Europe

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10 Industries 3D Printing Will Disrupt Or Decimate

Lyndsey Gilpin | TechRepublic | February 12, 2014

As it evolves, 3D printing technology is destined to transform almost every major industry and change the way we live, work, and play in the future.  For better or worse, the 3D printing industry is poised to transform nearly every sector of our lives and jumpstart the next industrial revolution.

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3D Printed Medical Devices Market to Grow by Over 17% in 2016 to Reach US$ 279.6 Mn

Press Release | Future Market Insights | October 27, 2016

Future Market Insights delivers key insights on the global 3D printed medical devices market in a new publication titled "3D Printed Medical Devices Market: Global Industry Analysis and Opportunity Assessment, 2016 - 2026". The global 3D printed medical devices market was estimated to be US$ 238 Mn in 2015 and it has a wide scope of growth in the forecast period. The global 3D printed medical devices market can be broadly classified into six segments depending on the technology namely - stereolithography (SLA), selective layer sintering (SLS), digital light processing (DLP), fused deposition modelling (FDM), polyjet / inkjet 3D printing, and electronic beam melting (EBM) - each with different applications that are specific to orthopaedic, dental, and internal and external prosthetics...

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A Disease That’s Three Times More Deadly Than SARS Just Reached The United States

Lily Kuo | Quartz | May 3, 2014

A viral and often fatal respiratory disease in the Middle East has taken a turn for the worse and is spreading throughout the region, as well as to parts of Asia, Europe and now the United States. US officials have just confirmed that a man who fell ill after returning from Saudi Arabia about a week ago has Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). 

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ACTA's Back

Simon Phipps | opensource.com | February 6, 2012

Now that the US bills SOPA and PIPA have been put on ice, attention has returned to their parent, an international treaty called ACTA. I've written extensively about ACTA before, but in summary it is an international treaty that has been secretly negotiated to ensure as little input as possible from the citizens of any country.

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ACTA: “Would Usurp Congressional Authority”

Washington's Blog | Washington's Blog | January 30, 2012

The much-criticized cloak of secrecy that has surrounded the Obama administration’s negotiation of the multilateral Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement was broken Wednesday. The leaked draft of ACTA belies the U.S. trade representative’s assertions that the agreement would not alter U.S. intellectual property law. And it raises the stakes on the constitutionally dubious method by which the administration proposes to make the agreement binding on the United States.

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Antibiotic Use In Chickens: Responsible For Hundreds Of Human Deaths?

Maryn McKenna | Wired | August 9, 2013

In the long back and forth between science and agriculture over the source of antibiotic resistance in humans — Due to antibiotic overuse on farms, or in human medicine? — one question has been stubbornly hard to answer. If antibiotic-resistant bacteria do arise on farms, do they leave the farm and circulate in the wider world? And if they do, how much damage do they do? Read More »

Data Protection Responses To PRISM "A Smokescreen"

Simon Phipps | Computerworld | June 17, 2013

An online privacy expert has denounced European responses to US Internet surveillance and called for legal immunity in Europe for those that report its effects. [...] Read More »

Digitizing Maps Of Malaria Hotspots To Save Lives

Mapping collaboration between Europe and Africa has led to the creation of a digitized malaria mapping database that for the first time brings together all available malaria data, helping tackle a disease that kills more than 660,000 people every year.

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Drugs You Don't Need For Disorders You Don't Have

Jonathon Cohn | The Huffington Post | March 31, 2016

One evening in the late summer of 2015, Lisa Schwartz was watching television at her Vermont home when an ad for a sleeping pill called Belsomra appeared on the screen. Schwartz, a longtime professor at Dartmouth Medical College, usually muted commercials, but she watched this one closely: a 90-second spot featuring a young woman and two slightly cute, slightly creepy fuzzy animals in the shape of the words “sleep” and “wake”...

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EU In 'Denial' That Sick Economy Costs Lives, Health Experts Say

Staff Writer | CNBC | March 27, 2013

Europe's financial crisis is costing lives, with suicides and infectious diseases on the rise, yet politicians are not addressing the problem, health experts said on Wednesday. Read More »

Europe Aims To Regulate The Cloud

Danny Hakim | New York Times | October 6, 2013

In a recent speech, Cameron F. Kerry, the general counsel of the United States Commerce Department, said: “It would be a sad outcome of the surveillance disclosures if they led to an approach to Internet policy-making and governance in which countries became a series of walled gardens with governments holding the keys to locked gates.” ... Read More »

Farm Antibiotics: Still Headed In The Wrong Direction

Maryn McKenna | Phenomena | December 14, 2015

New federal data released at the end of last week indicates that sales of antibiotics for use in food animals in the United States are still rising, despite public pressure to change the practice and condemnation by medicine that farm misuse and overuse is contributing to antibiotic resistance that threatens human health. That’s not good. It’s especially not good because the numbers just released cover the year 2014—the first year in a voluntary three-year period, set by the Food and Drug Administration, during which use of farm antibiotics is supposed to be reduced. If agriculture and the veterinary pharma industry didn’t manage reductions in Year 1, they have a hard task ahead of them to create significant change in Years 2 and 3...

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Feeding A Disease With Fake Drugs

Roger Bate | New York Times | February 5, 2013

Thanks to billions of dollars spent on diagnosis and treatment [for tuberculosis] over the past decade, deaths and infections are slowly declining. Yet a disturbing phenomenon has emerged that could not only reverse any gains we’ve made, but also encourage the spread of a newly resistant form of the disease. Read More »

First European Student Summit On Open Access

Katarina Lovrečić | InTechWeb Blog | May 10, 2011

Right to Research Coalition has announced the first European student summit on Open Access. The event will be held on May, 20-21 at the Humbold University of Berlin, in Germany. Read More »

Focused Only On The US? Here’s What You’re Missing

Russ Koesterich | BlackRock | August 12, 2013

Many investors remain fixated on what’s happening in the United States -- and particularly on what the Federal Reserve will do -- but Russ explains why they shouldn’t lose sight of what’s happening abroad. Read More »