artificial intelligence (AI)

See the following -

Ok Chatbot: What Is Your Value for Humanitarians?

Emily Aiken and Joseph Agoada | ICT Works | July 20, 2017

Whether or not you are aware of it, you have probably interacted with a chatbot – whether checking your finances, making a travel reservation, or even ordering a pizza. But what opportunities exist to use chatbots to assist humanitarians and development practitioners? Chatbots are conversational computer programs that can read message questions, interpret responses, and perform actions or make decisions, without any assistance from a live person on the other end...

Read More »

On the Need for a Universal Health Record

The current path of progress of the EHR, with its concentration on “meaningful use,” and an intellectual property regime that does not fully exploit the capacity for innovation by end-users is approaching an evolutionary dead-end. It is time to treat the EHR as what it should be: an integral part of medical care that has limitless potential for maximizing the use of information acquired in the provision of health care, and not an impediment to optimal care and a bugaboo for the physician. Read More »

Open Health Guide to HIMSS19

The annual gargantuan HIMSS conference is back in Orlando with over 45,000 participants from more than 90 countries. There will be more than 1,300 vendors at the exhibit floor and more than 300 educational sessions. As with the last several conferences, the focus on open source as the key underlying technologies of health information technologies continues to increase. In previous conferences, we have seen the rise of open source technologies, in particular, those related to interoperability such as FHIR and Blockchain. A large number of sessions at HIMSS19 will be focused on another set of technologies powered largely by open source software and design principles such as artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, and natural language processing.

Read More »

Open source bionic leg: First-of-its-kind platform aims to rapidly advance prosthetics

Press Release | Michigan Engineering | June 5, 2019

A new open-source, artificially intelligent prosthetic leg designed by researchers at the University of Michigan and Shirley Ryan AbilityLab is now available to the scientific community. The leg's free-to-copy design and programming are intended to improve the quality of life of patients and accelerate scientific advances by offering a unified platform to fragmented research efforts across the field of bionics. "Our Open-Source Bionic Leg will enable investigators to efficiently solve challenges associated with controlling bionic legs across a range of activities in the lab and out in the community," said lead designer Elliott Rouse, core faculty at U-M's Robotics Institute and assistant professor of mechanical engineering.

Read More »

Open Source EHR Generator Delivers Healthcare Big Data with FHIR

Jennifer Bresnick | Health IT Analytics | September 8, 2017

Healthcare data analysts frustrated by the lack of access to large volumes of clean, trusted, and complete patient data can now take advantage of an open source EHR data generator platform called Synthea. One million synthetic patient records are currently available within the free online system, which uses HL7 FHIR to allow access to standardized datasets that mimic real electronic health records...

Read More »

Open Source is Helping to Drive the Artificial Intelligence Renaissance

Sam Dean | Ostatic Blog | January 4, 2017

We're only a few days into 2017, and it's already clear that one of the biggest tech categories of this year will be artificial intelligence. The good news is that open source AI tools are proliferating and making it easy for organizations to leverage them. AI is also driving acquisitions. As Computerworld is reporting, in the past year, at least 20 artificial intelligence companies have been acquired, according to CB Insights, a market analysis firm. MIT Technology Review is out with its five big predictions for AI this year. Here is a bit on what they expect, and some of the open source AI tools that you should know about...

Read More »

Open Source Machine Learning Tools are as Good as Humans' in Cancer Surveillance According to Regenstrief, Indiana Univ. Study

Press Release | Indiana University | April 21, 2016

Machine learning has come of age in public health reporting according to researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. They have found that existing algorithms and open source machine learning tools were as good as, or better than, human reviewers in detecting cancer cases using data from free-text pathology reports. The computerized approach was also faster and less resource intensive in comparison to human counterparts.

Read More »

Open Source Oak Ridge Graph Analytics for Medical Innovation Receives R&D 100 Award

Press Release | U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | November 4, 2016

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have received seven R&D 100 Awards in recognition of their significant advancements in science and technology. The honorees were recognized on Nov. 3 at the 54th annual R&D 100 Conference, sponsored by R&D Magazine. The awards, known as the "Oscars of Invention," honor innovative breakthroughs in materials science, biomedicine, consumer products and more from academia, industry and government-sponsored research agencies. This year's seven honors bring ORNL's total of R&D 100 awards to 200 since their inception in 1963...

