electronic health records (EHRs)

See the following -

What Will It Take To Successfully Implement Health IT Solutions?

Christina Cavoli | Segue Technologies | January 18, 2013

Incorporating health IT solutions to “fix” a troublesome healthcare system has long been touted as the backbone of healthcare reform. Health IT would not only greatly improve the delivery of care through increased performance, it could also largely pay for itself [...]. Read More »

When Medical Informatics Clashes With Medical Culture

Paul Cerrato | InformationWeek | July 19, 2012

Tools are available that can help reduce the number of duplicative or otherwise unnecessary diagnostic tests doctors order. And although their main function is not cost containment, these systems can have a profound effect on the bottom line. EHRs, for example, when properly implemented, can keep clinicians informed of recent lab tests and imaging studies--through the magic of HL7...
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Where HIMSS Can Take Health 2.0

Andy Oram | EMR and HIPAA | March 16, 2017

I was quite privileged to talk to the leaders of Health 2.0, Dr. Indu Subaiya and Matthew Holt, in the busy days after their announced merger with HIMSS. I was revving to talk to them because the Health 2.0 events I have attended have always been stimulating and challenging. I wanted to make sure that after their incorporation into the HIMSS empire they would continue to push clinicians as well as technologists to re-evaluate their workflows, goals, and philosophies...

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Where's The Plan For Interoperability?

John Loonsk | Healthcare IT News | September 22, 2014

Six reasons we will not have health IT interoperability without an architecture...

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While Waiting for a State Health-Records Exchange, Medical Society Launches One

Julia Werth | The CT Mirror | August 18, 2017

Electronic medical records have become common, but the ability to share them easily between providers still lags. Frustrated that after 10 years of effort the state of Connecticut has yet to launch a functioning health information exchange (HIE) allowing physicians, hospitals and other health care providers to share patient medical records, the Connecticut Medical Society is offering one of its own. Available to all clinicians in the state and called CTHealthLink, it is based on a system currently used in Kansas...

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Who Needs An EHR? Some Defense Hospital Emergency Rooms Still Use Paper

Bob Brewin | Nextgov.com | October 2, 2014

Despite investing billions of dollars in information technology over the past decade, three out of seven military hospitals surveyed in a review of the Military Health System reported their emergency rooms still use paper records...

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Who Says Chief Information Officers Can't Lose By Choosing Epic?

Zina Moukheiber | Forbes | July 11, 2013

As the saying goes in health IT circles: You can’t lose your job by picking Epic Systems. With its reputation for consistently high marks, and a prestigious roster of clients, hospital chief information officers view it as a safe bet. Read More »

Whose Data Is It Anyway?

John Moore and Rob Tholemeier | The Health Care Blog | November 20, 2013

A common and somewhat unique aspect to EHR vendor contracts is that the EHR vendor lays claim to the data entered into their system. Rob and I, who co-authored this post, have worked in many industries as analysts. Nowhere, in our collective experience, have we seen such a thing. Read More »

Why 6 U.S. Senators Are Upset About The EHR Incentive Programs

Geralyn Magan | LeadingAge | May 13, 2013

Six U.S. Senators claim that the $35 billion Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs are not achieving their goals and require a “reboot.” Read More »

Why Appropriate Use Outweighs Meaningful Use Of EHR Systems

Kyle Murphy | EHR Intelligence | September 24, 2013

For primary care physicians trained and working with paper records for decades, the introduction of health information technology, specifically EHR systems, into the exam represented a departure from traditional practice as well as a potential disaster if not approached appropriately. Read More »

Why Cloud Hackers Could Come For Your Health Data Next

Todd Campbell | The Motley Fool | September 14, 2014

The revelation that Community Health Systems  (NYSE: CYH  ) servers were hacked, resulting in the loss of 4.5 million patient records, and that a server for the Affordable Care Act's healthcare.gov website was breached, puts the issue of healthcare privacy front and center even as industry watchers warn that health care security is far too lax...

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Why Data Connectivity To Traditional IT Systems And EHRs Should Be A Priority In Your Next-Generation Medical Device Designs

Shahid Shah | MED Device Online | July 11, 2014

...Another major area that’s lacking in medical devices, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers’ (PwC) Top Health Industry Issues of 2014 report, is that of electronic health records (EHRs), health IT, and patient data connectivity. According to PwC, only about 18% of device companies integrate data into clinical workflows and EHRs — this means there’s a very nice opportunity for upstarts and savvy incumbents...

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Why do EHR Firms Own Patient Data When Other Software Vendors Don't?

There's a healthy debate going on about healthcare data interoperability and I think the more we discuss it, the better off we'll be. It's absolutely crucial that all healthcare information systems be able to talk to each other in a way that is useful to both physicians/clinicians as well as patients. The only way to have truly interoperable systems is to have free (but safe and secure) data interchange and exchange requires access rights and an understanding of ownership rules. One part of the discussion that many vendors of electronic health records (EHRs), a large portion of the health IT ecosystem, don't want to have is about the ownership of patient data stored in "their" EHR systems.

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Why Doctors Still Use Pen And Paper

James Fallows | The Atlantic | March 19, 2014

The health-care system is one of the most technology-dependent parts of the American economy, and one of the most primitive. Every patient knows, and dreads, the first stage of any doctor visit: sitting down with a clipboard and filling out forms by hand.

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Why EHRs Are Not (Yet) Disruptive

Ben Wanamaker and Devin Bean | Clayton Christensen Institute | August 8, 2013

[...] EHRs are not unsuccessful because of health care providers’ ineptness. Rather, they are a potentially disruptive technology that got caught in a legacy business model that can only prioritize sustaining innovations. Read More »