European Union (EU)

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2011 Gov 2.0 Year in Review

Alex Howard | O'Reilly Radar | December 30, 2011

...If you look back at a January interview with Clay Johnson on key trends for Gov 2.0 and open government in 2011, some of his predictions bore out. The House of Representatives did indeed compete with the White House on open government, though not in story lines that played out in the national media or Sunday morning talk shows. Read More »

2011 in Review: Developments in ACTA

Maira Sutton | Electronic Frontier Foundation | December 27, 2011

While Internet blacklist bills exploded into the domestic U.S. Congressional scene this year, foreboding international forces are also posing new threats to the Internet around the world. The most prominent of these is the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), signed by the U.S. in 2011, which would strengthen intellectual property enforcement norms between signatory countries, handing overbroad powers to the content industry to preserve their antiquated business model.

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3D-Printed Huts To Revolutionize Home Building In Poor Countries

Staff Writer | RT News | October 17, 2014

An Italian company believes they have come up with an idea that could improve the lives of hundreds of millions. They have developed an easily transportable printer that can build houses out of natural materials, such as mud or clay...

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5 Initiatives That Pushed the Free Software Envelope in Europe in 2016

The public sector tends to lag—some would say drag—behind the private sector when it comes to adopting new technologies. This is also true when it comes to adopting free software: Although companies widely see free technologies as a boon, government organizations often are still locked into proprietary software and work with closed standards. That said, some countries are making progress moving toward open source technologies...

ACTA Goes Too Far, Says MEP

Charles Arthur | The Guardian | February 1, 2012

The French MEP who resigned his position in charge of negotiating the international Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) has said it "goes too far" by potentially cutting access to lifesaving generic drugs and restricting internet freedom.

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ACTA to Be Examined by Top EU Court

David Meyer | ZDNet UK | February 22, 2012

The European Commission is to refer the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement to Europe's highest court to check that ACTA really does comply with existing EU laws.

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ACTA Update I

Glyn Moody | ComputerworldUK | February 1, 2012

Anyone who follows me on Twitter or identi.ca, or on Google+ will have noticed something of a crescendo of posts about the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) recently. There are two reasons for this.

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ACTA Update II

Glyn Moody | ComputerworldUK | February 2, 2012

Although ACTA is billed as a global treaty, there are only two participants that really matter: the US and the European Union. If either of those dropped out, it would be completely ineffectual. I think the US is unlikely to do that, for two reasons. First, ACTA is essentially the US copyright industries' shopping list of measures that they would like to see forced on the rest of the world: it gives huge benefits to Hollywood and the recording industry, but little to anyone else.

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ACTA's Back

Simon Phipps | opensource.com | February 6, 2012

Now that the US bills SOPA and PIPA have been put on ice, attention has returned to their parent, an international treaty called ACTA. I've written extensively about ACTA before, but in summary it is an international treaty that has been secretly negotiated to ensure as little input as possible from the citizens of any country.

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All Scientific Papers to Be Free by 2020 Under EU Proposals

Nadia Khomami | The Guardian | May 28, 2016

All publicly funded scientific papers published in Europe could be made free to access by 2020, under a “life-changing” reform ordered by the European Union’s science chief, Carlos Moedas. The Competitiveness Council, a gathering of ministers of science, innovation, trade and industry, agreed on the target following a two-day meeting in Brussels last week...

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All Scientific Papers to Be Free by 2020 Under EU Proposals

Nadia Khomami | The Guardian | May 28, 2016

All publicly funded scientific papers published in Europe could be made free to access by 2020, under a “life-changing” reform ordered by the European Union’s science chief, Carlos Moedas. The Competitiveness Council, a gathering of ministers of science, innovation, trade and industry, agreed on the target following a two-day meeting in Brussels last week. The move means publications of the results of research supported by public and public-private funds would be freely available to and reusable by anyone.

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ANALYSIS: Happy Data Privacy Day, Punk!

Kurt Mackie | RedmondMag.com | January 27, 2012

Data Privacy Day starts on January 28, but the parties behind it might not be its best advocates, nor even take the concept seriously. Read More »

Biased Buyers Blocking Open Source

Simon Phipps | Computerworld | August 6, 2012

A recent report shows that 17% of ICT procurement across Europe is biased, with the UK the 4th most common offender. Read More »

Bill Gates Won’t Save You From The Next Ebola

Robert Fortner | Huffington Post | April 30, 2017

In late August 2014, Tom Frieden, then director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traveled to West Africa to assess the raging Ebola crisis. In the five months before Frieden’s visit, Ebola had spread from a village in Guinea, across borders and into cities in Liberia and Sierra Leone. Médecins Sans Frontières, the first international responder on the scene, had run out of staff to treat the rising numbers of sick people and had deemed the outbreak “out of control” back in June...

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Bill Gates Won’t Save You From The Next Ebola Outbreak

Robert Fortner and Alex Park | HuffPost | May 1, 2017

In late August 2014, Tom Frieden, then director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traveled to West Africa to assess the raging Ebola crisis. In the five months before Frieden’s visit, Ebola had spread from a village in Guinea, across borders and into cities in Liberia and Sierra Leone. Médecins Sans Frontières, the first international responder on the scene, had run out of staff to treat the rising numbers of sick people and had deemed the outbreak “out of control” back in June...

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