Read More »

Open Source Projects Are Transforming Machine Learning and AI

Machine learning and artificial intelligence have quickly gained traction with the public through applications such as Apple’s Siri and Microsoft’s Cortana. The true promise of these disciplines, though, extends far beyond simple speech recognition performed on our smartphones.  New, open source tools are arriving that can run on affordable hardware and allow individuals and small organizations to perform prodigious data crunching and predictive tasks.

Read More »

OpenMRS Google Code-In Student Nji Collins Wins Grand Prize

In Nov. 2016, Nji Collins (aka Collin Grimm), a high school student from Bamenda, Cameroon, participated in Google Code-In, the global online coding contest which for pre-university students aged 13 to 17. GCI introduces young talented minds to the incredible open-source world. During the seven-week program, Grimm completed 20 tasks using the Open Medical Record System, or OpenMRS, a platform that focuses on improving healthcare service in developing countries. We spoke with the young programmer to learn more about his story and interest in computer science and how he came to compete in Google Code-In...

Pardon Me, Your Interface Is Showing

In a great post, "Doctor as Designer" Joyce Lee laments the "sad state of product and design in healthcare," and asks "when will device and drug companies create user-centered innovations that actually improve the lives of patients instead of their bottom line?" I heartily agree with Dr. Lee's point, and think the question can be extended to the rest of the health care system. Dr. Lee uses two examples to compare health care to consumer goods. Heinz took a product design -- the glass ketchup bottle -- that had been around for over a hundred years, and greatly improved the user experience by changing to a squeezable "upside down" bottle. This not only kept the ketchup from concentrating at the bottom but also avoided the need to hold the bottle at a special angle or to tap at a particular spot just to get the ketchup out...

Penn Medicine Releases Open Source, 'Self-Service' Artificial Intelligence Tool for Data Analytics

Press Release | Penn Medicine | May 16, 2019

The Penn Medicine Institute for Biomedical Informatics has launched a free, open-source automated machine learning system for data analysis that is designed for anyone to use, from a high school student looking to gain insight on their baseball team's statistics, to trained researchers looking for associations between cancer and environmental factors. "Penn AI," the first widely available tool of its kind, seeks to lower the barrier for entry into artificial intelligence, allowing users to bring in their own datasets or use the several hundred that are available for download within the tool. With a user-friendly dashboard easily run on a laptop, Penn AI is also designed to learn as it goes, ultimately making analysis suggestions based on the "experience" it gains through use.

Read More »

Questions About The FDA’s New Framework For Digital Health

Nathan G. Cortez, Nicolas Terry, and I. Glenn Cohen | Health Affairs Blog | August 16, 2017

In June 2017, the new Food and Drug Administration (FDA) commissioner Scott Gottlieb pre-announced his agency’s Digital Health Innovation Action Plan that indicates notable shifts in the agency’s approach to digital health technologies. This plan is an important step in FDA regulation of this area, a process that began in 2011 with a draft guidance, followed by significant congressional actions. The new changes should not be surprising, given critiques published by Gottlieb prior to re-joining the FDA...

Read More »

Recursion Releases Open Source Data from Largest Ever Dataset of Biological Images, Inviting Data Science Community to Develop New and Improved Machine Learning Algorithms for the Life Sciences Industry

Press Release | Recursion | May 6, 2019

Recursion, a Fast Company "Most Innovative Company" and leader in the artificial intelligence for drug discovery movement, today announced it will open-source a glimpse of the massive biological dataset the company has been building for more than five years. At more than two petabytes, and across more than 10 million different biological contexts, Recursion's data is the world's largest image-based dataset designed specifically for the development of machine learning algorithms in experimental biology and drug discovery.

Read More »

Robots Can Now Officially Imitate Humans

Kabir Chibber | Quartz | June 8, 2014

A computer that has convinced humans it is a 13-year-old Ukrainian boy has potentially passed a benchmark for artificial intelligence for the first time.  The programme, named “Eugene Goostman” and created by Russian developers, managed to convince 33% of the judges that it was human at an event at the Royal Society in London, The Independent reported...

Read More »