California

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California's Open Access Bill Encounters A Hurdle, But Gathers Support

Adi Kamdar | Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) | July 5, 2013

California's landmark open access bill, the California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Act (AB 609), has stalled in the State Senate. But take heart—it is far from dead. Read More »

Oregon Struggles To Clear Health Insurance Exchange's High-Tech Hurdle

Staff Writer | Kaiser Health News | December 2, 2013

Oregon's state-based health law online insurance exchange is still struggling in its quest to sign people up, and officials there are using paper applications to get the job done -- a time-consuming task. Exchanges also make news in Kentucky, California, Mississippi and Washington state. Read More »

A Deadly Superbug Appears to Be Invading America's Hospitals

Helen Branswell | The Week | January 23, 2017

A dangerous type of superbug has more tricks up its sleeves than we may be giving it credit for, a recent study suggests. The researchers found that this class of bacteria, CREs — that's short for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae — has more ways to evade antibiotics than have been currently identified, and that these bugs share their tricks readily across the families of bacteria that make up this grouping...

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A Health Hack Wake-Up Call

Niam Yaraghi | US News & World Report | April 1, 2016

Hospitals went digital almost overnight, but they neglected to prioritize patient data protection. U.S. hospitals appear to be under a new type of IT hacking attack: crypto-ransomware. Hackers have changed their approach and instead of stealing patient data, they are now locking down the computer systems of hospitals and asking for a ransom, in bitcoin, in order to allow hospitals to have access to their own computers...

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A Small Paper Problem: The Health Exchanges Face An Avalanche Of Paper Applications

Charles Ornstein | The Health Care Blog | December 12, 2013

When HealthCare.gov and some state-run insurance marketplaces ran into trouble with their websites in October and November, they urged consumers to submit paper applications for coverage. Read More »

AB 609: California Leads On Open Access To Publicly Funded Research

Lisa Peet | Library Journal | November 6, 2014

California has become the first state to mandate open access for the products of some taxpayer-funded research. On September 29 Governor Jerry Brown signed into law the California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Act, coauthored by Assemblyman Brian Nestande (R–Palm Desert) and Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D–Los Angeles)...

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As Fracking Booms, Growing Concerns About Wastewater

Roger Real Drouin | Yale Environment 360 | February 18, 2014

With hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas continuing to proliferate across the U.S., scientists and environmental activists are raising questions about whether millions of gallons of contaminated drilling fluids could be threatening water supplies and human health. Read More »

As Hospital Chains Grow, So Do Their Prices For Care

Chad Terhune | California Healthline | June 13, 2016

As health care consolidation accelerates nationwide, a new study shows that hospital prices in two of California’s largest health systems were 25 percent higher than at other hospitals around the state. Researchers said this gap of nearly $4,000 per patient admission was not due to regional wage differences or hospitals treating sicker patients. Rather, they said California’s two biggest hospital chains, Dignity Health and Sutter Health, had used their market power to win higher rates...

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Baby Birth Costs Vary 10-Fold In Hospitals, Study Finds

Caroline Chen | Bloomberg Sustainability | January 16, 2014

The cost of giving birth at a hospital can vary by tens of thousands of dollars, a price range that is “largely random” and unexplainable by market factors, a California study found. Read More »

California Lawmakers Put Open-Government Measure On Ballot

Patrick McGreevy | Los Angeles Times | September 11, 2013

California voters will get a chance next year to change the state constitution to make sure local government agencies provide open access to public records and meetings. Read More »

California Open Access Legislation Clears Latest Hurdle

David Knutson | PLOS Blogs | May 30, 2013

The House Assembly today passed the California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Act (AB 609). Read More »

California State Senate Bill Seeks to Create Open Source Textbook Library

Curan Mehra | The Daily Californian | February 29, 2012

College students may find relief from high textbook prices in a California State Senate bill that would create a free open source textbook library. State Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, introduced a bill Feb. 8 that would fund a library containing open source textbooks for the 50 most popular lower division courses at the state’s colleges and universities. Read More »

California's Move Toward MOOCs Sends Shock Waves, But Key Questions Remain Unanswered

Lee Gardner and Jeffrey R. Young | The Chronicle of Higher Education | March 14, 2013

Supporters of newly proposed legislation in California hope to reduce the number of students shut out of key courses by forging an unprecedented partnership between traditional public colleges and online-education upstarts. But on Wednesday specific details of how the deal would work were hard to pin down. Read More »

California’s Dream To Be The Saudi Arabia Of Solar Dries Up In The Desert

Todd Woody | Quartz | April 24, 2013

Three years ago California regulators in quick succession approved nine multibillion-dollar solar thermal power plants. They were to be built in the desert and would generate 4,142 megawatts (MW) of carbon-free electricity. The state, it was said, was on its way to becoming the Saudi Arabia of solar. Read More »

Community Health Network in Houston Leverages Open Source Tech to Help Victims of Hurricane Harvey

Undaunted by the devastation caused by Hurricane Harvey in Houston, the Stephen F. Austin Community Health Network (SFA) responded to the crisis by leveraging open source technology to reach out to their patients and victims of the hurricane in areas of Texas that are virtually inaccessible. The Health Network, a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) covering Brazoria County, is one of the areas hardest hit by Hurricane Harvey and currently recovering. Using an advanced cloud-based version of the OpenEMR software, the SFA Community Health Network has been able to treat patients in clinics physically unreachable by their medical providers.

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