DUKE University

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ABLE, DUKE And OSHL Conduct Workshop On Meeting The Challenges Of Developing New Anticancer Therapies

Press Release | Association of Biotechnology Led Enterprises (ABLE), Duke University , Open Source Health Laboratories (OSHL) | September 17, 2012

Strategic planning, clinical trial initiatives, translational research, and regulatory elements of the drug development process were discussed

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Another Reason For Moving To Open Access: Encouraging Scientific Debates

Glyn Moody | Tech Dirt | September 29, 2014

Techdirt has written often enough about how copyright is used to censor criticism. QuestionCopyright.org has an interesting post that offers a variation on that theme: copyright getting in the way of a scientific debate...

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Antimicrobial Resistance Diagnostic Challenge Selects 10 Semifinalists in First Phase of Competition

Press Release | National Institutes of Health | March 27, 2017

Ten semifinalists have been selected in the first phase of the Antimicrobial Resistance Diagnostic Challenge, a federal prize competition that will award up to a total of $20 million in prizes, subject to the availability of funds, for innovative rapid, point-of-need diagnostic tests to combat the emergence and spread of drug resistant bacteria. The semifinalists were selected for their concepts for a diagnostic based on a technical and programmatic evaluation from among 74 submissions. While semifinalists will each receive $50,000 to develop their concepts into prototypes, anyone can submit a prototype to compete in the second phase of the challenge to win up to $100,000...

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Apple Is Quietly Working on Turning Your iPhone into the One-Stop Shop for All Your Medical Info

Christina Farr | CNBC | June 14, 2017

Imagine turning to your iPhone for all your health and medical information — every doctor's visit, lab test result, prescription and other health information, all available in a snapshot on your phone and shared with your doctor on command. No more logging into hospital websites or having to call your previous doctor to get them to forward all that information to your new one. Apple is working on making that scenario a reality...

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Brain-Machine Interface Helps Paraplegic Patients Regain Some Feeling

Press Release | Duke Neurobiology | August 12, 2016

Eight people who have spent years paralyzed from spinal cord injuries have regained partial sensation and muscle control in their lower limbs after training with brain-controlled robotics, according to a study published Aug. 11 in Scientific Reports. The patients used brain-machine interfaces, including a virtual reality system that used their own brain activity to simulate full control of their legs. Videos accompanying the study illustrate their progress. The research -- led by Duke University neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis, M.D., Ph.D., as part of the Walk Again Project in São Paulo, Brazil -- offers promise for people with spinal cord injury, stroke and other conditions to regain strength, mobility and independence.

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Cardiologist Eric Topol on Why We Need to Map the Human Body and “Go Deep” with Big Data

Press Release | Stanford Medicine | May 25, 2017

This year’s Big Data in Biomedicine conference included a passionate talk from cardiologist Eric Topol, MD, of The Scripps Research Institute. Topol, who has been named one of the most influential physician leaders in the United States, described in gripping detail what’s wrong with medical care today and why we need to move forward to the kind of individualized medicine that can make for healthier individuals and healthier populations...

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First Real-Time Efficacy Study on Fertility App Launched

Press Release | Institute for Reproductive Health | February 7, 2017

In what is believed to be the first study of its kind, researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center’s Institute for Reproductive Health (IRH) announced today the launch of a year-long study to measure the efficacy of a new app, Dot™, for avoiding unintended pregnancy as compared to efficacy rates of other family planning methods. The Dot app, available on iPhone and Android devices, is owned by Cycle Technologies. Up to 1,200 Dot Android users will have the opportunity to participate in the study...

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How a University's 3D-Printed Prosthetics Club Provides Devices for Amputees

Last fall, one of the co-founders of Duke University eNable published an article describing our club’s beginnings and visions for the future. In the spring of 2016, we started out as six engineering students with a passion for innovation and design, supported by a small stipend from the Innovation Co-Lab and a grant from OSPRI (Open Source Pedagogy, Research and Innovation), a project supported by Red Hat. Since then we have established ourselves as a presence on campus, grown into a large interdisciplinary team, and connected with multiple recipients—including a young boy in Milot, Haiti. The resources offered through Duke and the sponsorship we've received allow us to continuously transform our ideas into things we can share with open source enthusiasts, makers, and dreamers alike...

