Application Programming Interfaces (APIs)

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Sending Medicaid to the Cloud

David Raths | government technology | January 12, 2016

Led by Wyoming, states are ready to pioneer MMIS as a service.

The Wyoming state government already has considerable experience with cloud-based services. It uses Google Apps for Government, NEOGOV for human resources and is looking at Salesforce.com for customer relationship management. But as its Department of Health prepares to issue an RFP to replace its Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS), all eyes in the Medicaid IT sector are on Wyoming because it will be the first time a state has tried to move away from an expensive custom-developed system to an MMIS-as-a-service approach.

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SMART Health IT Project Releases Update to Its App Gallery

Fred Bazzoli | Health Data Management | February 23, 2017

The SMART Health IT Project has developed an updated version of its app gallery, enabling those looking for apps based on the Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources to have an easier time looking and comparing. The Computational Health Informatics Program at Boston Children’s Hospital unveiled the refreshed gallery as a beta release at this week’s HIMSS17 conference and is now live... In June 2016, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology awarded SMART Health IT a grant to support enhancement of the SMART App Gallery...

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Socrata Partners With Ethos To Deliver Government Open Performance Solution In The United Kingdom And Europe

Press Release | Socrata, Ethos | March 18, 2014

Socrata, a Seattle and London-based, open government, open data, and open performance solutions company, has announced a strategic partnership with UK headquartered, Ethos, the leading provider of “Smart City” solutions. Together, Socrata and Ethos will partner to deliver an open performance solution specifically designed to create measurable outcomes for cities and municipalities in the United Kingdom and throughout Europe.

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Stakeholders Look to Improve C-CDA as FHIR Matures

Greg Slabodkin | Health Data Management | August 2, 2017

As the healthcare industry continues to wrestle with interoperability challenges, two standards are poised to play a central role in facilitating the electronic exchange of health information—one is a blunt tool for data sharing, while the other is a surgical instrument. First adopted in 2012 as part of the Office of National Coordinator for Health IT’s 2014 Edition final rule, the Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture (C-CDA) version 1.1—developed through the joint efforts of ONC and Health Level Seven (HL7) International—is now widely used among healthcare providers...

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Stakeholders To ONC: No One Architecture Perfect For EHRs, Data Sharing

Marla Durben Hirsch | Fierce EMR | August 12, 2014

Interoperability is a major part of Stage 3 of Meaningful Use, but the timeframes may be too short to transition from current Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture (C-CDA) used in Stage 2 to the application program interfaces (APIs) and proposed HL7 Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) Standard for Stage 3, according to vendors and stakeholders speaking at a recent joint Health IT Policy and Standards Committee listening session...

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Team Bahmni at the OpenMRS Worldwide Summit

ThoughtWorks first began contributing to OpenMRS in 2006 and since that time, we've had over fifty committers to OpenMRS in GitHub. Incidentally, one in every seven OpenMRS contributor in GitHub is a ThoughtWorker! Naturally, in 2013, when we had the opportunity to build Bahmni, an open source hospital information system, we choose OpenMRS as the underlying Electronic Medical Records System (EMR). Bahmni leverages the mature data model and APIs of OpenMRS, whilst providing an out-of-the-box system that can be immediately used by hospitals.

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Team Demonstrates Digital Health Platform for Department of Veterans Affairs

Press Release | Georgia Institute of Technology | January 31, 2017

“Liberate the data.” That was a principal design goal for a team of public-private health care technology collaborators established by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Veterans Health Administration to develop a working and scalable proof-of-concept digital health platform (DHP) to support the department’s long-term vision. The open-source project demonstrated both proven and emerging technologies for interoperability and advanced functionality innovations from both the public and private sectors...

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The Cryptocurrency Open Source API Marketplace for Developers

Jennifer Riggins | ProgrammableWeb | December 12, 2015

The API economy is the reality we live in and it’s an enormous one that, once the Internet of Things kicks into full gear, will feature an infinite number of API calls a day. But as we globalize, the world and the products—in this case APIs—we sell in it become more complicated and often more expensive as we factor in all the friction of exchange rates and credit card micropayments. It’s in everybody’s interest to smooth over that friction so developers can access our APIs or application programming interfaces more easily. To achieve that could require a change in the way we handle API monetization; something that should be done now before the API economy blows up more than ever before...

