime example. They are already a problem, but with more antibiotic resistance they could become a much worse one. Elective surgery, such as hip replacements, now routine, would come to carry what might be seen as unacceptable risk. So might Caesarean sections. The risks of procedures which suppress the immune system, such as organ transplants and cancer chemotherapies, would increase...

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The New Health IT Arms Race Between The US And EU

Nicole Fisher and Ben Heubl | Forbes.com | March 10, 2014

If you were to ask anyone in the United States what “health access” meant to them, you would get a different answer. In the UK, for most people, it means the ability to access National Health Service (NHS) amenities.

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The Web Is in Danger, Copyright Reform Can Break the Internet

Nino Vranešič | El Nino Blog | September 15, 2016

Basic copyright laws and enforcements have been in effect for hundreds of years.
Let’s go back in the history: First Industrial Revolution was based on water and steam power to mechanize production. The second was all about electricity which helped create mass production. The third, connected electronics and information technology to automate production. Now we live in “Fourth Industrial Revolution” which we also call the digital revolution...

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Top 10 Open Source Legal Developments in 2015

In 2015 there were a variety of legal issues of importance to the FOSS (free and open source) community. Continuing the tradition of looking back over the top ten legal developments in FOSS, my selection of the top ten issues for 2015 is as follows:

  1. Settlement of Versata cases interpreting General Public License version 2 (GPLv2)
  2. First decision interpreting General Public License version 3 (GPLv3)
  3. Linux programmer sues VMware for violation of GPLv2 for Linux
  4. Community GPL compliance
  5. European Commission antitrust investigation of Google and its Android operating System (Android OS)...

U.S. Conducts Nuclear Response Exercises

Staff Writer | Defense One | May 12, 2014

U.S. Strategic Command this week is conducting a massive nuclear arms drill designed to “deter and detect strategic attacks” on the United States and allies.  A Sunday press release announcing the May 12-16  “Global Lightning” exercise explicitly noted that the event’s timing is “unrelated to real-world events.”

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U.S. To Begin Ebola Hospital Equipment Lift To Liberia

David Morgan | Reuters | September 17, 2014

The first planeload of hospital equipment in the U.S. military's battle against West Africa's deadly Ebola outbreak will arrive in Liberia on Friday, a senior administration official said on Wednesday...

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