How Containers and DevOps Transformed Duke University's IT Department

It's difficult, even in retrospect, to know which came first for us: containers or a shift towards DevOps culture. At Duke University's Office of Information Technology (OIT), we began looking at containers as a way to achieve higher density from the virtualized infrastructure used to host websites. Virtual machine (VM) sprawl had started to become a problem. We favored separating each client's website onto its own VM for both segregation and organization, but steady growth meant we were managing more servers than we could handle. As we looked for ways to lower management overhead and make better use of resources, Docker hit the news, and we began to experiment with containerization for our web applications...

Ken Banks Receives ACM Award for FrontlineSMS Work

Press Release | Association for Computing Machinery | May 10, 2017

Ken Banks, recipient of the Eugene L. Lawier Award for developing Frontline SMS, using mobile technology and text messaging to empower people to share information, organize aid, and reconnect communities during crises. A self-descrived "moble anthropologist," Banks has a gift for building technology that benefits humanity. As someone who was writing code and tinkering with computers since he was 13, Banks instinctively saw an opportunity to harness the world's most-used communications platform--mobile messaging--to help people in the developing world. In 2005, he designed, coded and launched FrontlineSMS, a mobile messaging platform that allows people to subscribe to groups, receive alerts, and establish communication hubs.

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Open Project Collaboration from Elementary to University Classrooms

The practice of teaching should be built upon collaboration and remixing content. When a friend asks us to explain something, we don't trademark our answer or deliver a monologue without asking for input. This is a simple example, but it gets to the heart of the dysfunctional design inherent in our existing education system...19th-century state of education is dangerously out of step with our 21st-century world. Worse, it leaches away our students' passion for academic and lifelong learning. We must infuse the vital, human element of collaboration into our vision for education transformation.

Red Hat Announces 2018 Women in Open Source Award Winners

Press Release | Red Hat | May 8, 2018

Red Hat, Inc...today announced Dana Lewis, founder of the Open Artificial Pancreas System (OpenAPS) movement, and Zui Dighe, a Duke University student, as the 2018 Women in Open Source Award winners. Both will be recognized today at Red Hat Summit, which is taking place in San Francisco this week. In its fourth year, the Women in Open Source Awards were created and sponsored by Red Hat to honor women who make important contributions to open source projects and communities, or those making innovative use of open source methodology.

Red Hat Gift Spurs Open-Source Ideas At Duke

Press Release | Duke I&E, Red Hat, Inc. | November 30, 2016

Kaylyn McGuyrt of Wake Forest, North Carolina, lost her arm in an ATV accident. She now has a clinical-grade prosthetic arm, but many aspects of her job as a cake decorator -- from spinning a cake stand to rolling out fondant -- are difficult. Thanks to a new collaboration between Red Hat, Inc., and Duke University, Duke students are designing a new prosthetic that will help the 26-year-old in her work and other daily tasks...

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Robot-Like Machines Helped People With Spinal Injuries Regain Function

Richard Harris | NPR | August 11, 2016

Scientists with the international scientific collaboration known as the "Walk Again Project" use noninvasive brain-machine interfaces in their efforts to reawaken damaged fibers in the spinal cord. Researchers in Brazil who are trying to help people with spine injuries gain mobility have made a surprising discovery: Injured people doing brain training while interacting with robot-like machines were able to regain some sensation and movement...

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Superbugs Spread Across U.S.

Brian Hughes | Washington Examiner | October 6, 2014

As Americans worry about Ebola, the swiftly spreading virus that has traveled from West Africa to Texas, a more silent killer poses a greater danger...Drug-resistant bacteria killed 23,000 people in America last year and caused 2 million illnesses...

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