collaboration

See the following -

2 Tools for Transforming Senior Management into Open Leaders

This is the third article in our "Open Leadership Development" series. In part 1, I shared how we got started with building a leadership development system for our open organization. In part 2, I walked through four stages of leadership development in an open organization. Now, I'd like to share some leadership tools we've created for our open organization and published on GitHub under a Creative Commons license. One of my favorite homegrown pieces of our open leadership system is the OPT model, which was developed by my colleague Jan Smith, based on her observations within Red Hat and experience working with various leadership models. As you'll see, it's a strengths-based approach to development...

2011 in Review: Developments in ACTA

Maira Sutton | Electronic Frontier Foundation | December 27, 2011

While Internet blacklist bills exploded into the domestic U.S. Congressional scene this year, foreboding international forces are also posing new threats to the Internet around the world. The most prominent of these is the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), signed by the U.S. in 2011, which would strengthen intellectual property enforcement norms between signatory countries, handing overbroad powers to the content industry to preserve their antiquated business model.

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22 Years Later, The Linux And Open Source "Cancer" Is Wonderfully Benign

Matt Asay | ReadWrite | August 27, 2013

Linux just turned 22 and the open source revolution it sparked is just getting started, two experts suggest. Read More »

3 Quality, Coordination Lessons From The Beacons

Anthony Brino | Government Health IT | August 21, 2013

Being able to digitally submit clinical quality measures (CQMs) to Medicare is one of the big promises of health IT for physicians and providers — and it’s still coming, along with other administrative simplifications. Read More »

3D Printed Microscopes to Boost Science in Developing Countries

Press Release | University of Bath | August 1, 2017

Dr Richard Bowman from the Department of Physics, working with collaborators at the University of Cambridge and Tanzanian “digital blacksmiths” STICLab, wants to create much cheaper, open-source devices such as microscopes which can be used for disease diagnosis and scientific research. The three-year project, funded through the Global Challenges Research Fund, is testing and refining a prototype general purpose optical microscope made from mass produced lenses, a Raspberry Pi mini-computer and a 3D-printed plastic frame...

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3D Printing: Saving Soles, One at a Time

Drew Turney | Brisbane Times | September 20, 2017

While some treatment and disability tools, such as wheelchairs, have a one-size-fits-all nature, many are personal to the individual needs of the user or their carers, and it's a tricky balance to manufacture them in small enough numbers to be cost effective for both manufacturers and patients. That's where 3D printing comes in – digitally scanning a user's unique body profile and building the solution on a one-off basis faster and cheaper than a factory tooled up for mass manufacture...

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3Rs For Innovating Novel Antibiotics: Sharing Resources, Risks, And Rewards

Anthony D So, Quentin Ruiz-Esparza, Neha Gupta, Otto Cars | BMJ | April 3, 2012

The stream of new antibiotics is struggling to keep up with emerging bacterial resistance. Anthony So and colleagues examine what can be done to increase innovation... Read More »

4 Big Ways Companies Benefit from Having Open Source Program Offices

In the first article in my series on open source program offices, I took a deep dive into what an open source program office is and why your company might need one. Next I looked at how Google created a new kind of open source program office. In this article, I'll explain a few benefits of having an open source program office. At first glance, one big reason why a company not in the business of software development might more enthusiastically embrace an open source program office is because they have less to lose. After all, they're not gambling with software products that are directly tied to revenue...

40 Healthcare Apps for Clinicians and Consumers to Know

Max Green and Brooke Murphy | Becker’s Health IT & CIO Review | December 16, 2015

It seems like every week in 2015 — if not most days — brought news of a new healthcare startup company whose app garnered millions in early funding. Not all of these apps will take off, and many are still vying to snag the dominant spot in their respective categories. For example, we don't yet know who will become the 'Uber of healthcare' yet, but a handful of companies with clever names and eye-catching platforms are aggressively grappling for the title. The same can be said for apps in the telehealth, prescription management, physician reference, patient portal and house call categories. Here are 40 apps to know from both the provider and patient sides, some of which just might end up edging out the rest come 2016...

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5 Humanitarian Crises Where Open Source Projects Aimed to Bring Stability Government Software

Noah DMello | Computer World | April 26, 2016

Natural disasters, epidemics, terrorism, and uprisings—the world awaits with bated breath for the situation to turn to normalcy for those directly and indirectly affected by these crises. Here are five crises where open source technologists have helped, in some way, to bring stability in these hostile regions. An annoyed user couldn’t fix his printer as the printer’s source code wasn’t available to users. This was the reason that led to the start of the open source movement...

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5 Initiatives That Pushed the Free Software Envelope in Europe in 2016

The public sector tends to lag—some would say drag—behind the private sector when it comes to adopting new technologies. This is also true when it comes to adopting free software: Although companies widely see free technologies as a boon, government organizations often are still locked into proprietary software and work with closed standards. That said, some countries are making progress moving toward open source technologies...

5 Things I Learned at TEDGlobal

Kirsten Cluthe | PCMag.com | July 5, 2012

The theme at TEDGlobal this year was "Radical Openness," indicating the effects of open-source technology, collaboration, social media, and DIY invention on our world. Read More »

6 Cloud Considerations for Health Orgs

Karen Conway | Government Health IT | July 27, 2012

The cloud offers considerable benefits to healthcare, which is undergoing dramatic and essential transformation without the necessary financial or technological means to support the level and speed-of-change required... Read More »

7 Mistakes Your Open Source Project is Probably Making

It can be tough to start a new open source project. You have an awesome idea in your head, but it takes work to turn it into a productive, healthy, engaging community. Sadly (as seems to be the case in practically anything), the same mistakes are made over and over again by new projects. Here are some of the most common mistakes open source projects make and my recommendations for avoiding them... Of the thousands of open source projects that kick off, too many get stuck at the outset because of a bunch of discussions on a Slack channel, mailing list, issue, or elsewhere. The discussions bounce around the house, and the scope often grows more and more lavish to incorporate the many, sundry ideas and considerations...

7 Ways to Discuss Legal Matters with an Open Community

Having watched a fair number of people attempt to engage both the Open Source Initiative's licensing evaluation community and the Apache Software Foundation's legal affairs committee, I'd like to offer some hints and tips for succeeding when it's your turn to conduct a legal discussion with an open community. First and foremost, make sure the person conducting the conversation is both qualified and empowered. Don't send proxies; they simply frustrate the community, who quickly work out that your representative is always playing the second-hand car salesman and going to the back room to ask for a deal...