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The HITECH Era in Retrospect

John D. Halamka, M.D. and Micky Tripathi, Ph.D. | The New England Journal of Medicine | September 7, 2017

At a high level, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 accomplished something miraculous: the vast majority of U.S. hospitals and physicians are now active users of electronic health record (EHR) systems. No other sector of the U.S. economy of similar size (one sixth of the gross domestic product) and complexity (more than 5000 hospitals and more than 500,000 physicians) has undergone such rapid computerization...

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The HITECH Era – A Patient-Centered Perspective

Robert M. Wachter, Michael Blum, Aaron Neinstein, and Mark Savage | Connecting Health Data | October 10, 2017

We appreciate the recent perspectives published in the New England Journal of Medicine on the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 and the positive impact that it and resulting health IT policies have had on U.S. health care.1,2 The perspectives highlighted the remarkable increase in adoption and use of electronic health records (EHRs) over the past eight years, thanks to the HITECH Act and to ONC’s and CMS’s implementation of it with major advice and help from the multi-stakeholder HIT Policy and Standards committees...

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The Next Generation of EHRs Will Be Fundamentally Different

Robert Rowley | CIO | March 29, 2017

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) have come a long way. Over 80 percent of physicians use them in their offices, and nearly all hospitals have implemented EHRs as well. Spurred by the HITECH portion of the 2009 Recovery act, Meaningful Use has put money on the table for physicians and hospitals to adopt and use EHRs. It also defined what kinds of features an EHR must have in order to be Certified. Legacy systems took on these new requirements by adding to their offerings (sometimes referred to as “bolt-on solutions”)...

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The Postmodern EHR: What are the Enablers?

Traditional monolithic EHR architectures focus on stability and standardization at the expense of agility. Along with innovation, cloud based deployment and integration of things, agility is the main differentiator when describing the requirements of application architecture for the Postmodern EHR. Achieving agility is impossible for the vast majority of healthcare applications today as they are an inseparable mix of code for user interface, decision logic, workflows and data definitions. New architectures promote agility and reuse by turning the applications inside out and layering the four types of programming into portals, rule engines, process engines and XML data. Let’s look at some examples, layer by layer:

The Postmodern EHR: The Data Layer

This second approach entails defining a data layer, which is the most important aspect of the Postmodern EHR architecture from my previous post. Why is this the most important layer? Most healthcare organizations are beginning to realize that their data is more valuable than their applications. Data has become a key asset, since good data is key to improving outcomes, managing chronic disease and enabling population health management. And it needs to be managed for the lifetime of the patient. Which application is going to last that long? What happens to health data when we switch applications?

Three Innovative Tools You Didn’t Think The U.S. Government Could Build

John Paul Titlow | Fast Company | November 11, 2015

After the botched launch of Healthcare.gov in October 2013, it felt like the bugs, headaches, and negative headlines would never stop piling up. But the White House learned its lesson and from the ashes of that blunder, the Obama administration has begun rewiring how government approaches tech. It’s been just over a year since the launch of the U.S. Digital Service (USDS) and the government digital services agency 18F, but the lessons—and poached talent—from Silicon Valley is already infiltrating the federal government and yielding results...

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Timeline: How Apple Is Piecing Together its Secret Healthcare Plan

Bill Siwicki | Healthcare IT News | June 23, 2017

Rumors are at a fever pitch that Apple has big plans for healthcare, including putting a medical record on the iPhone, possibly acquiring its way into the EHR market. From its leap into healthcare in 2014 with its HealthKit application programming interface in September 2014 to the June 19 revelation of Apple’s work with the tiny start-up Health Gorilla, Apple has made a series of moves in healthcare that clearly indicate the company has plans for the space that will somehow manifest on its mega-popular iPhone and iPad products. Here’s a look at how Apple got to where it is today in healthcare...

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