AstraZeneca

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Across Pharma, Few Open Arms For Trial Data Sharing

Alex Philippidis | Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN) | July 9, 2013

Industry inches toward consensus on limited sharing as EMA, GSK press for open access. Read More »

Bio-IT World Announces the Winners of Its Tenth Annual Best Practices Awards

Press Release | Bio-IT World, Cambridge Healthtech Institute (CHI) | April 30, 2014

Bio-IT World announced the winners of its tenth annual Best Practices Awards competition this morning in a plenary session at the 2014 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo in Boston. Grand prize winners were named in five life sciences categories highlighting best practices in clinical trial IT, research infrastructure, bioinformatics, cloud computing and data management from AstraZeneca and Tessella, U-BIOPRED, the Pistoia Alliance, Baylor College of Medicine, and Genentech. Read More »

Crowdsourcing a Better Prostate Cancer Prediction Tool

Press Release | University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus | November 15, 2016

Knowing the likely course of cancer can influence treatment decisions. Now a new prediction model published today in Lancet Oncology offers a more accurate prognosis for a patient's metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The approach was as novel as the result - while researchers commonly work in small groups, intentionally isolating their data, the current study embraces the call in Joe Biden's "Cancer Moonshot" to open their question and their data, collecting previously published clinical trial data and calling for worldwide collaboration to evaluate its predictive power...

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Doctors Given Meals by Drug Makers Prescribed More of Their Pills

Ed Silverman | STAT | June 20, 2016

Doctors who were fed meals costing even less than $20 later prescribed certain brand-name pills more often than rival medicines, according to a new analysis published on Monday of a federal database. And in most cases, costlier meals were associated with still higher prescribing rates for Medicare Part D drugs made by the same companies that provided the food. The findings, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, are likely to intensify an ongoing debate over the extent to which ties between drug makers and doctors unduly influence medical practice and the nation’s health care costs...

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Drugs Companies Buy NHS Patient Data, Register Reveals

James Edgar | The Telegraph | April 3, 2014

Some of world's biggest pharmaceutical companies have bought NHS patient data, a new register has revealed.  Drugs corporations including Bayer, Baxter, AstraZeneca and Roche are among dozens of private firms sold information, as well as Bupa, the healthcare provider.

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Drugs You Don't Need For Disorders You Don't Have

Jonathon Cohn | The Huffington Post | March 31, 2016

One evening in the late summer of 2015, Lisa Schwartz was watching television at her Vermont home when an ad for a sleeping pill called Belsomra appeared on the screen. Schwartz, a longtime professor at Dartmouth Medical College, usually muted commercials, but she watched this one closely: a 90-second spot featuring a young woman and two slightly cute, slightly creepy fuzzy animals in the shape of the words “sleep” and “wake”...

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European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) ChEMBL 20 incorporates the Pistoia Alliance’s HELM annotation

Press Release | Pistoia Alliance, European Bioinformatics Institute | February 3, 2015

The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) has released version 20 of ChEMBL, the database of compound bioactivity data and drug targets. ChEMBL now incorporates the Hierarchical Editing Language for Macromolecules (HELM), the macromolecular representation standard recently released by the Pistoia Alliance.

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Funds Crunch Hits India's Drug Development Project

Joe C. Mathew | Business World | April 5, 2014

Lack of funds is threatening the smooth progress of India’s unique Open Source Drug Discovery (OSDD) project, a first of its kind attempt to develop drugs for neglected diseases, when it is entering a crucial phase of research. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh had in February announced that OSDD, the pet project of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), had identified a lead (potential drug candidate) for tuberculosis (TB).  

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I.B.M. Using Bits of Watson for Drug Research

Steve Lohr | The New York Times | December 8, 2011

The ingredients that went into the Watson arsenal are steadily finding their way into I.B.M. products. For example, WellPoint, the big health insurer, is trying out a system that uses Watson-style software to reduce redundant medical tests.

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Is the American Heart Association a Terrorist Organization?

Kevin Michael Geary | Medium | June 21, 2017

A few days ago, the AHA stole the attention of headlines across the globe with a report that sounded like it was straight out of the 1990s: Dietary Fats and Cardiovascular Disease: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association. In this report, the AHA doubled down on their attacks against coconut oil and saturated fat. Frank Sacks, lead author on the report, reportedly said that he has no idea why people think coconut oil is healthy...

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Microsoft Makes Cloud-Based Biological Research Tool Open Source

Michael Stiefel | InfoQ | February 21, 2017

Bio Model Analyzer, a Microsoft cloud-based tool that biologists can use to model cell interactions and communications, is now available as open-source on GitHub under a MIT license. Researchers use Bio Model Analyzer (BMA) to create computer models that can compare the processes within healthy and diseased cells. 

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Precision Medicine Platform Now Open for Collaborative Discovery about Cardiovascular Diseases

Press Release | American Heart Association | March 16, 2017

The American Heart Association Precision Medicine Platform — a global, secure data discovery platform, recently developed in collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) — is now open for use. Researchers, physicians, computational biologists, computer engineers and trainees from around the globe can leverage this cloud-based resource to access and analyze volumes of cardiovascular and stroke data to accelerate the care of patients at risk of the number one killer in the United States and a leading global health threat...

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Research Symbiosis Makes Mathematical Crystal Ball to Gaze into Future of Prostate Cancer Treatment

Press Release | University of Colorado Cancer Center | August 4, 2017

The chemotherapy docetaxel is widely accepted as a standard therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. But 10-20 percent of patients will have adverse side effects that force discontinuation of treatment. These patients may have been better off with another treatment in the first place, but who’s to know before trying the drug which patients will go on to experience debilitating side effects? A crowdsourced competition asked this as an open question. Today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology Clinical Cancer Informatics, competition organizers and participating teams report their findings...

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Sequencing, cloud computing, and analytics meet around genetics and pharma Bio-IT World Shows What is Possible and What Is Being Accomplished

Bio-IT World shows what is possible and what is being accomplished...last week I took the subway downtown and crossed the two wind- and rain-whipped bridges that the city of Boston built to connect to the World Trade Center. I mingled for a day with attendees and exhibitors to find what data-related challenges they’re facing and what the latest solutions are. Here are some of the major themes I turned up...

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Special Report: When the Drugs Don't Work

Kate Kelland and Ben Hirschler | Reuters | March 31, 2011

Welcome to a world where the drugs don't work...for decades scientists have managed to develop new medicines to stay at least one step ahead of an ever-mutating enemy.


Now, though, we may be running out of road. MRSA alone is estimated to kill around 19,000 people every year in the United States -- far more than HIV and AIDS -- and a similar number in Europe. Other drug-resistant superbugs are spreading. Cases of often fatal "extensively drug resistant" tuberculosis have mushroomed over the past few years. A new wave of "super superbugs" with a mutation called NDM 1, which first emerged in India, has now turned up all over the world, from Britain to New Zealand.

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